Browsers for old CPUs

Forum Forums General Software Browsers for old CPUs

  • This topic has 170 replies, 33 voices, and was last updated May 14-2:56 pm by Brian Masinick.
Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 171 total)
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  • #101210
    Member
    grey_rat

      This does not fully restore hardware acceleration for OpenGL 2.0 graphics cards in Firefox 102+
      layers.acceleration.force-enabled – true
      gfx.webrender.unaccelerated-widget.forcetrue
      gfx.webrender.allfalse
      gfx.webrender.enabledfalse

      layers.gpu-process.force-enabledtrue (work any opengl, test needed)

      #101687
      Member
      grey_rat

        In Antix 23a gfx.webrender.software.opengl – work

        #102151
        Member
        RJP

          Seamonkey seems to be the best browser for an old computer like this Fujitsu.

          $ inxi -b
          System:
            Host: antix1 Kernel: 4.9.0-326-antix.1-486-smp arch: i686 bits: 32
              Desktop: IceWM v: 3.3.1 Distro: antiX-22_386-full Grup Yorum 18 October 2022
          Machine:
            Type: Laptop System: FUJITSU SIEMENS product: LIFEBOOK C1110 v: N/A
              serial: <superuser required>
            Mobo: FUJITSU model: FJNB16F serial: <superuser required>
              BIOS: Phoenix/FUJITSU v: Version 1.25 date: 01/14/2004
          Battery:
            ID-1: CMB1 charge: 34.6 Wh (63.3%) condition: 54.7/54.7 Wh (100.0%)
          CPU:
            Info: single core Intel Pentium M [N/A] speed (MHz): 600 min/max: 600/1400
          Graphics:
            Device-1: Intel 82852/855GM Integrated Graphics driver: i915 v: kernel
            Display: x11 server: X.Org v: 1.20.11 driver: X: loaded: intel
              unloaded: fbdev,modesetting,vesa dri: i915 gpu: i915
              resolution: 1024x768~60Hz
            API: OpenGL v: 1.3 Mesa 20.3.5 renderer: Mesa DRI Intel 852GM/855GM
              x86/MMX/SSE2
          Network:
            Device-1: Realtek RTL-8100/8101L/8139 PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter
              driver: 8139too
            Device-2: Intel PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter driver: ipw2100
          Drives:
            Local Storage: total: 93.16 GiB used: 16.61 GiB (17.8%)
          Info:
            Processes: 137 Uptime: 40m Memory: 991.6 MiB used: 283.7 MiB (28.6%)
            Shell: Bash inxi: 3.3.25
          
          #102153
          Member
          PPC

            Generally speaking, for hardware that can’t effectivly run a “modern” web browser (like firefox-esr, firefox, or a chromium derived browser), seamonkey is one of the best choices. It’s what I use in my netbook- I installed the extension to open pdf’s on-line instead of always downloading them (I need that for work) and it’s my backup system.
            Recently a brasilian youtuber (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIUV1t78Z7g) tested several browsers on a low resources computer and found seamonkey to be the best one… I doubt a bit about his methodology, but agree with his results…

            P.

            #102154
            Member
            Lead Farmer

              Seamonkey seems to be the best browser for an old computer like this Fujitsu.

              Use a Chromeuim or Brave with Ad Blocker like uBlock Origin, and NoScript extensions, you will need to manage the scripts with NoScript extension.

              The browsers are CPU demanding, so there is limit what 1 core can do.

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 2 months ago by Lead Farmer.
              #102158
              Member
              RJP

                Use a Chromeuim or Brave with Ad Blocker like uBlock Origin, and NoScript extensions, you will need to manage the scripts with NoScript extension.

                The browsers are CPU demanding, so there is limit what 1 core can do.

                I have tested a lot of browsers, and Chromium kills old computer like this old Fujitsu. 😀

                #102166
                Moderator
                Brian Masinick

                  I wholeheartedly recommend SeaMonkey when other browsers do not get the job done.

                  If even SeaMonkey has issues, you have bigger problems. One caveat seems to be that a few sites don’t work well with SeaMonkey any more, though I suspect that changing a few config values carefully can get around most of those issues. Palemoon is another alternative. Most other browsers outside of Firefox, Chrome, Chromium, Palemoon or SeaMonkey are likely to either have vulnerabilities or limitations, but that’s not to say they are useless; having a couple different browsers may be helpful for accessing certain pages in a limited capacity and using one of these others in the rest of the scenarios.

                  --
                  Brian Masinick

                  #102168
                  Moderator
                  Brian Masinick

                    I’ve updated most of my other systems on my Dell today, so I’m now here with antiX 23 in its current Alpha stage, and I’m going to see if I can successfully use it for most of the remainder of the day. I updated the system, grabbed the stats, then opened the SeaMonkey browser and I’m here now to report the previously grabbed statistics prior to opening the browser.

                    sudo ps_mem.py; pinxi -b
                     Private  +   Shared  =  RAM used	Program
                    108.0 KiB +  17.5 KiB = 125.5 KiB	runit
                    132.0 KiB +  23.5 KiB = 155.5 KiB	runsvdir
                    148.0 KiB +  29.5 KiB = 177.5 KiB	seatd
                    300.0 KiB + 109.5 KiB = 409.5 KiB	cron
                    404.0 KiB + 137.0 KiB = 541.0 KiB	svlogd (4)
                    364.0 KiB + 270.5 KiB = 634.5 KiB	udevil
                    364.0 KiB + 280.5 KiB = 644.5 KiB	icewm-session [updated]
                    436.0 KiB + 464.0 KiB = 900.0 KiB	avahi-daemon (2)
                    732.0 KiB + 251.0 KiB = 983.0 KiB	dbus-launch (2)
                    648.0 KiB + 427.5 KiB =   1.1 MiB	devmon
                    692.0 KiB + 447.5 KiB =   1.1 MiB	getty (5)
                    808.0 KiB + 408.5 KiB =   1.2 MiB	desktop-session
                    844.0 KiB + 789.0 KiB =   1.6 MiB	sudo (2)
                      1.1 MiB + 625.0 KiB =   1.7 MiB	dbus-daemon (4)
                      1.6 MiB + 332.5 KiB =   1.9 MiB	udevd
                      1.6 MiB + 433.0 KiB =   2.1 MiB	runsv (18)
                      2.0 MiB + 461.5 KiB =   2.4 MiB	bash
                      2.1 MiB + 390.5 KiB =   2.5 MiB	bluetoothd
                      2.8 MiB + 649.5 KiB =   3.5 MiB	cupsd
                      2.2 MiB +   1.3 MiB =   3.6 MiB	sshd
                      3.6 MiB + 246.5 KiB =   3.9 MiB	connmand
                      3.6 MiB + 853.5 KiB =   4.5 MiB	at-spi-bus-launcher
                      4.2 MiB + 732.5 KiB =   4.9 MiB	conky
                      4.7 MiB +   1.2 MiB =   6.0 MiB	wpa_supplicant
                      5.2 MiB +   2.6 MiB =   7.8 MiB	icewm [updated]
                      8.9 MiB +   1.5 MiB =  10.5 MiB	slimski
                     11.9 MiB +   1.6 MiB =  13.4 MiB	ntpd
                      9.9 MiB +   4.7 MiB =  14.6 MiB	zzzfm
                     12.0 MiB +   6.0 MiB =  18.0 MiB	roxterm
                     85.8 MiB +   1.7 MiB =  87.5 MiB	Xorg
                    ---------------------------------
                                            198.1 MiB
                    =================================
                    System:
                      Host: antix23 Kernel: 6.1.10-antix.1-amd64-smp arch: x86_64 bits: 64
                        Desktop: IceWM v: 3.3.2 Distro: antiX-23-runit_x64-full Grup Yorum 3
                        February 2023
                    Machine:
                      Type: Laptop System: Dell product: Inspiron 5558 v: N/A
                        serial: <superuser required>
                      Mobo: Dell model: 086DKN v: A00 serial: <superuser required> UEFI: Dell
                        v: A18 date: 12/30/2019
                    Battery:
                      ID-1: BAT0 charge: 30.1 Wh (100.0%) condition: 30.1/41.4 Wh (72.6%)
                    CPU:
                      Info: dual core Intel Core i7-5500U [MT MCP] speed (MHz): avg: 778
                        min/max: 500/3000
                    Graphics:
                      Device-1: Intel HD Graphics 5500 driver: i915 v: kernel
                      Device-2: NVIDIA GK208BM [GeForce 920M] driver: N/A
                      Device-3: Suyin Integrated_Webcam_HD type: USB driver: uvcvideo
                      Display: server: X.Org v: 1.21.1.7 driver: X: loaded: modesetting
                        unloaded: fbdev,vesa dri: iris gpu: i915 resolution: 1366x768~60Hz
                      API: OpenGL v: 4.6 Mesa 22.3.3 renderer: Mesa Intel HD Graphics 5500 (BDW
                        GT2)
                    Network:
                      Device-1: Intel Wireless 3160 driver: iwlwifi
                      Device-2: Realtek RTL810xE PCI Express Fast Ethernet driver: r8169
                      Device-3: Intel Bluetooth wireless interface type: USB driver: btusb
                    Drives:
                      Local Storage: total: 447.13 GiB used: 13.36 GiB (3.0%)
                    Info:
                      Processes: 168 Uptime: 1m Memory: 7.69 GiB used: 548.9 MiB (7.0%)
                      Shell: Bash pinxi: 3.3.25-3

                    --
                    Brian Masinick

                    #102170
                    Moderator
                    Brian Masinick

                      With SeaMonkey active and two tabs open, here’s the updated usage, pretty reasonable:

                      sudo ps_mem.py
                       Private  +   Shared  =  RAM used	Program
                      108.0 KiB +  17.5 KiB = 125.5 KiB	runit
                      132.0 KiB +  22.5 KiB = 154.5 KiB	runsvdir
                      148.0 KiB +  28.5 KiB = 176.5 KiB	seatd
                      300.0 KiB + 100.5 KiB = 400.5 KiB	cron
                      404.0 KiB + 133.0 KiB = 537.0 KiB	svlogd (4)
                      364.0 KiB + 232.5 KiB = 596.5 KiB	udevil
                      364.0 KiB + 241.5 KiB = 605.5 KiB	icewm-session [updated]
                      436.0 KiB + 455.0 KiB = 891.0 KiB	avahi-daemon (2)
                      732.0 KiB + 231.0 KiB = 963.0 KiB	dbus-launch (2)
                      648.0 KiB + 419.5 KiB =   1.0 MiB	devmon
                      576.0 KiB + 498.5 KiB =   1.0 MiB	gconfd-2
                      692.0 KiB + 434.5 KiB =   1.1 MiB	getty (5)
                      808.0 KiB + 400.5 KiB =   1.2 MiB	desktop-session
                      840.0 KiB + 789.0 KiB =   1.6 MiB	sudo (2)
                        1.1 MiB + 592.0 KiB =   1.7 MiB	dbus-daemon (4)
                        1.6 MiB + 324.5 KiB =   1.9 MiB	udevd
                        1.6 MiB + 417.0 KiB =   2.0 MiB	runsv (18)
                        2.0 MiB + 453.5 KiB =   2.4 MiB	bash
                        2.1 MiB + 356.5 KiB =   2.5 MiB	bluetoothd
                        2.8 MiB + 637.5 KiB =   3.5 MiB	cupsd
                        2.2 MiB +   1.3 MiB =   3.6 MiB	sshd
                        3.6 MiB + 208.5 KiB =   3.9 MiB	connmand
                        3.0 MiB + 962.5 KiB =   4.0 MiB	at-spi-bus-launcher
                        4.2 MiB + 607.5 KiB =   4.7 MiB	conky
                        4.7 MiB +   1.2 MiB =   6.0 MiB	wpa_supplicant
                        5.2 MiB +   2.3 MiB =   7.5 MiB	icewm [updated]
                        8.8 MiB +   1.4 MiB =  10.1 MiB	slimski
                       11.9 MiB +   1.5 MiB =  13.4 MiB	ntpd
                        9.5 MiB +   4.1 MiB =  13.6 MiB	zzzfm
                       12.0 MiB +   5.3 MiB =  17.2 MiB	roxterm
                       86.8 MiB +   4.5 MiB =  91.3 MiB	Xorg
                      386.3 MiB +   8.2 MiB = 394.5 MiB	seamonkey
                      ---------------------------------
                                              594.2 MiB
                      =================================

                      --
                      Brian Masinick

                      #104375
                      Moderator
                      Brian Masinick

                        I wholeheartedly recommend SeaMonkey when other browsers do not get the job done.

                        If even SeaMonkey has issues, you have bigger problems. One caveat seems to be that a few sites don’t work well with SeaMonkey any more, though I suspect that changing a few config values carefully can get around most of those issues. Palemoon is another alternative. Most other browsers outside of Firefox, Chrome, Chromium, Palemoon or SeaMonkey are likely to either have vulnerabilities or limitations, but that’s not to say they are useless; having a couple different browsers may be helpful for accessing certain pages in a limited capacity and using one of these others in the rest of the scenarios.

                        Also, both SeaMonkey and Palemoon can be configured to behave like Firefox by using the following setting.

                        Seamonkey/Palemoon about:config to achieve Firefox behavior: general.useragent.compatMode.strict-firefox

                        general.useragent.compatMode.strict-firefox boolean true

                        To set this, in a browser tab, type about:config
                        then add the string
                        general.useragent.compatMode.strict-firefox
                        set the type to boolean, then toggle the setting to true and either restart the browser or refresh the tabs.

                        --
                        Brian Masinick

                        #104401
                        Member
                        Fenyo

                          Hello and Happy Easter Wishes for all of us, time for some old browser updates/summary update;

                          As the soil stratifies and ages with the deeper layers, I move from top to bottom with the cpu layers;

                          “Jurassic era“, the advent of SSE2-capable cpus, belonging to this family; Pentium 4 and Celeron, Mobile derivates (Willamete, Northwood, Prescott), Pentium M / Celeron M (Banias, Dothan), Core2 T2xx0 series (Yonah) and Via C7 (Esther). Although these processors are considered rather archaic nowadays, thanks to SSE2, most of today’s browsers will run on them without any modifications;
                          New Moon 32.1.0 – Based on PaleMoon 32.1.0 source code and built under CentOS 7 with fully default (SSE2 capable cpu required) settings (so if there was an official 32bit Linux Palemoon release, this build (aka NewMoon) would be as close as possible), so glibc 2.17 is the minimum requirement, and it will run on any 32bit distro 2014 or later (e.g. 14.04 (Trusty) based Ubuntu or 8 (Jessie) based Debian and newer based distros). all past and future builds will be available here
                          – Seamonkey and Firefox still produce official 32bit Linux builds, which if you are using an actively supported distro are usually available from its repo, if you are using an older one that only gets security updates (e.g. ELTS (Debian 8+) or ESM (Ubuntu 14.04.+)), they can be downloaded from the official homepages in bz2/xz compressed tarball format (Here are the FF releases and here are the Seamonkey ones)

                          “Triassic era”, the advent of SSE-capable cpus, belonging to this family; PIII (and Celeron, mobile derivates (Katmai, Coppermine, Tualatin)), Athlon-Xp/Geode NX/K7 based Sempron, Morgan or newer core Duron, Via C3 Nehemiah, usually cpus that have sse, but lack sse2 instruction set (according to the palaeontologists’ handbook :));
                          New Moon SSE 32.1.0 – Based on PaleMoon 32.1.0 source code, and built under Debian 8 (required glibc 2.19) with clang-7 so it hasnt got any newer gcc requirement, it is run by out of the box on any Debian 8 or newer 32 bit Debian based distros. all past and future builds will be available here
                          SSErpent 20230405 – Based on Basilisk 20230404 source code and built under Debian 8 (required glibc 2.19) with clang-7 so it hasnt got any newer gcc requirement, it is run by out of the box on any Debian 8 or newer 32 bit Debian based distros. all past and future builds will be available here
                          Seamonkey SSE 2.53.16 – Based on Seamonkey 2.53.16 source code and built under Debian 8 (glibc 2.19) with gcc-7 which is required to run under Debian 8/9, under Debian 10/11 based distros run by out of the box. all past and future builds will be available here
                          Firefox SSE 91.13 ESR – Based on Firefox ESR 91.13 source code and built under Debian 9 with gcc-7 which is required (glibc 2.27) to run under Debian 9, under Debian 10 based distros run out of the box and under Debian 11 based distros needs the libffi6 lib, but Debian 11 already has version 7, luckily a simple symlink fixes the issue; e.g. with “sudo ln -s /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libffi.so.7 /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libffi.so.6” command. all past and future builds will be available here

                          “Perm era”, the advent of cmov-capable cpus, belonging to this family; Pentium Pro, Pentium II (and Mendocino Celeron), Athlon (from Argon to Thunderbird), Duron (Spitfire), usually cpus that have cmov, but lack sse instruction set, a small but forward-looking family, an ancestor of every modern mammal, I want to say cpu. 🙂 ;
                          New Moon IA32 32.1.0 – Based on PaleMoon 32.1.0 source code and built under Debian 8 (required glibc 2.19) with clang-7 so it hasnt got any newer gcc requirement, it is run by out of the box on any Debian 8 or newer 32 bit Debian based distros. all past and future builds will be available here
                          Serpent IA32 20230405 – Based on Basilisk 20230404 source code and built under Debian 8 (required glibc 2.19) with clang-7 so it hasnt got any newer gcc requirement, it is run by out of the box on any Debian 8 or newer 32 bit Debian based distros. all past and future builds will be available here
                          Seamonkey IA32 2.53.16 – Based on Seamonkey 2.53.16 source code and built under Debian 8 (glibc 2.19) with gcc-7 which is required to run under Debian 8/9, under Debian 10/11 based distros run by out of the box. all past and future builds will be available here

                          to be continued in the next post (the forum engine thinks I write too much)

                          • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Fenyo.
                          • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Fenyo.
                          • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Fenyo.
                          #104402
                          Member
                          Fenyo

                            “Carbon era”, were promising in their day, but times have changed, belonging to this family; usually cpus that have 3dnow, but lack cmov instruction set, like Amd K6-x series (k6-2/k6-2+/k6-3/k6-3+, Geode LX, some Via cpus (C3 Samuel, C3 Samuel 2 and C3 Ezra);
                            NewMoon 3DNow 32.1.0 – Based on PaleMoon 32.1.0 source code and built under Debian 8 (required glibc 2.19) with clang-7 so it hasnt got any newer gcc requirement, it is run by out of the box on Debian 8. Of course it works with other 3dnow capable cpus on Debian 8 or newer 32bit Debian based distros, but this is only relevant for low-end low-clock Duron/Athlon configurations with low amount of memory, because it will probably run faster than IA32 builds. all past and future builds will be available here
                            Seamonkey 3DNow 2.53.16 – Based on Seamonkey 2.53.16 source code and built under Debian 8 (glibc 2.19) with gcc-7 which is required to run under Debian 8/9, under Debian 10/11 based distros run by out of the box, of course under Debian 9+ is only relevant for low-end low-clock Duron/Athlon configurations with low amount of memory, because it will probably run faster than IA32 builds. all past and future builds will be available here

                            I chose the Debian 8/9 base because it seems to be a sweet spot for these old cpus, so if you want to use Debian 8/9 based distros (which still receive security updates with ELTS), the above builds built under Debian 8/9, you will need to compile gcc-7 from source (except for NewMoon and Serpent), or here are the versions i have already compiled and just have to copy it under /opt (or you can also use glibc tweak or just install gcc-mozilla package from Debian 9 repo, but this is only works for Firefox and Seamonkey) ). Debian 10 and 11 already have newer compilers by default, so there’s nothing to do with this for distros based on those. All browsers are in english, but except for Serpent, which has no language files, all others the official language packs can be installed on them. All above linked browsers are in xz/bz2 compressed tarball format (so you just have to unpack and test them (e.g. run (usually with alt+f2) with /home/pathtowhereyouextracted/firefox-esr/firefox-esr), if you like you just have to create a launcher for them). Here is an example of how to create a launcher for Palemoon, obviously you have to modify the paths and the name/locations of the launcher application, but it’s good for analogy. explained another way, English is not my native language
                            Under Firefox for better performance, enable the webrender.force-disabled and the gfx.xrender.enabled option in the about:config tab, and if you have opengl 2.0 capable vga card (Ati 9500 or better, Nvidia Geforce 6 or better) enable the layers.acceleration.force-enabled and the layers.low-precision-buffer option and disable the layers.async-pan-zoom.enabled and the layers.componentalpha.enabled option (these are not stable all vga/driver combination so test it, usually openscoure Ati/Amd and proprietary Nvidia is Ok), except webrender all above these settings are also valid for Seamonkey too. Under Palemoon/Basilisk only, under the preferences advanced tab, just enable the hardware acceleration if possible option and the last 3 options mentioned above.
                            Suggested addon is ublock-origin for Firefox, and for the Palemoon/Basilsik eMatrix or ublock origin legacy and for Seamonkey only ublock origin legacy version.

                            And here’s all the stuff I pushed to archive.org.

                            • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Fenyo.
                            #104410
                            Member
                            olsztyn

                              Very interesting study of timeline of dependencies – CPUs and browsers…
                              Great resource in one place.
                              Thank you @ Fenyo!

                              Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                              http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                              #104411
                              Member
                              marcelocripe

                                And here’s all the stuff I pushed to archive.org.

                                Thank you very much!
                                Muito obrigado!

                                #106778
                                Member
                                grey_rat

                                  In Firefox 115a brought back performance for older PCs, but you need to go to about:config
                                  Tested on eeePC900 (GMA900 without support WDDM, SSE2 900Mhz CPU) windows 7.

                                  For Debian http://ftp.mozilla.org./pub/firefox/nightly/2023/05/2023-05-14-09-08-31-mozilla-central/
                                  firefox-115.0a1.en-US.linux-i686.deb
                                  firefox-115.0a1.en-US.linux-x86_64.deb

                                  Waiting for antix 23b 32 bit for tests

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