antiX screenshots – General

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  • This topic has 640 replies, 106 voices, and was last updated Jun 11-7:43 am by Brian Masinick.
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  • #123817
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick

      Running from my USB stick, customized after installing antiX 23.

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      Brian Masinick

      #123819
      Moderator
      Brian Masinick

        Updated the time to actual time. Here’s another USB Flash Drive screenshot from antiX 23:

        Attachments:

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        Brian Masinick

        #123868
        Member
        fungalnet

          ansiweather git

          is just a shell script you can save at /usr/local/bin/ then chmod +x ansiweather

          examples:
          ansiweather -l Gaza,Israel -s false -a false | cut -c 12-
          ansiweather -l Belfast,Ireland -s false -a false | cut -c 12-28
          ansiweather -l Liberal,Kansas -s false -a false | cut -c 12-25

          What I do is I have a script with a sleep function that checks it every 15′ and outputs a formatted output into a /tmp/wx file then have conky “cat /tmp/wx” on some similar frequency

          • This reply was modified 7 months, 1 week ago by fungalnet.
          #123875
          Moderator
          Brian Masinick

            I wrote a script called we for Greenville, SC and another one called Pecos-we for Pecos, Texas; here’s the Greenville version:

            cat we
            date +"%r";ansiweather -l Greenville -u imperial -d true -a false –s true | tr '-' '\n' && ansiweather -l Greenville -u imperial -d true -a false -s true -F | tr '-' '\n' | tr '>' '\n'
            we
            10:15:14 AM
             Weather in Greenville: 68 °F 
             UVI: 2.53 
             Wind: 9.22 mph NNW 
             Humidity: 73% 
             Pressure: 29.77 inHg 
             Sunrise: Nov 18 06:48:03 AM 
             Sunset: Nov 18 05:01:25 PM 
             Greenville forecast: Sat Nov 18: 71/50 °F ☀ 
             Sun Nov 19: 61/41 °F ☀ 
             Mon Nov 20: 62/43 °F ☁ 
             Tue Nov 21: 65/49 °F ☔ 
             Wed Nov 22: 72/64 °F ☔ 

            These do NOT have a GUI based output, but they CAN be put into a Yad script for those who do like a graphical output.

            • This reply was modified 7 months, 1 week ago by Brian Masinick.
            • This reply was modified 7 months, 1 week ago by Brian Masinick.

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            Brian Masinick

            #127156
            Forum Admin
            rokytnji

              Proof is in the pudding. Running live antiX 23.1 64 bit full iso. Runit testing version. On a Dell Chromebook.

              Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
              I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute off it.
              Motorcycle racing is rocket science.

              Linux Registered User # 475019
              How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

              #127503
              Member
              akaEpitaph

                New user here, hello to all. I’ve been reworking my themes for antiX. I haven’t used fluxbox for about 9 years, changed up my gtk theme that I currently use with Debian, and conky as well. The new conky syntax was a surprise but this new conky will integrate well when I upgrade Debian 11. I’m not a tech by any means, but I do get by. I hate asking for answers so I spend a lot of time searching. I hope I posted this right.

                Attachments:

                If it's not broke, break it
                Then learn how to fix it

                #127508
                Member
                techore

                  @akaEpitaph, looks great. Well done.

                  #127538
                  Moderator
                  Brian Masinick

                    @akaEpitaph, I agree with @techore, very nicely done indeed!

                    As for @rokytnji “Running live antiX 23.1 64 bit full iso. Runit testing version. On a Dell Chromebook.”

                    You deserve a lot of credit for your persistence in successfully getting this to work, congratulations!

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                    Brian Masinick

                    #127545
                    Member
                    akaEpitaph

                      Thanks @techore and @Brian Masinick. Coincidentally @rokytnji I originally downloaded antiX for a Dell Chromebook 11, and a Samsung Chromebook 4. I decided I didn’t like the Chromebook keyboard and bought an Asus Vivobook L203MA to keep with the mini laptop idea. That other screenshot is from the Asus. Here’s one from the Dell with my old themes and running lxde and openbox. Oh yeah, the other day I reinstalled ChromeOS on the Samsung and returned it to stock, it hasn’t reached EOL yet.

                      Attachments:

                      If it's not broke, break it
                      Then learn how to fix it

                      #127551
                      Moderator
                      Brian Masinick

                        Thanks @techore and @Brian Masinick. Coincidentally @rokytnji I originally downloaded antiX for a Dell Chromebook 11, and a Samsung Chromebook 4. I decided I didn’t like the Chromebook keyboard and bought an Asus Vivobook L203MA to keep with the mini laptop idea. That other screenshot is from the Asus. Here’s one from the Dell with my old themes and running lxde and Openbox. Oh yeah, the other day I reinstalled Chrome OS on the Samsung and returned it to stock, it hasn’t reached EOL yet.

                        You have done a very nice job; thanks for sharing about the different models, the pros and cons of each.

                        Regarding Chromebook keyboards, and keyboards in general, it definitely makes a difference which models you choose.

                        In the “old days” when IBM still produced commodity systems themselves, they always had solid keyboards. They did not necessarily have the “lightest touch” or the shortest key depression, but they were comfortable and when you typed something, you got what you entered. These days, especially on models with synaptics mouse pads (or whatever they are called now); there USED to be a synaptics driver for them; the current driver that replaced it is called xinput; anyway I have to turn them off so they don’t interfere with routine typing; so many times they’d steal the input, then cut or alter large sections of work; so I wrote, and/or modified information I obtained off the Internet to come up with this:

                        cat Touchpad.bash 
                        #!/bin/bash
                        # Touchpad.bash
                        read TPdevice <<< $( xinput | sed -nre '/TouchPad|Touchpad/s/.*id=([0-9]*).*/\1/p' )
                        state=$( xinput list-props "$TPdevice" | grep "Device Enabled" | grep -o "[01]$" )
                        if [ "$state" -eq '1' ];then
                            xinput --disable "$TPdevice" && notify-send -i emblem-nowrite "Touchpad" "Disabled" 2> /dev/null
                        else
                            xinput --enable "$TPdevice" && notify-send -i emblem-nowrite "Touchpad" "Enabled" 2> /dev/null
                        fi

                        Don’t know if anyone needs it, but if so, feel free to take it; I may have written some of it; I know I wrote the original one based on some information I learned from the synaptics driver; when that one failed, I found this stuff, but I can’t remember if I lifted some code from somewhere or just adapted what I had previously written, so I DO NOT claim this as original or exclusive work and anyone is free to grab it but only for PERSONAL use. Any commercial usage should evaluate free code and make sure that this or similar code is not from another effort; since I cannot recall, I recommend private use only. (I will reuse code, but unless I’m sure that 100% of the work is my own, I’d NEVER claim it as such, and I am NOT claiming this script as my own either.

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                        Brian Masinick

                        #127596
                        Member
                        akaEpitaph

                          @Masinick That script is WAY over my head. You’re right about the touchpads, my HP Probook 6560b touchpad is extremely sensitive and screws me up all the time. I never thought to disable scrolling and tapping on it. From what I just read there are 3 ways to disable scrolling and tapping:

                          Using xinput as you said.
                          Using libinput:
                          $ libinput debug-events –device [touchpad ID] disable-scrolling
                          $ libinput debug-events –device [touchpad ID] disable-tap
                          Using synclient:
                          $ synclient VertScrollDelta=0 HorizScrollDelta=0
                          $ synclient TapButton1=0 TapButton2=0 TapButton3=0

                          I haven’t verified those commands, next time I’m on the HP I will. I would be more comfortable using those

                          If it's not broke, break it
                          Then learn how to fix it

                          #127603
                          Moderator
                          Brian Masinick

                            @akaepitaph Regarding the Touchpad script that I wrote,
                            it’s really not necessary to have an excellent understanding
                            of it.

                            I use: alias t=’/home/masinick/bin/Touchpad.bash’
                            with the script, and when I call it, t will cause the touchpad
                            to toggle on or off. When I have a USB mouse connected, which
                            is NEARLY all the time, I do not need the touchpad; moreover
                            the touchpad on some of my systems is so sensitive that it
                            has a tendency to select text without that being the intention;
                            that was my personal motivation for seeking this script.

                            No, it’s NOT a mandatory thing; Yes, it is extremely useful
                            to me because I rarely even use the touchpad, and as mentioned,
                            more often than not, the touchpad is an unwelcome feature;
                            this way, however, I can choose to activate or deactivate it
                            by entering t, toggle touchpad and that solves my issue, but
                            allows me to turn on the touchpad if I don’t have the USB
                            mouse or if I want to use the pad for some reason.

                            --
                            Brian Masinick

                            #127684
                            Member
                            techore

                              I have to turn them off so they don’t interfere with routine typing; so many times they’d steal the input, then cut or alter large sections of work; so I wrote, and/or modified information I obtained off the Internet to come up with this:

                              I do the same for the exact reason you cite. I usually determine the correct laptop function code and bind or pick an arbitrary key-combo of my preference to toggle it on and off. Modern touch devices kind of suck, but I do understand the appeal of a built in mouse device.

                              @akaepitaph, if the script is a bit overwhelming, ask questions. As a community, we learn from each other and there are quite a few of us willing to walk you through a script. Later, you will help others. It’s a win-win! 😀

                              Thank you for sharing Brian.

                              #127700
                              Moderator
                              Brian Masinick

                                You’re welcome @techore and we agree in this matter.

                                Breaking down the script:

                                1) #!/bin/bash this is more than a comment; it tells the system that this is the program
                                to run (and since it’s a program (a script actually), it has to have the x bits set
                                to make it executable, that is, chmod +x Touchpad.bash

                                2) # Touchpad.bash this IS a comment; I nearly always put at least one comment to identify
                                the name of the file; this is a short script so I didn’t comment on anything else, but
                                I will do it now.

                                3) read TPdevice <<< $( xinput | sed -nre '/TouchPad|Touchpad/s/.*id=([0-9]*).*/\1/p' ) As this command suggests, it is a READ command; it reads the contents of the command; the <<< indicates that the information that follows is directed (read into) the variable called TPdevice. From the manual page, "xinput is a utility to list available input devices, query information about a device and change input device settings." We are extracting information about "TouchPad" When I type in xinput, here is what I get:

                                xinput
                                ⎡ Virtual core pointer                    	id=2	[master pointer  (3)]
                                ⎜   ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer              	id=4	[slave  pointer  (2)]
                                ⎜   ↳ HP HP USB WHEEL MOUSE                   	id=8	[slave  pointer  (2)]
                                ⎜   ↳ SYNA32AC:00 06CB:CD50 Touchpad          	id=9	[slave  pointer  (2)]
                                ⎜   ↳ SYNA32AC:00 06CB:CD50 Mouse             	id=10	[slave  pointer  (2)]
                                ⎣ Virtual core keyboard                   	id=3	[master keyboard (2)]
                                    ↳ Virtual core XTEST keyboard             	id=5	[slave  keyboard (3)]
                                    ↳ Video Bus                               	id=6	[slave  keyboard (3)]
                                    ↳ Power Button                            	id=7	[slave  keyboard (3)]
                                    ↳ AT Translated Set 2 keyboard            	id=11	[slave  keyboard (3)]
                                    ↳ Wireless hotkeys                        	id=12	[slave  keyboard (3)]
                                    ↳ HP WMI hotkeys                          	id=13	[slave  keyboard (3)]
                                All I care about is the information on the TouchPad line, so I find Touchpad
                                and extract details from that line.
                                4) from the sed manual page,        
                                              

                                s/regexp/replacement/
                                Attempt to match regexp against the pattern space. If success‐
                                ful, replace that portion matched with replacement. The re‐
                                placement may contain the special character & to refer to that
                                portion of the pattern space which matched, and the special es‐
                                capes \1 through \9 to refer to the corresponding matching sub-
                                expressions in the regexp.`

                                5) since we use \1 we are using the first sub-expression, which is the device.
                                6) Now we are ready to use the xinput command again, this time to enable or
                                disable the Touchpad.
                                7) We check the state of the device to see if it is enabled or disabled,
                                and set the flag.
                                8) IF the flag is 1, it indicates that the Touchpad is enabled, so we disable it.
                                9) IF the flag is 0, it indicates that the Touchpad is disabled, so we enable it.
                                10) running the command repeatedly alternates between enabling and disabling
                                the Touchpad. Once you break down each command, it’s not that difficult.

                                Incidentally, I did not know every part of that, but I took 5-10 minutes, reading
                                two manual pages (rather quickly; I found what I wanted almost immediately).

                                Now we have a step by step description of what’s going on. I already indicated
                                that I use a simple alias command to connect this to a single letter; you can
                                just as easily bind this to a function key or whatever is convenient to you.

                                `

                                --
                                Brian Masinick

                                #128194
                                Member
                                ile

                                  hello rokytnji
                                  Hello PPC, i use fluxbox menu tear-off this way; you perhaps enjoy 9menu.
                                  Hello low resource Launcher
                                  install the package <9menu>
                                  Run this to get normal window running six launchers
                                  for 465.5 KiB, 9menu. pose as icon, menu, panel, window,
                                  9menu One:leafpad Two:firefox Three:antiXradio Four:zzzfm Five:pmrp Six:skippy-xd

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