[SOLVED]: Does your CPU temperature reach 90°C or above?

Forum Forums General Hardware [SOLVED]: Does your CPU temperature reach 90°C or above?

  • This topic has 24 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated Oct 11-8:01 pm by Brian Masinick.
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  • #60996
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    Koo
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    If you use Arctic Silver just be careful not to use to much as it is electrically conductive, where MX-4 are NT-H1 are not..
    And if you are worried about the fan over spinning? (never seen this before) just put your thumb on top of the fins to stop the fan spinning.

    Have good look through the copper fins to make sure there is not a blanket of dust stuck between the back of the fins and fan blades. After cleaning.

    anitX 19.4 - Core 5.10.57-antix.1-amd64-smp
    Asus B450-I , Ryzen 5 3600 , RX5600XT , 32gb 3200 , WD Black 500GB M.2 NVMe ..

    #61166
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    rayluo
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    Thanks for all the valuable input. I’ve managed to solve the problem. And, my way to say thank-you is to provide a summary of know-how to help future readers who encounters the same issue.

    1. First thing first, how to confirm whether your computer has an overheat problem? Feeling the air coming out from fan is unreliable (even more unreliable than simply touching the exterior of your device), presumably because a clogged fan/ventilation would pump out less air/heat. You should rely on quantitative readings from your computer’s sensor. And antiX happens to provide a command-line program named “sensors” that can tell you not only the CPU’s current temperature, but also reference numbers on what is considered high and what is considered critical. When your CPU’s temperature is reaching the critical temperature, your computer would automatically shut down.

    2. The same “sensors” tool can also give you the reading on fan speed. My fan has 3 or 4 thousands RPM. I’m no fan expert, but with that speed, I believe the fan still has plenty of life in it.

    3. As Brian, Robin, olsztyn quickly pointed out, the most frequent reason is probably simply dust building up. This would be easy to check, after you open your computer to expose the fan. No surprise here for my computer. I found excess dust clogging the center of the fan. Cleaning them off was easy. It did not require compressed air (nor do I have any in hand). However, after brushing them off and then re-test with step 1, it provided no improvement.

    4. At this point, it was tempting to remove the entire fan+heatsink for some deep cleaning, which would also require replacing the thermal paste. But I remembered that Moddit said “up to now never needed to change thermal paste on T series laptop”, so I tried touching the away-from-cpu end of the heatsink. It felt scorching hot, so I believed the existing thermal paste is still functioning. Then I decided against removing the heatsink. (I already ordered a new thermal paste online, but it was still on the way anyway.) So, what is next?

    5. Typically, there would be no obvious dust observable from the exterior of the venting port or the venting fins, because the dust would accumulate on the side of air intake i.e. the side adjacent to the fan. On my model (a Thinkpad T430), the inside of venting fins are invisible and inaccessible (unless I would remove and disassemble the heatsink, which I chose not to). It turned out, a close look between each venting fins from the outside would reveal some grey web-like built-up at the other end of the fins. They must clog up the air flow.

    6. Now the solution became clear. From outside of the venting port, used some needle-like object to poke into each gap between every 2 fins and reached the other side, and then slided up-and-down to loose and break the built-up at the other end. This approach would not clean 100% of the dust out, but it turned out good enough to reopen the air channel. It is just physics, after all. After the treatment, my computer remains 60 to 70 degrees during normal run, and can sustain hours-long 1080p video playing with the CPU temperature peaked at around 80 degrees. I consider it a great success.

    Today my order of thermal paste also arrives. But now I decide to return it. 🙂

    Thank you again for all your wisdom along the journey.

    #61167
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    calciumsodium
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    Hi @rayluo,
    Thanks for sharing the solution to this laminar air flow problem.

    #61168
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    olsztyn
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    Congrats rayluo on this accomplishment!
    Also thanks for your detailed post sharing a very logical train of thoughts to identify the issue. This logical approach led to the logical solution. I suppose removing the keyboard was easy enough, considering it is Thinkpad after all…
    Regards.

    #61210
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    rayluo
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    Congrats rayluo on this accomplishment!
    Also thanks for your detailed post sharing a very logical train of thoughts to identify the issue. This logical approach led to the logical solution.

    Thanks for the recognition.

    I suppose removing the keyboard was easy enough, considering it is Thinkpad after all…
    Regards.

    Well, I did not specifically mention the keyboard part, because that would depend on the model of your computer, and I want my summary to be as generic as possible. In my case, though, the T430 indeed requires the keyboard removal to expose the fan (i.e. the step 3 in my summary). The keyboard was tightly fit on my laptop, thus could not be removed by bare hand wiggling. It took some youtube video searching to learn a trick of using a credit card as a pry to easily pop it out. The real challenge, however, was the removal of the palm rest. My thumb nails still hurt today. 🙂

    All the info above are model-specific, so I did not put them into my summary.

    #61213
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick
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    @rayluo: You did a great job, not only of getting your problem fixed, but also of:

    1) Clearly sharing the specifics of the problem in the first place.
    2) Carefully reading and applying the suggestions that were given.
    3) Giving appropriate recognition and credit to those who helped to provide answers.
    4) Expertly documented the steps you used to solve the problem, and
    5) Getting the problem solved! Congratulations!

    Regarding the part about the sore thumbnails, I wonder if there is a good tool for dislodging and removing the thumb rest? I suspect there is.

    I believe that it was either a popular Dell model or an IBM/Lenovo Thinkpad model that my next door neighbor/hardware engineer was able to carefully disassemble and fix, all in 5 minutes. It involved removing the keyboard and synaptics, and whatever else may have been on the top (visible) layer. Many of these models have an odd combination of screws and plastic snaps, which can be frustrating for a clumsy person like me to handle, yet incredibly easy for those who do this for a living and know what they are doing!

    My complement to you is that whether you found it easy or difficult, you DID successfully accomplish the task and wrote in easy to understand words. Thank you very much! This will undoubtedly be helpful to someone along the way, whether it’s the same model or a laptop that has mostly similar parts.

    Brian Masinick

    #61223
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    rayluo
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    @rayluo: You did a great job, not only of getting your problem fixed, but also of:

    1) Clearly sharing the specifics of the problem in the first place.
    2) Carefully reading and applying the suggestions that were given.
    3) Giving appropriate recognition and credit to those who helped to provide answers.
    4) Expertly documented the steps you used to solve the problem, and
    5) Getting the problem solved! Congratulations!

    Thank you for such a list! I am flattered.

    We would also need to thank an unsung hero who marked this post as “solved”. I attempted to do so, but could not find the buttons.

    Regarding the part about the sore thumbnails, I wonder if there is a good tool for dislodging and removing the thumb rest? I suspect there is.

    I believe that it was either a popular Dell model or an IBM/Lenovo Thinkpad model that my next door neighbor/hardware engineer was able to carefully disassemble and fix, all in 5 minutes…

    It would indeed be easy for pros. That video provided by Koo shows the guy removing the palm rest by bare hand within 1 minute, while “bragging” how his finger nails worked so well. 🙂 While it is that easy for them, I doubt there would need to be any specific tool for this job, though I would love to be proved wrong here. 🙂

    #61224
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick
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    Yeah, that guy knows exactly what to do; he probably repairs hundreds of systems.

    I don’t know how many systems my friend worked with, but he and another guy formed their own company, and built their phone/PBX network from commodity hardware and a Linux-based PBX software configuration, so they learned both the hardware and the software.

    People like that are WAY beyond anything that I can do in either hardware or software, though at one time I was much better than I am now with software.

    Brian Masinick

    #68687
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    rayluo
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    From outside of the venting port, used some needle-like object to poke into each gap between every 2 fins and reached the other side, and then slided up-and-down to loose and break the built-up at the other end. This approach would not clean 100% of the dust out, but it turned out good enough to reopen the air channel. It is just physics, after all. After the treatment, my computer remains 60 to 70 degrees during normal run, and can sustain hours-long 1080p video playing with the CPU temperature peaked at around 80 degrees. I consider it a great success.

    My previous posts in this topic received so many attentions, so I figure I can give a quick follow-up after 4 months.

    Since my fan treatment last time at June 8th, my computer literally stays stable for 4 full months so far, because I did not even shutdown my computer since then. Even the PIDs are bumped up to 3.7 millions. Such longevity is a testament to antiX’s stability.

    
    demo@antix1:$ uptime
     00:55:49 up 125 days, 15:41,  2 users,  load average: 1.67, 1.74, 1.70
    demo@antix1:$ ps
        PID TTY          TIME CMD
    3778184 pts/6    00:00:00 bash
    3778204 pts/6    00:00:00 ps
    

    However, I also noticed that my computer’s working temperature is slowly yet steadily increasing recently, and now it climbs back to 90+°C. The reason is presumably that my treatment last time only loosened the dirt inside the vent, but did not really bring them out. So they re-form in a matter of months, rather than years. Next time when I redo the treatment, I’ll orient my computer so that its vent points downwards, in hoping that the dirt inside would fall out. We will see how that goes. (All in all, I don’t mind redoing such treatment from now and then. After all, that dirt-caused overheating symptom was the reason that I got this computer for dirt-cheap price in the first place. I can’t complain. 🙂 )

    #68729
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick
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    @rayluo: Thank you for your most recent update on systems that run hot and your temporary fixes to give those systems additional life. I’ll be interested to hear whether or not your next change to the procedure provides any additional improvements. In any case, it’s helping to keep some old systems alive and working longer, and the longer the better. Keep up the good work!

    Brian Masinick

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