[Solved] Can't Connect With USB 2.0 To Ethernet Adapter

Forum Forums Official Releases antiX-17 “Heather Heyer, Helen Keller” [Solved] Can't Connect With USB 2.0 To Ethernet Adapter

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  • This topic has 10 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated Nov 1-9:13 pm by BitJam.
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  • #1339
    Member
    Avatarrfinco

    I tried antiX 17 32-bit full on several older PCs, a Pentium II, 2 Pentium IIIs, and an old K7 Athlon. None of these PCs have onboard ethernet ports. I use an AmazonBasics USB 2.0 to 10/100 Ethernet LAN Network Adapter to connect to the network. The adapter uses an ASIX AX88772B chip. Antix 17 won’t make a connection to the network with this adapter. Antix 16.1 & 16.2, Lubuntu 17.10, and BunsenLabs 20160710 all connect correctly with the adapter.

    dmesg shows that the adapter gets registered OK, but doesn’t show the adapter being brought “up”.

    lsusb shows an entry for the adapter.

    ifconfig doesn’t show the adapter at all.

    Conky doesn’t show the 2 network graphs.

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by rfinco.
    #1347
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    I have the same problem here with two different usb internet dongles. They worked fine in earlier versions of antiX-17. The problem now may be due to the directory /sys/class/net/eth0 directory not appearing and instead a directory with a “unique name” appears which I think fools our networking startup scripts.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by BitJam.

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

    #1349
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    Okay, I have an easy work-around for you. Run “sudo ceni” (or select ceni from the network tab of the control centre) and select the “ethernet” interface with the ridiculously long name from “Hardware interfaces” and then select “accept” in the next screen. That should be enough to bring your network up and allow it to be brought up again on subsequent boots (on installed systems or live-usbs, not live-cd/dvds).

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

    #1365
    Member
    fatmacfatmac

    I think trying to use ceni also fixed my internal wifi.
    I set it up using wicd, two or three times, on my netbook, but on rebooting, I had to reconfigure it.
    But yesterday, I tried with ceni as well, & today it auto started my wifi. So, even when I had marked it to automatically start my wifi, it didn’t – until after I had tried using ceni, now it starts automatically.
    (I’m guessing that ceni creates a file that wicd/AntiX can use.)

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #1405
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    Most likely the problem with wicd is the wicd service is disabled by default. On a live system use the “wicd” cheat (which is also available in the F4 Options menu). On an installed system edit the file /etc/default/wicd and change a line to:

    START_DAEMON=yes

    I was planning to do this automatically when wicd was launched from the Control Centre but I ran out of time and energy.

    Edit: even a single set of [ code ] tags failed to work.

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

    #1408
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalistaanticapitalista

    [code]hello[/code]

    hello

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by anticapitalista.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by anticapitalista.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by anticapitalista.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #1434
    Moderator
    Brian MasinickBrian Masinick

    Most likely the problem with wicd is the wicd service is disabled by default. On a live system use the “wicd” cheat (which is also available in the F4 Options menu). On an installed system edit the file /etc/default/wicd and change a line to:

    START_DAEMON=yes

    I was planning to do this automatically when wicd was launched from the Control Centre but I ran out of time and energy.

    Edit: even a single set of [ code ] tags failed to work.

    BitJam, I sure HEAR you loud and clear when it comes to “running out of time and energy”! In years past I’ve been able to do quite a bit of testing and at times I’ve been able to help out with documentation as well; just don’t have that kind of available time these days either.

    One thing I would really LOVE to see in whatever networking facilities we provide and install is a little bit of “extra” automatic or semi-automatic configuration. I know that wicd does not automatically populate itself with the name of the wireless interface – such as wlan0 or whatever it might be on a particular system, but it seems to me that a moderate amount of code, executed either during installation, configuration, or performed by a script ought to be able to determine what network interfaces are available and add these settings to the networking tools we use. If we’re ever able to add such things to our distribution, I think it would be one more great feature that not very many systems have, and unless I’m incredibly naive, I don’t think it would be terribly difficult to code, which makes me surprised that it’s not something commonly seen. Maybe in other distributions that use network manager or some other packaged interface, someone has thought of this, but I’ve not seen it on most of the distributions I’ve recently used, so I think that it’d be a great idea. If I DO come up with some time to contribute, by all means I’ll do it; meanwhile anyone who wants to run with the idea is encouraged to think about how to create a nice solution for simplifying initial wireless network configuration.

    Brian Masinick

    #1439
    Member
    fatmacfatmac

    ‘Slightly off topic’ OpenBSD does configure your network when you do an istallation, & uses it to download/update some drivers, so it must be a possibility, but likely it is the few doing all the coding that are pushed for time. Wish I was cleverer than I am. 😉

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #1449
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    [code] hello [/code]

    hello

    Ah, you seem to be saying that code tags are broken but html and back-tics work. Thanks. So the message that says “You can use BBCodes to format your content” is wrong.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by BitJam.

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

    #1632
    Member
    Avatarrfinco

    Bitjam: Thanks a bunch for the tip. That worked.

    A couple of things:

    I had to double click on the ethernet interface name to advance to the next page.

    I did your procedure during a live session, which got the USB/ethernet connection working. Then from the same live session, I installed to HDD with the new connection up, and found that the connection persists in subsequent boots from the newly installed antiX 17.

    Cool!!!

    #1637
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    I’m glad you got it to work. If you were using a live-usb then the connection would persist across reboots of the live-usb as well.

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

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