An important recommendation: OneTab Addon for Firefox.

Forum Forums General Tips and Tricks An important recommendation: OneTab Addon for Firefox.

  • This topic has 7 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated Aug 20-6:10 am by sybok.
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  • #36110
    Member
    frtorresfrtorres

    I have been using AntiX in a low memory box with limited resources.

    I installed this Firefox add-on, with excellent results.

    OneTab addon — “Save up to 95% memory and reduce tab clutter”

    Home Site: https://www.one-tab.com/

    Whenever you find yourself with too many tabs, click the OneTab icon to convert all of your tabs into a list in ONE TAB, saving memory having lots of tabs open while you browse the internet. When you need to access the tabs again, you can either restore them individually or all at once.

    Conveniently you can export/import to/from text files your bookmarks to make your own collection.

    Hope you enjoy it.

    Francisco

    • This topic was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by frtorres.
    #36142
    Member
    XecureXecure

    Good tip. I am sure many will find it useful.

    #36150
    Forum Admin
    rokytnjirokytnji

    Moved this to tips and tricks. Thanks.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    I'm not outa place. I'm from outer space.

    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #36974
    Member
    rayluorayluo

    When the original post above was posted, I understood what such a one-tab plugin would do, and I thought it would be a “good-to-have”.

    Turns out it is a life-saver, if some of your computer happen to be at the low-end of the spectrum (which might be the case in the community here).

    Specifically, if a computer does not have plenty of memory yet you open too many tabs in your browser (who doesn’t?), a newly opened tab could become the last straw to bring your computer into Thrashing mode. The symptoms include: CPU usage go high (and go red); Hard disk light flashes (if you have a swap file on hard disk, that is); and the entire system become very unresponsive. At this point, if you do not want to reboot and lose all your current Desktop session, your only option would be: (1) to start a Terminal console; (2) Run a ps -ef|grep firefox to find its PIDs; (3) Run a kill PID to close Firefox. These procedure is slow because each keystroke would take seconds.

    But if you have One-Tab plugin already installed, you just need one click on that funnel icon in your browser. And then get up to refill your coffee, when you come back, most likely One-Tab has closed all Firefox tabs for you.

    Thanks @frtorres for sharing this useful tool!

    #39608
    Member
    frtorresfrtorres

    You are welcome!.

    I am glad you and community like it.

    Regards, Francisco.

    #40543
    Member
    syboksybok

    Hi, two brief comments (stumbled across this when searching for another topic related to FireFox):
    1) @rayulo: kill:
    You can achieve it more swiftly if you use pkill
    pkill <process>
    or alternately you can create a shortcut to run the below command:
    kill -9 $(ps -U $(whoami) | grep -i <process> | awk ' { print $1 } ' | tr '\n' ' ')
    where the switch ‘-9’ is more forcefull and it can be applied to ‘pkill’ as well

    Decoding the $(…) part:
    $(whoami) = current user
    ps -U $(whoami) | grep -i <process> = all processes described by <process> name (case insensitive ‘-i’)
    awk ‘ { print $1 } ‘ = print 1st column only
    tr ‘\n’ ‘ ‘ = replace ‘\n’ EOL (end of line) by white-space ‘ ‘, i.e. column into a line

    See the manual pages (‘man pkill’ in a terminal).

    Edit: You can define a BASH function in your ‘~/.bashrc’ file accepting a single argument, the process name

    function force_kill(){
      # Force kill process
      local proc_name="$*"
      if [ -z "${proc_name}" ]; then
        echo "No process name specified, nothing to kill [return]"
        return;
      fi
      kill -9 $(ps -U $(whoami) | grep -i "${proc_name}" 2>/dev/null | awk ' { print $1 } ' | tr '\n' ' ')
    } # force_kill

    and then simply call it
    force_kill <process>
    WARNING: The function has not been tested!

    2) nice:
    When starting programs that may eat up a lot of resources, you may call them as follows
    nice <program>
    or you can specify the niceness; this reduces their priority when accessing resources of your device.

    I have defined custom shortcuts, e.g. Ctrl+Alt+F = /usr/bin/nice /usr/bin/firefox –private-window

    See the manual pages (‘man nice’ in a terminal).

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by sybok. Reason: ~/.bashrc function
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by sybok.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by sybok.
    #40547
    Member
    syboksybok

    Hi, two brief comments (stumbled across this when searching for another topic related to FireFox):
    1) @rayulo: kill:
    You can achieve it more swiftly if you use pkill
    pkill <process>
    or alternately you can create a shortcut to run the below command:
    kill -9 $(ps -U $(whoami) | grep -i <process> | awk ' { print $1 } ' | tr '\n' ' ')
    where the switch ‘-9’ is more forcefull and it can be applied to ‘pkill’ as well

    Decoding the $(…) part:
    $(whoami) = current user
    ps -U $(whoami) | grep -i <process> = all processes described by <process> name (case insensitive ‘-i’)
    awk ‘ { print $1 } ‘ = print 1st column only
    tr ‘\n’ ‘ ‘ = replace ‘\n’ EOL (end of line) by white-space ‘ ‘, i.e. column into a line

    See the manual pages (‘man pkill’ in a terminal).

    Edit: You can define a BASH function in your ‘~/.bashrc’ file accepting a single argument, the process name

    function force_kill(){
      # Force kill process
      local proc_name="$*"
      if [ -z "${proc_name}" ]; then
        echo "No process name specified, nothing to kill [return]"
        return;
      fi
      kill -9 $(ps -U $(whoami) | grep -i "${proc_name}" 2>/dev/null | awk ' { print $1 } ' | tr '\n' ' ')
    } # force_kill

    and then simply call it
    force_kill <process>
    WARNING: The function has not been tested!

    2) nice:
    When starting programs that may eat up a lot of resources, you may call them as follows
    nice <program>
    or you can specify the niceness; this reduces their priority when accessing resources of your device.

    I have defined custom shortcuts, e.g. Ctrl+Alt+F = /usr/bin/nice /usr/bin/firefox –private-window

    See the manual pages (‘man nice’ in a terminal).

    EDIT: My post seems to have gone.

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