Antix install

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  • This topic has 31 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated Apr 27-8:53 pm by Bronimir.
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  • #139182
    Member
    Bronimir

      Hi guys,

      Few years ago I’ve tried the previous version of Antix and I don’t recall any troubles installing it. Yesterday I wanted to swap Lubuntu to latest Antix (23) and I wasn’t sure what to do on partitions step. I attached a picture of how the disc on my Lenovo laptop looks like. Do I need to create EFI or SWAP or BOOT or any other partition except the main Antix partition? What I was planning to do was just simply install Antix 23 on the /dev/sda8, but first it didn’t allow my carry on, because I haven’t select main partition and when I figured out how to do it, it asked me am I sure I don’t need EFI. If I only do the main partition is the boot loader going to work? I think that’s how it was with Lubuntu and previous Antix, but now I’m not sure – I thought it’ll be better to ask and make sure. I know there are lots of comments/tips on side, but yesterday I didn’t have much time to read all of them – I’ll do it tonight or tomorrow, but I thought I ask a question here as well to maybe get a clearer view.

      Thanks,
      Damian

      #139186
      Member
      techore

        Which antiX installation and version? Ideally, you would attach inxi output.

        inxi -zv7 > inxi.txt

        Two considerations. Before installing, my preference is to delete the target root partition /dev/sda8 prior to installation. Not required, but per se. As to EFI, it depends on if you are using grub using an ESP, EFI stubs, or alternative. /dev/sda7 appears to be an efi system partition (ESP) but best to verify and not guess. Worse case, you can do repairs with antiX Live media, but with a little preparation, you can avoid needing to fix stuff.

        If possible, backup the entire disk using your preferred tool. This assumes you have a second disk or external storage to save the backup. I use clonezilla for these activities but dd from the live media works, too.

        Further reading on EFI:

        https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface

        https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/EFI_system_partition

        https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/EFISTUB

        EDIT:
        /dev/sda7 appears to be the EFI/ESP for Lenovo Recovery System. You have two fat32 partitions. I agree with @ppc, the other fat32 partition, /dev/sda1, is the more likely candidate.

        https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/Lenovo-B-and-G-Series-Laptops/New-G580-has-seven-partitions-Help-identify/m-p/1153169?page=1#1154103

        • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by techore.
        • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by techore.
        #139191
        Member
        PPC

          If memory serves me right, in the start of the installation process, you have to select the EFI partition (in your case sda1) and install the bootloader there, then select to install “/” in the desired partition (sda8). The installer should proceed normally from there, without any extra problems.
          EDIT: Like previously said – always backup important stuff before installing any OS!

          P.

          • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by PPC.
          #139304
          Member
          sybok

            An additional comment:
            I prefer to have a separate /home partition (i.e. one for root / = root AND another for /home) which makes it easy to re-install antiX (when I mess it up) while preserving /home.

            Also, please be aware that antiX does not come with ‘systemd’, hence some applications requiring it will not be installable! That’s a potential downside when switching from *buntu or Debian.
            If that does not discourage you, then you may find antiX more basic, but nonetheless polish-ed (pun intended 🙂 ) and using less resources.

            Happy antiX-ing and… Peace and long live!

            #139315
            Member
            Bronimir

              Ok, so shall I select sda1 for EFI during Antix installation?
              I was planning to remove sda6 and sda8 and combine them into single partition, but maybe I’ll do 2 as recomended – one for / (root) and another for /home (which tbh I newer knew what does these mounting points mean).

              P.S.
              Do you know if it’s possible to install Steam on Antix, maybe even GOG via Wine? Is there Wine on Antix – I haven’t been use it for long time, but I thought I can try it again, because I’ve found awesome mod (HotA) for Heroes 3 (which I have on GOG).

              #139319
              Member
              sybok

                PARTITIONS:
                I would be careful with removing any NTFS partition as it was (most-likely) created during initial installation of tools by the manufacturer or by Windows… it may contain something Windows just expect to be there.

                / = (partition) where the system is, other partitions may be mounted to any of its sub-directories
                /home = directory in ‘/’, default place where “home” of each user (with a home*) is created; if a separate “home” partition was created, then this directory is the mount-point of this partition.

                ——————
                * there can be users dedicated to services with restricted access (not to run the service with root privileges) that do not require a home directory.

                GAMING:
                Regarding Steam – the official web-site provides a DEB package (not sure if for *buntu or Debian); it seems that there are no dependencies related to systemd.
                But if there is a systemd service meant to be running, that could be an issue.
                https://itslinuxfoss.com/install-steam-debian-12/#1 <– Steam is|was installable on Debian 12

                A brief check of the internet mentions GOG (games) can be installed using ‘snap’, not supported in antiX as it depends on systemd.
                It seems that there are alternate clients that can be used
                https://itsfoss.com/play-gog-games-linux/
                but I am not into gaming myself.

                EDIT: A new topic related to Steam appeared, i.e. it is installable bot not always working 100%, see https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/steam-and-jwm/

                • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by sybok.
                #139371
                Member
                PPC

                  Do you know if it’s possible to install Steam on Antix, maybe even GOG via Wine? Is there Wine on Antix – I haven’t been use it for long time, but I thought I can try it again

                  Please read the Unofficial FAQs https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/unoficial-antix-23-frequently-asked-questions/ – section “*4 – Do you want to install an application/ remove an application?” – it talks about Steam and Wine – yes they both run on antiX.
                  The repository has Heroic available, that’s a front-end for GOG and Epic Games (I’ve only used as a way to access my Epic Games, and it works very well).
                  Some games that use anticheat are not compatible with Linux- because of the way certain anticheat systems work.

                  EDIT: I tested Steam on antiX 22, using IceWM and it seems to work perfectly (but the game I tried was not compatible with Proton (the compatibility layer forked from WINE that allows Windows games to run under Linux).

                  P.

                  • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by PPC.
                  #139373
                  Member
                  techore

                    Some games that use anticheat are not compatible with Linux- because of the way certain anticheat systems work.

                    In my experience, it is most. 🙁

                    #139706
                    Member
                    Bronimir

                      Ok, so the story goes on…
                      Btw, I’m aiming to use 2 linuxes: EasyOS as live-USB and Antix as installed on my PC and laptop (where I used to have Ubuntu and Lubuntu).

                      First, I removed (and eventually combine) sda8 and sda4 (not sda6 as I mentioned above – sda4 looked to me as normal partition, I even had some files there which I copied onto sda3 while on Windows) using GPartedand (on EasyOS from pendrive), so I got this.
                      GParted unallocated

                      Then I thought I’ll try restart laptop and check if I can still start Windows. Tbh, I expected not, because from my experience, once removing Linux which is on different partition of the same disc, I loose grub and system won’t find “old” Windows boot loeader (or maybe it’s being deleted or corrupted – I don’t know) and that I’ll get error message – that’s exactly what happened.
                      Grub error

                      I wanted to double check the manual Boot Options Menu (pressing F12 while switching laptop on) and there was an option for Windows, so I chose it and it worked.
                      Boot menu

                      While on Windows, the interesting thing was – the D drive was still there, with all the files still accessible, like nothing happened! Hence I went back to GParted on EasyoS and tbh I’m not sure what I found there (I haven’t take a picture), but I pretty sure, from GParted it was as I left it, so unallocated space and no sda8 and sda4. Because removing partitions via GParted was very quick, I thought it hasn’t done proper formatting, just removing labels or something. I couldn’t find “proper format” option, so I thought I’ll change the file format and maybe that will, at least, erase the files from the sda4 when accesses from Windows (called D drive there). Ok, so I created new partition from the whole unallocated space as ext4, then I changed it to ext2, but all the changing was very quick, a matter of a minute maybe, so I restarted laptop again to see what I’ll find in Windows. The D drive was still there, with all the files!!! I removed the files in Windows and then the D drive became unaccessible – it didn’t show me the total and free space anymore, as well as that it is ntfs, it was just blank. I opened Disc Manager in Windows (I think at that times it showed similar partitions as GParted, but I didn’t take picture, so I’m not sure) and I started formatting partition (to ntfs), but that took over an hour, so I was pretty sure it’s a proper format. This is where I am right now and what I see in GParted from EasyOS.
                      Final partitions

                      So now I have the following 2 questions:

                      1. I like the idea of 2 partitions – one for Antix itsef “/” and second for everythig else “/home”. How much space shall I allocate to “/”? Does it mean everythig I do (all the files, applications, etc.) will go to “/home” and the content as well as size of “/” never changes? Shall I leave this partition as NTFS and the Antix installator will deal with changing file system to ext4 or shall I change it to unallocated or maybe do something else?

                      2. Which partition shall I select as EFI during Antix installation? Where is Windows bootloader? Here I’ll put some more ss of sda1 and sda7 files and folder.
                      https://postimg.cc/gallery/Bj5KStn
                      https://postimg.cc/gallery/yD58zHF

                      Thanks a lot for help guys!

                      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Bronimir.
                      #139721
                      Member
                      RJP

                        1. 25 to 30 GB for / (root-partition).
                        For /home as much as possible (500 GB or more).

                        2. In EFI systems all EFI-boot systems are in the same partition (/dev/sda1 in your case).

                        #139746
                        Member
                        anti-apXos

                          The D drive was still there, with all the files!!! I removed the files in Windows and then the D drive became unaccessible – it didn’t show me the total and free space anymore, as well as that it is ntfs, it was just blank. I opened Disc Manager in Windows (I think at that times it showed similar partitions as GParted, but I didn’t take picture, so I’m not sure) and I started formatting partition (to ntfs), but that took over an hour, so I was pretty sure it’s a proper format.

                          This sounds like you may have “Fast Startup” enabled in Windows, which is the default. Windows Fast Startup uses a form of hibernation when you turn the system off, and is defintiely not recommended for dual boot systems. YOu want true complete shutdown and startup not Microsoft’s weird hybrid thing. Web search for “how to disable Windows Fast Startup” should give you plenty of good results. It may be okay to leave Fast Startup enabled as long as you don’t ever mount or modify any Windows partitions in Linux, but I think it’s best to turn it off. It’s really not even that much faster in my experience.

                          Deleting and formatting partitions should not take long. It’s just a change to the partition table. It should only take a couple seconds in most cases. I have no idea what Windows did that made it take so long, that’s more concerning. My advice would be to delete that partition in Windows and leave it unformatted, shut down Windows completely (i.e. no Fast Startup), boot to Linux and format the partition as ext4 and then run the installer. The formatting to ext4 step may not be necessary, I can’t remember, but it won’t hurt (and, like I said, should be very fast).

                          By the way, no knocks on EasyOS, which I haven’t used, but antiX works great from a Live USB, too. It has probably the best live system of any Linux distro. EasyOS is based on Puppy, which is also good for live booting, but antiX is a bit more flexible.

                          #139770
                          Member
                          Bronimir

                            Ok, thanks a lot for help guys. I actually had some troubles with Win Fast Startup on another PC and I had to switch it off there. Will do for this one as well. Tbh, I really dislike Windows after Win7. Win10 is on this laptop I think, so I might swap it to Win7 and now I’ve got even more arguments for this change 🙂

                            Any idea what’s the sda7 drive then? It looks like a messed up copy of sda1 and tbh I’m thinking of removing it. Well, if I’ll go for Win7 then I probably remove all drives and do a brand new partitioning.

                            #139771
                            Member
                            anti-apXos

                              Any idea what’s the sda7 drive then?

                              The partition label is “LRS_ESP”, so you can just do a web search for that and learn more. It seems to be the boot partition for the Lenovo OneClick Recovery feature along with sda6 (LENOVO_PART).

                              #139788
                              Member
                              Bronimir

                                I should do the web-search beforehand… Thanks!

                                #139791
                                Member
                                techore

                                  /dev/sda7 appears to be the EFI/ESP for Lenovo Recovery System. You have two fat32 partitions. I agree with @ppc, the other fat32 partition, /dev/sda1, is the more likely candidate.

                                  https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/Lenovo-B-and-G-Series-Laptops/New-G580-has-seven-partitions-Help-identify/m-p/1153169?page=1#1154103

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