SOLVED: (4th try) Samsung Chromebook 3, live antiX USB does not boot, MX 17 does

Forum Forums New users New Users and General Questions SOLVED: (4th try) Samsung Chromebook 3, live antiX USB does not boot, MX 17 does

This topic contains 57 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Buck Fankers Dec 25-1:14 pm.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 58 total)
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  • #14095
    Member
    caprea
    caprea
    Machine:   Type: Laptop System: GOOGLE product: Celes v: 1.0 serial: <filter> 
               Mobo: GOOGLE model: Celes v: 1.0 serial: <filter> UEFI: coreboot v: MrChromebox date: 08/27/2018 

    It’s anyway a UEFI, not ?
    So no F keys, only customize option.

    #14096
    Forum Admin
    rokytnji
    rokytnji

    He changed the bios caprea. So even I am not sure even though I own older chromebooks than the OP.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #14097
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    There are tons of options when presented with a grub screen on a live AntiX run.
    First thing I would try is erase boot options text in the box .
    Then later on play with F key grub boot options.

    I don’t think i can do this.
    I get that weird ascii boot menu and none of the boot options through function keys shows
    It does not seems like I can change anything.

    #14098
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    1. I don’t understand clearly what you like to do.Why not booting a working mx-installation and use the live-usb-maker and there use the full.featured mode for the antix17.2.iso ? This will create a usb-stick with persistence with antix17.2.

    2.Is the 4.14.0.3-amd64 smp kernel a debian kernel or a mx-kernel ? Because if it is a mx-kernel you have to add the mx-repos to the sources-list on the antix-live-stick to be able to install it.
    There’s a video about updating a kernel on a live-stick.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWvwbwTGOZ8

    3.Hopefully the stick will boot with another kernel and sure you can install it then.

    But maybe someone else can say something to the screenshots you have taken.

    1 – trying to use live antiX usb to boot so I can install it on computer. So far only MX17 works. Thanks for the tip for live-usb-maker, never use it yet, I’m new at MX, will look into it and see if I can figure this out.

    2 – I wouldn’t know if it is MX or antiX or Debian kernel, there are so many options in synaptic my head is spinning, until today I didn’t even realized there are different kernels, this complicates my task. Thanks you for pointing out about adding repos and for link to the relevant video, it’s now on my to-do list to watch it. (to-do part to understand it may be a problem) 😉

    #14100
    Forum Admin
    Dave
    Dave

    OK I am not 100% certain what is happening. It looks like the system is looking for a boot disk but cannot find it. Then it searches the usb and finds a grub menu. However I do not think that making a usb using dd will install grub properly on the usb as I think it is similar format to a cd which uses extlinux. That gives me another idea that might help is when making the persistent live usb if using live usb maker then you can choose the grub bootloader option.

    I am skeptical of this being the issue though as I am guessing that you made the mx usb in the same fashion as the antix one. This will take some thinking / comparing…

    Computers are like air conditioners. They work fine until you start opening Windows. ~Author Unknown

    #14102
    Forum Admin
    rokytnji
    rokytnji

    Hmm. wondering if this is one of those type of situations at the acc whatever screen . You type in

    live

    Hit the enter key. Then see what happens next.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #14103
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    I am skeptical of this being the issue though as I am guessing that you made the mx usb in the same fashion as the antix one. This will take some thinking / comparing…

    Yes, all usb sticks were done the same way, dd-ing iso file onto them.

    Thank you for a reply and don’t worry too much about it. Since I can use MX on it, I’m happy. It would be perfect case for antiX but if there are too many problems it is not worth stressing out over it. It is after all a special case, hardware specifically deigned for chrome os, original bios replaced, chrome os removed…

    Maybe some new bios update sometime later down the road may change things.
    Maybe some new kernel version some time down the road may change things also.

    And if not, I’m very happy with MX anyway 😉

    #14104
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    Hmm. wondering if this is one of those type of situations at the acc whatever screen . You type in

    live

    Hit the enter key. Then see what happens next.

    At that ascii boot screen? Will give it a try and let you know

    #14105
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    Hmm. wondering if this is one of those type of situations at the acc whatever screen . You type in

    live

    Hit the enter key. Then see what happens next.

    I don’t even get to the <enter> key part, at letter ‘e’ I enter boot menu configuration file, where you can change parameters etc, looks like some kind of nano text editor, but it is different one…

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by Buck Fankers.
    #14106
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    OK I am not 100% certain what is happening. It looks like the system is looking for a boot disk but cannot find it. Then it searches the usb and finds a grub menu.

    Now that you mentioned it, I recall I noticed, all those MX versions that does boot OK from USB stick, (17.1 (several different monthly snapshots) workbench 18.3 and 18.8…) I think every time I saw a msg, tha something can’t read, or similar (goes by fast) that it is re-trying, doing second reading from cd rom/usb and then seems like reading is successful and booting off live usb stick continue normal.

    I don’t know if this is of any help,

    Also, I don’t know if this is of any significance, when I installed MX on this chromebook, it didn’t boot right away, but per tutorial, this is nothing unusual, I had to pick in bios to boot from the file, had to click to the efi file, to manage to boot it for the first time and then I had to move that file from one folder to another, don’t remember specifics now, but it was something that some systems require those steps before they can be booted from then on. I can find the tutorial if you want. I know I saved the url, just need to remember where, which computer, what browser…. 😉

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by Buck Fankers.
    #14114
    Avatar
    Anonymous

    I’m repeating myself but, never mind.

    Just make a boot media with Rufus (https://rufus.ie/en_IE.html) so you can be sure it’s 100 % working on BIOS and on UEFI. Use it in .iso mode, not in dd. Use same USB pen key as your usb ports (USB 2 –> USB 2 / USB 3 –> USB 3) and reconsider using “known working” OS (MX-17.1) to start with.

    You already said, your Linux knowledge is somewhat lacking and I still repeat myself — install any kind of MX that works for you for beginning and come back here to sort what’s easy to sort — installing IceWM on MX and regaining some space.

    After you’ve got MX installed, it’s a small one liner in Terminal that’ll install you basic IceWM. Then you log out, choose IceWM and log back in.

    Removing all unneeded stuff you can do yourself from MX software center by simply unchecking all memory hungry applications — you just uncheck gimp, libre office, firefox etc. and for the couple of things left, we’ll help you remove them either over the synaptic or over the cmd.

    Same so for installing. It’s again a simple one liner in Terminal to install ceni, links2, moc, ranger, zathura … and, you’re up and running.

    By the way, when you make a fresh install of antiX, you have exactly the same problem — you have to get rid of 1/3 of completely unnecessary stuff first. Well, unless you wanna keep 4 WM’s, 3 file managers, remastering and a bunch of live options ON AN INSTALLED system. 😉

    Said the other way, we can much easier help you to remove Firefox, be it over the command line or over the synaptic or over the software center, then to help you to boot on some “extraterrestrial” modded HW which nobody of us knows.

    You should have at lest 16 GB HD on your machine and that’s more then enough to install MX to start with. With our assistance, you would get rid of unwanted, even if you have zero Synaptic or Terminal knowledge.

    Actually, if you’ve done that when I proposed it for the first time, you’d already long time have a working IceWMX with HD space and RAM usage halved.

    #14132
    Moderator
    masinick
    masinick

    Based on what I’ve read, part of the issue being discussed appears (at least based on the explanations I’ve seen) to be based on which kernel and possibly which installation configuration works best for the system in question.

    Given that antiX and MX are both based on Debian software, the packaging method is the Debian apt (using Synaptic, apt, gdebi, apt-get, or dpkg depending on what you are doing, your level of [confusion or experience] and which routines are working best.

    MX is based on antiX, but it is a replacement for the distribution that predates both MX and antiX – MEPIS, which goes back to the early 2000s. MEPIS is also based on Debian packaging, Nearly all of MEPIS has been replaced, either through changes in Linux, Debian, or modernization, but the underlying methodology remains similar.

    One other point: antiX is available in at least three forms: Full (which now exceeds the size of a CD), and it offers a reasonably lightweight, but complete system with more than one window manager alternative and multiple options for a few major utilities and applications. The second antiX form is Base. As the name may suggest, this form provides the basis for a system, but does not provide every utility or application you may wish you use, and therefore, it is a good choice for those who want to customize their own system. The third form is Core. This form provides only the system kernel and just enough of the core utilities to start up. You have to install everything else yourself. This is for the customizer and enthusiast who wants complete control over all packaging and configuration decisions; it’s only one step up from a 100% Do It Yourself (DIY) system – Linux From Scratch – LFS – goes that final step beyond the antiX Core distribution.

    MX was built with the help of the former MEPIS community using the antiX tools that have evolved over the past 12-13 years. At this point it is based on antiX rather than the original MEPIS code.

    I give all of this background in order to help people understand that it’s possible to build a system from MX or any of the antiX variants. MX and antiX have their own repositories, but they all have common Debian and antiX roots, so as long as specific packages do not conflict with one another, it is theoretically possible to mix and match components from parts of the different distributions. The challenges come into play when conflicting libraries are used, coming from subsystems that may have been built from a slightly (or greatly) different foundation.

    So if you find something that works from one approach, you can add on packages from the other distribution as long as they use the same Debian repository foundation – Stable, Testing, or Unstable. In some cases, you can add software from all three foundations, but you must understand the interactions between the different pieces, or you may create something you’ll have to replace entirely because of software conflicts – as anticapitalista and others have mentioned elsewhere in this forum. I hope this helps; if it doesn’t, either ignore it, or ask me questions about areas that are either confusing or irrelevant to your concerns.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by masinick.

    Brian Masinick

    #14135
    Member
    caprea
    caprea

    There was an interesting post in the mx-forum by felix.
    Could be that this is also an option for you.
    https://forum.mxlinux.org/viewtopic.php?p=471362#p471362
    In the end after all, it would still be nice if you could boot and install antix and mx18 as well.

    #14155
    Moderator
    masinick
    masinick

    For what it’s worth (probably another item mainly for veteran users) I put many distributions on my system by creating 1/2 dozen to a dozen partitions, and then populate them with my favorite distributions. Therefore, for me, I almost always have Debian, antiX, and MX available on these systems.

    I do also have a couple of Chromebooks handy; I leave them alone and simply update them when a new version of ChromeOS becomes available. None of my computers are brand new. My newest ones were purchased new, but at the end of their new sales life, and they’re all several years old; no problem; all work very well.

    Brian Masinick

    #14565
    Member
    Avatar
    Buck Fankers

    I’m sorry for late reply, life got in away I had hardly any time for computer.

    I appreciate your help, I understand what you are trying to do, I have no problem with installations, command line or synaptic… I can do these basic things. What I’m too old for to do, is tweaking, configuration files, changing one configuration into something different. I tried once, I was frustrated for a few days and end result was complete disaster and re-install.

    Installing antiX as it comes originally pre-set and tweak it a little bit per Dolphin Oracle video where he shows every step to use it as space/something I can do this. Installing MX and them mess with DM’s and configurations to get something different out of it – this is for younger and more computer savvy and more patient than I am 🙂

    I actually did found work around, if I set antiX on one computer, create shapshot iso and use this snapshot iso, I can boot with it on Chromebook. But I can’t with original iso. Interesting. (although I have some other problem so i will stay with MX which is working surprisingly good on this weak machine, hat off)

    New MX 18 iso will also not boot but I can again circumvent this by making my own snapshot on another computer. So problem is solved again since now I can get any personal version on this chromebook. Perfect!

    I just wanted to let you know I really do appreciate your help, it is not that I was ignoring you, it was just not something I’m comfortable doing it, based on previous bad experience when i tried to replicate some DM settings. I was told it was easy, it was a night mare for me! Never again, life is too short, I’m going with already set up systems and life gets much easier ;-)))

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