Could anyone please briefly outline process from SID Core to SID Base

Forum Forums News Sid Upgraders Could anyone please briefly outline process from SID Core to SID Base

  • This topic has 59 replies, 9 voices, and was last updated Dec 4-4:30 am by BobC.
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  • #94614
    Member
    olsztyn

      Objective:
      Taking the published antiX22 SID Core as published by anticapitalista, what would be the best sequence of steps to build it up, either to SID Base or even Full?
      This question arises from apparent lack of SID Base version so far and considering antiX 23 plans I believe SID base would help as new baseline of antiX for early experimentation…
      Any advice will be greatly appreciated…

      Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
      http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

      #94633
      Forum Admin
      rokytnji

        Well. In my how to tell what packages you have installed.

        I made a public pastebin link to show what was installed in my full iso install.

        Might help. Might not.

        https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/command-to-find-what-is-installed-on-your-system/

        Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
        I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute off it.
        Motorcycle racing is rocket science.

        Linux Registered User # 475019
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        #94635
        Member
        olsztyn

          Well. In my how to tell what packages you have installed.

          Thank you @rokytnji. Every little bit helps.
          I am digging out old posts by @seaken64 to learn from his experience in building from antiX Core…

          Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
          http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

          #94636
          Moderator
          Brian Masinick

            Another completely different technique I’ve used in the past is to select a core group of packages, particularly “metapackages”, which tend to install a group of packages, and also some key packages, which have a fairly large list of dependencies.

            If you think about the primary applications you use a lot, put their package names into a file, then save it in Webmail, on a removable drive, or even a forum tool – anything where you can retrieve them. Then when you build a new system, you can use the package list to install at least a basic system; I used to do this when I was frequently building custom antiX Core images. It takes some thought and some planning, and if you’ve never done it before, it may take a few tries, but once you put the right list together, you can reuse it, again and again, when you install different systems.

            This is even easier when you’re using a desktop environment because desktop environments tend to have convenient metapackages.
            Various Ubuntu variations have a few metapackages that install an entire desktop environment, and subsets of them that install major subcomponents of environments, but their metapackages tend to throw the entire environment in; it’s convenient but contrary to the lean behavior we use; so your package list will probably have to specify quite a few things. However, if you choose the right metapackages for the graphical environment, for example, the RIGHT metapackage MIGHT get you most of what you want with only a few entries, so a bit of research helps too.

            General comments, not a lot of specific commands, but this general approach is worth thinking about, researching, planning, and building a list of what you want. In the long run, if you tend to install and replace stuff frequently it can come in really handy!

            --
            Brian Masinick

            #94638
            Member
            olsztyn

              Another completely different technique I’ve used in the past is to select a core group of packages, particularly “metapackages”

              Thanks Brian…
              This will probably be my next (future to come soon) experience. Until then I want to be very careful what I install, step by step and establish a minimum baseline…
              Thanks for the info…

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by olsztyn.

              Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
              http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

              #94640
              Member
              stevesr0

                Hi olsztyn,

                As a noobie, I feel presumptuous in offering a comment, but <g>…

                I have been running a “minimalistic” Sid system for over a year. I started (IIRC) with net and added openbox and X. Then individual packages as I felt I needed/wanted them.

                Obviously, this is different from creating a Sid “base” or “full” starting with core. As rokytnji said, if you literally want to duplicate the packages in base or full, you need to get a list of what is present in those versions and just install them. There have been several posts over the years about listing the packages in each version. From there you could determine the “missing” packages.

                I have the feeling I am not clearly understanding you question, perhaps.

                stevesr0

                #94641
                Member
                olsztyn

                  I made a public pastebin link to show what was installed in my full iso install.

                  Thanks again, @rokytnji…
                  Your process to list installed packages is very helpful to identify what needs to be installed.
                  On the second thought though I am not sure I want to literally duplicate Base composition as it normally comes pre-defined with antiX. I will probably carefully select a subset of only ‘core’ packages from the list. This is not to say there are redundant packages in the Base or Full install of antiX, just for the rudimentary testing I might omit certain packages, thust reducing from the ultimate completeness of the ‘normal’ Base or Full.
                  I still need to think about it…
                  Thanks and Regards…

                  Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                  http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                  #94642
                  Member
                  olsztyn

                    Obviously, this is different from creating a Sid “base” or “full” starting with core.

                    Thank you @stevesr0…
                    Actually, I realize I was not clear after all… My objective is to compose only an approximation of Base or Full in SID world. This would not be re-creation of what anticapitalista provides as a complete Base or Full releases. I am not trying to duplicate anticapitalista’s ultimate creation, but have a basic system for initial testing.
                    I will likely omit various similar purpose packages, tailoring to my machine just what I would focus on testing. So, as an example I will likely omit various legacy Internet browsers, just to focus on core single one.
                    In this respect it seems a similar approach as yours…

                    Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                    http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                    #94643
                    Moderator
                    christophe

                      I like to make my core systems even more minimal than base, because I don’t think we an get any better than antiX (base/full) itself.
                      So, I don’t know if this is something that will help, but I’ll tell you what I do:
                      I run the apt update, then run:
                      sudo apt install xorg xserver-xorg-legacy xinit roxterm-gtk2 conky-legacy-all jwm volumeicon-alsa-legacy acpi pmount feh
                      (This gets the basics, a good minimal window manager, conky, terminal — just basics.)
                      Then add whatever programs you use.
                      Edit your /etc/X11/Xwrapper.config.
                      Add at the bottom of the file:
                      needs_root_rights=yes

                      Copy /etc/jwm/system.jwmrc to /home/demo/.jwmrc
                      (assuming you’re running live.)

                      You’ll have to edit it by hand, to add/remove/change it. It’s like the antiX base/full versions, but all in one file.
                      “man jwm” will be helpful here.
                      Run startx to start X at any point after you have installed the basics & have edited Xwrapper.conf.
                      I hope this helps, my friend. 🙂

                      • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by christophe.

                      confirmed antiX frugaler, since 2019

                      #94646
                      Member
                      olsztyn

                        I like to make my core systems even more minimal than base, because I don’t think we an get any better than antiX (base/full) itself.
                        So, I don’t know if this is something that will help, but I’ll tell you what I do:

                        Thank you @Christophe.
                        This is my thinking too. I am not re-creating the exact Base or Full to be. Just an approximation but using just single selection of key core apps for testing purpose on my mainstream laptops.
                        I think the process you outlined above is the set of steps to create such minimal base I was looking for. Plus selection of key packages for early testing ahead of future to come…
                        Thanks and Regards.

                        Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                        http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                        #94648
                        Moderator
                        Brian Masinick

                          I like to make my core systems even more minimal than base, because I don’t think we an get any better than antiX (base/full) itself.
                          So, I don’t know if this is something that will help, but I’ll tell you what I do:
                          I run the apt update, then run:
                          sudo apt install xorg xserver-xorg-legacy xinit roxterm-gtk2 conky-legacy-all jwm volumeicon-alsa-legacy acpi pmount feh
                          (This gets the basics, a good minimal window manager, conky, terminal — just basics.)
                          Then add whatever programs you use.
                          Edit your /etc/X11/Xwrapper.config.
                          Add at the bottom of the file:
                          needs_root_rights=yes

                          Copy /etc/jwm/system.jwmrc to /home/demo/.jwmrc
                          (assuming you’re running live.)

                          You’ll have to edit it by hand, to add/remove/change it. It’s like the antiX base/full versions, but all in one file.
                          “man jwm” will be helpful here.

                          I hope this helps, my friend. ????

                          Similar to the packages I have used to build a Core system.

                          --
                          Brian Masinick

                          #94650
                          Member
                          olsztyn

                            Just to report first setback:
                            startx does not work as expected. Fails with the following:

                            xinit: giving up
                            xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
                            xinit: server error

                            I have a feeling this might be related to Runit as init, but I hope it is not… Based on antiX 22 Runit Core.
                            Not sure how to proceed.
                            This is an example why I miss antiX SID Base (or about that) in SID antiX inventory of ISOs…

                            Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                            http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                            #94651
                            Member
                            andyprough

                              Did you do the thing that Christophe said? You have to do it for startx to work:

                              Edit your /etc/X11/Xwrapper.config.
                              Add at the bottom of the file:
                              needs_root_rights=yes

                              #94655
                              Moderator
                              christophe

                                Also, if you have an Intel video card, install xserver-xorg-video-intel. See if that’s missing for some reason.

                                confirmed antiX frugaler, since 2019

                                #94656
                                Moderator
                                BobC

                                  If you had a matching antiX 22 (ie sysvinit or runit with same architecture 32/64) installed, you could try my packagecomp utility to find out what packages you are missing and it writes an install script that you just copy/paste and run. I think its setup for geany, but you could change that to mcedit or other editor that doesn’t require X. I’ve never tried it for core or base, but don’t see any other reason it wouldn’t work. I’ve been using it a few years now.

                                  https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/upgrading-from-antix-19-to-antix-21/#post-85438

                                  After I did it, it didn’t finish dpkg, which I found out when trying to reinstall a package. I had to reboot and complete the dpkg run. Once that completed, I ran adduser to create another user, and it created the correct menu etc. So if I was doing it again, I would install core as a dummy user, and then add my real user in the adduser step at the end, unless I knew an easy way to get everything in my /home directory the way it should be after the fact.

                                  I used antiX 64 runit base and antiX sid 64 runit core for my test.

                                  • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by BobC.
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