antiX 22 dwm Unofficial Spin – Release 2

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  • This topic has 47 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Apr 22-7:19 pm by Brian Masinick.
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  • #113691
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick

      @techore whatever you come up with, and whether I use it or not, I still love these kinds of efforts, and if you have some success, I will gladly applaud it!
      Even if it doesn’t work out, I appreciate these kinds of efforts. Best wishes in your work and thank you for sharing.

      Just the other day I was chatting with one of my long time geek friends and I mentioned the stuff I’ve been doing recently with Ungoogled Chromium. Like me, this guy is a laptop user, but he has a couple of systems with a LOT more oomph than any of my systems. He told me that one of his recent builds – I *think* it was Ungoogled Chromium, but it *may* have been something else, took a WHOPPING 8 hours to complete. He also mentioned that even building some rather small app also took at LEAST five minutes. This kind of time and energy is probably why SO FEW people actually build software from source themselves.

      25 years ago or so I used to regularly configure, compile, and build the latest version of GNU Emacs. At one of my software engineering jobs, we had a “Contrib” bin area where we could build software, such as the latest version of Emacs or the latest version of some Web Browser and sent it for inclusion into this Contrib area, including the binaries and also the details on how to build or rebuild it; I’d do this from time to time so I could have the latest version of various tools and utilities without constantly having to rebuild them. It may have taken 5-10 minutes to build, but we did have fairly substantial server systems on which we could build our software. The thing is, just about ANY system of any substance today is faster than those old hunks, with the possible exception of the I/O subsystems, which were high performance, and with only minor beefing up, could go into “Supercomputer” systems, which this company was also capable of building.

      Anyway, some of today’s software is much more complex, both in size and content, so I’m grateful when we include some of this great software in our collection, whether we choose the leanest options or occasionally make others available.

      Best wishes with your endeavor!

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      Brian Masinick

      #113704
      Member
      techore

        You are spot on. Neovim has been a real pain in the butt to package. I fell back on pulling down the debian source packages which should just have worked. They did not. Found one or more missing dependencies and now there some addition ambiguous (to me) dependency error(s) that I still have not fixed. I had the github source compiled and debian packages, neovim and neovim-runtime, working weeks ago using neovim github instructions. However, the resulting package isn’t compliant with debian package policy. I don’t expect perfection but like to hit nearer the mark.

        Decided to take a day off from it and develop a new attack plan. Admittedly, the biggest issue is my knowledge and experience. That gap I will close with effort and time.

        #113706
        Moderator
        Brian Masinick

          Neovim is cool, and alas it MAY replace Vim; Bram, the creator of Vim, passed away this week.

          Did you see this news?

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          Brian Masinick

          #113719
          Member
          techore

            I did not! Sad to hear. Googling for more info.

            #113721
            Moderator
            Brian Masinick
              #113724
              Member
              bci

                http://stackdiary.com/a-tribute-to-bram-moolenaar/

                My respects. I have fond memories of learning to program using the Vim editor. In particular, I remember reading through his Seven Habits of Effective Text Editing.

                #113728
                Member
                mcpderez

                  2. antix-dwm 22 use of bash scripts and git repositories will move to using debian packages and a repository <– still need to find a home for the repository

                  Maybe it is just because I’m not familiar with Debian packaging, but I found the bash script and git method very helpful for discovering what you were doing and trying to adapt it for a 32-bit version. I put that effort on hold pending release of antiX-23 32-bit core or net, but I plan to try again after release.

                  Could you still host the script and git method on gitlab or github and have some automation there that will build Debian packages and just post the pre-built packages also on your git server. It’s not too difficult to download and install a package for those who don’t want to build the environment with the scripts.

                  As I recall neovim was one of the pain points for i386 dependencies I was going to have to figure out or work around. Maybe lazyvim would be better???

                  #113735
                  Moderator
                  Brian Masinick

                    http://stackdiary.com/a-tribute-to-bram-moolenaar/

                    My respects. I have fond memories of learning to program using the Vim editor. In particular, I remember reading through his Seven Habits of Effective Text Editing.

                    Bram’s “Seven Habits of Effective Text Editing” is indeed a very good document! I noticed right away that though (of course) he was partial to his own text editor, his opening comments discuss some very useful and important points. One in particular caught my eye:

                    “Most time is spent reading, checking for errors and looking for the right place to work on, rather than inserting new text or changing it. Navigating through the text is done very often, thus you should learn how to do that quickly.”

                    His numerous other suggestions, if utilized, turn very good editors into priceless tools. That’s one reason why on the few occasions that I still write scripts or do anything beyond simple editing, I use either a vi or Emacs editor or a derivative. Since I don’t do as much detailed editing as I once did, I put Geany on all of my systems. Not only is it a REALLY light editor, it’s also quite powerful too. It’s STANDARD on antiX and in spite of my decades of experience with vi and Emacs editor, I recommend it heartily. Bram’s points stand, and Geany can be used VERY effectively too.

                    I don’t know how many of you realized it, but Bram was ONLY 62 years old at his passing; I’m already five years older than that, as the natural skin and hair color suggest! Gentlemen like Bram deserve our respect, as do many of the outstanding contributors in this fine collection of diverse, intelligent, opinionated people!

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                    Brian Masinick

                    #113736
                    Moderator
                    Brian Masinick

                      About ten years ago or so I was working on some very large documents and I wanted to rapidly search, edit, and either copy or replace small, but important quantities of information, then save immediately. Depending on what else I was doing, I’d continue to edit, but I definitely saved any time I made a change. If I remember right, at that time I tried multiple text editors; not sure if it was a Vim or a classic Vi editor that I tried, but at least on that particular document, the sheer size of it prevented the thousands of lines, PLUS wide data path in what I was working on to be effectively searched with just any old editing tool; I actually had to try a few of them until I found one up to the challenge of doing the job without something like a sed, Awk, or Perl filter operating on it instead of an editor; GNU Emacs was actually able to pull in the stuff I needed and do clean memory management on the rest of it, at least if my memory is accurate. That’s about the only use case I’ve ever had when only one or two specific tools would work the way I wanted them to on the quantity of data I was evaluating and modifying.

                      I’m guessing that with the more modern memory management and multiprocessor techniques that have been GREATLY improved upon in the past 10-15 years it’d be very unlikely to cause this scenario to reappear, but who knows, if we attempt to edit files in the GB to TB range MAYBE the limits could STILL be stretched, pushed and exceeded; the stuff I worked with was BIG, but NOT quite THAT big!

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                      Brian Masinick

                      #113753
                      Member
                      techore

                        @mcpderez, it makes me feel happy to know someone is benefiting from my contributions.

                        Worse case, I will archive and rename the repository–assuming I want to reuse antix-dwm, probably, at a later date.

                        Best case, once I have the amd64 packages puzzled out, it should be simple to produce i386 packages. Well, in theory.

                        You are always welcome to reach out to me directly. No PM so ping me in the most recent antix-dwm release post or open an issue on gitlab. If it is something more involved, we can find a different communication channel and collaborate. Time is always a concern but if you don’t ask, no way of knowing and I don’t mind. 🙂

                        #113754
                        Moderator
                        Brian Masinick

                          @mcpderez, it makes me feel happy to know someone is benefiting from my contributions.

                          Worse case, I will archive and rename the repository–assuming I want to reuse the antix-dwm, probably, at a later date.

                          Best case, once I have the amd64 packages puzzled out, it should be simple to produce i386 packages. Well, in theory.

                          You are always welcome to reach out to me directly. No PM so ping me in the most recent antix-dwm release post or open an issue on gitlab. If it is something more involved, we can figure out a different communication channel and collaborate. Time is always a concern but if you don’t ask, no way of knowing and I don’t mind.

                          I’m glad to see it; thanks for your many other contributions here too; best wishes with your spin and other works too!

                          • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by anticapitalista.

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                          Brian Masinick

                          #113796
                          Member
                          mcpderez

                            You are always welcome to reach out to me directly

                            Thanks for the offer. I can be found with my username here on gmail.

                            #113829
                            Member
                            techore

                              Got it and you should now have mine!

                              #140081
                              Member
                              ted

                                @techore Hello . I would like to join in the congratulations, a lot of work has really been done.

                                I downloaded the ISO, installed it and checked it.

                                Is it possible to somehow contact the author of the project? I would like to set up a similar system and am ready to pay for the work,

                                #140107
                                Member
                                techore

                                  @ted, you will want to take at a look at the current spin which is still using dwm but a fork called dusk. I am referring to it as aXd which stands for antiX-dusk. Also, it is primarily built using packages not a bunch of bash scripts and tweaks like the antix-dwm spin. Mostly!

                                  I hope to have an ISO available for download in the next week or two. I will start a new thread when it is available. It will probably referred as “aXd Release Candidate” available for testing or some such.

                                  If you have questions or recommendations prior to the release candidate, you may post them in this thread:

                                  https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/axd-23-1-beta-spin-screenshots/

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