ExLight Linux – Lightweight Live Distro?

Forum Forums General Other Distros ExLight Linux – Lightweight Live Distro?

  • This topic has 16 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated Dec 23-8:39 am by Brian Masinick.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #126994
    Member
    olsztyn

      I came across this distro claiming to be the ‘ultimate lightweight’ – https://exlight.exton.net/, based on Debian Trixie/SID just as antiX SID, and Enlightenment desktop 25.4 (latest).
      Having watched some of the included video in comparison to antiX:
      – antiX 23 on Enlightenment has much smaller memory footprint, particularly being elogind-free.
      – antiX 23 on Enlightenment is mature. I do not get such impression with ExLight, which fails to boot to desktop on older laptops.
      – ExLight claims it is inherently Live with Refracta Snapshot remastering. I do not think it compares to antiX Live functionality.

      People seem to publish half-cooked distros out there, which do not hold a candle to antiX…

      Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
      http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

      #126997
      Moderator
      Brian Masinick

        I came across this distro claiming to be the ‘ultimate lightweight’ – https://exlight.exton.net/, based on Debian Trixie/SID just as antiX SID, and Enlightenment desktop 25.4 (latest).
        Having watched some of the included video in comparison to antiX:
        – antiX 23 on Enlightenment has much smaller memory footprint, particularly being elogind-free.
        – antiX 23 on Enlightenment is mature. I do not get such impression with ExLight, which fails to boot to desktop on older laptops.
        – ExLight claims it is inherently Live with Refracta Snapshot remastering. I do not think it compares to antiX Live functionality.

        People seem to publish half-cooked distros out there, which do not hold a candle to antiX…

        I couldn’t agree more! Ever since anticapitalista reached out to Warren Woodford, former founder of Simply MEPIS, with the idea of antiX, I’ve followed and used it, generally keeping AT LEAST two versions around, a test version and an installed version. At this stage I have it on every non Chromebook or Android system I own, and on some of my “oldies” it’s my only system and it runs very well on every single one of them.

        As far as these other “experiments”, yeah sure, they may be “interesting”, but well tested, well designed, with a specific purpose and goal? That is questionable. At the same time, the freedom to express oneself is there, and those who want that kind of expression are free and welcome to do so. At this point, I’m not interested in testing or even looking at the vast majority of distributions; I’ve tested hundreds, and I still have quite a few CD and DVD archives that I haven’t destroyed as well as an extensive USB Flash Drive collection; no need to go that route any more… (at least for me).

        --
        Brian Masinick

        #127005
        Forum Admin
        rokytnji

          Hype is what kept me from using antiX. I don’t know about you guys. But back in the version 7 days. Online was saying antiX was only for experienced linux users.
          Me being clueless at the time. Everything I read online I considered the truth. So they scared me off for a bit.

          Strange how hype works. Just like me. A user just getting into computers and using linux. Is going to eat that hype up like I did.
          Took me some time back in my dialup days to switch from Puppy to antiX. I kept my hand in puppy for while since I was comfy in it.

          Besides. Back then. I was gear challenged.
          https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/blog/rokytnji-396422/dual-boot-install-on-compaq-1540-dm-1388/

          I guess I should reword that old saying, ” antiX is only for experienced linux users ” to ” antix makes you a experienced linux user ”

          Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
          I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute off it.
          Motorcycle racing is rocket science.

          Linux Registered User # 475019
          How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

          #127008
          Member
          olsztyn

            As far as these other “experiments”, yeah sure, they may be “interesting”, but well tested, well designed, with a specific purpose and goal? That is questionable. At the same time, the freedom to express oneself is there, and those who want that kind of expression are free and welcome to do so.

            My thinking is that some of those experiments should try to base their spins on antiX first, if not planning a different architecture as their ultimate goal. There is nothing in ExLight linux with a goal of different architecture to make a difference. Therefore there are only benefits to base such spins on antiX, which is mature base in comparison. Just to point out examples of better path:
            – Enlightenment/antiX is nothing different from ExLight Lightweight Linux except it would be a mature and rock-solid spin out of the box.
            – Initial memory footprint of antiX/Enlightenment is just about in the range 210-290 Mb, while ExLight in video is proud of exceptionally low ‘just over 400 Mb’…
            – No issues booting antiX on old machines.

            An example of proper path taken would be LocOS, which is such an antiX spin, made for Spanish speaking by locosporlinux, anticapitalista poited me to about three months ago. He made such spin from antiX, just with a few differences:
            – LXDE desktop, instead of IceWM. This kept memory footprint very low, suitable for old machines. And LXDE is rock-solid on antiX, so it is on LocOS as well.
            – I do not think LocOS is elogind-free.
            – It is still old sound technology – Puseaudio, while antiX advanced to cutting edge – pipewire with complete success after some wrinkles initially.
            – It appears to me LocOS is not keeping up with antiX advancements. Being an antiX spin it should be more on top of developments in antiX I would think…

            After anticapitalista mentioned LocOS a few months ago I tested it and the only thing from LocOS I adopted in antiX is the ‘Gold-on-Dark’ theme, which looks crisp clear, better than other dark themes. That theme was a good default choice for LocOS.

            Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
            http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

            #127014
            Moderator
            Brian Masinick

              @olsztyn

              Your points make very good sense!

              --
              Brian Masinick

              #127015
              Member
              anti-apXos

                I guess I should reword that old saying, ” antiX is only for experienced linux users ” to ” antix makes you a experienced linux user ”

                This is pretty much my experience, too. My First Linux™ was Mint exactly because everyone always recommends it for beginners, but I pretty much found it too easy I guess. I was just never really inspired to explore things like the root filesystem or use the terminal since they were hardly needed. So in the end, it pretty much felt like I was still using Windows. Switching to a supposedly “not good for beginners” distro (Bodhi Linux, in my case, and only later antiX) is what actually got me to be interested enough to really learn how Linux works and is different from Windows by doing things.

                I think too often people assume beginners don’t want a challenge, but for many a challenge is what’s compelling about something new and without it they lose interest.

                As for this ExLight distro, I haven’t tried it, but I imagine since it does things differently from antiX it probably has some advantages, even if they’re not apparent immediately or to every user. I don’t see any reason why there shouldn’t be a million distros that do things in a million different ways, since you never do know exacty what some user is going to want or need. It is too bad, I guess, when a distro does something you like but other things you feel are done better in other distros. But then maybe the solution is to make a new distro that does it all just how you want it!

                • This reply was modified 5 months ago by anti-apXos.
                #127017
                Member
                olsztyn

                  I guess I should reword that old saying, ” antiX is only for experienced linux users ” to ” antix makes you a experienced linux user ”

                  I have been antiX’ed with antiX 16 so I do not know those early days when antiX was ‘for experienced Linux users’. But antiX 16 was pretty straightforward for ordinary users the way I remember…
                  Nowaday’s antiX seems perfectly easy for ordinary users but also gives you an opportunity to experience yourself if you want to delve into some system details or to perfect it with other desktop options… I think pipewire provided some opportunities to accomplish some of the former with solutions developed by abc-nix, dbus config improvements identified by anti-apXos, etc… Some little sore-points remain to be improved, such as volumeicon too-delayed start for some users as a long-standing challenge, although might be forgotten by now…

                  • This reply was modified 5 months ago by olsztyn.

                  Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                  http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                  #127021
                  Moderator
                  Brian Masinick

                    @rokytnji “I guess I should reword that old saying, ” antiX is only for experienced linux users ” to ” antix makes you a experienced linux user ”

                    You are correct! If you are already experienced, you realize that antiX is both lean, efficient, and extensible (that means it’s easily modified.
                    One of my OLD instances of antiX Core was a personal experiment to see if I could have some versions that were super basic and simple and other versions modified into desktop environments! Turns out BOTH work fine! Some of us using old versions of MEPIS used to rework the KDE implementations, knock that stuff out and replace it with Xfce, LXDE, or something else; sometimes I’d just use IceWM. I did the reverse with antiX Core and created an Xfce implementation; I was very happy with it because it was a light, efficient version of Xfce, similar to, but lighter than the current day MX Linux.

                    These days, I don’t bother with all of that, but I can tell you it’s certainly possible; our work remains very easy to customize to individual tastes.

                    My current taste is to use a fairly stock IceWM setup, replace the Wallpaper with my favorite nature scenery, modify the toolbar with the stuff I use every day, and that’s about it. Takes just a few minutes to do this, even after a new installation.

                    antiX also makes experienced users able to tweak the system, and it also allows those of us who have done this for years to simply settle in and enjoy the ease, efficiency, and simplicity of the system.

                    --
                    Brian Masinick

                    #127022
                    Moderator
                    Brian Masinick

                      As far as I am concerned, antiX has never been particularly difficult to use, but it doesn’t coddle you or prevent you from learning and doing proper things; it turns out that anyone who is capable of typing a few simple letters and is not afraid to use a console terminal from the root user has LONG been able to manage the system. You do not even have to type in the full commands because several alias commands are already there to run the commands to update the system; all it takes is a little bit of looking around.

                      For example, open a terminal, type su, provide the root password, then type alias and press Enter; you will see what’s available!

                      --
                      Brian Masinick

                      #127023
                      Moderator
                      Brian Masinick

                        Since we’re telling tales about getting used to Linux:

                        1) I never needed to “get used to Linux” because I was a long-time UNIX user
                        going ALL the way back to 1982.
                        2) A GREAT Linux for REALLY learning it, with plenty of command line potential,
                        and a much more UNIX-like environment, at least in the early editions, was and
                        still is the outstanding Slackware.

                        If you use Slackware today with fvwm, fvwm-crystal, IceWM, Fluxbox, JWM, or
                        some simple window manager, even today it’s possible to get an experience
                        similar to ours. If you want it to be as memory conscious as our distribution,
                        you have to do similar things to what we do – install and use the leanest
                        tools and utilities and use resource intensive stuff only when you must.

                        Like many other really old distributions, this one today has lots of modern
                        conveniences, so if you are not careful with what you install and configure
                        you can end up with a large, cumbersome distribution, but with Slackware,
                        even a full-featured distribution is generally pretty clean.

                        I still prefer our distribution, but since Slackware was the VERY FIRST
                        Linux distribution I ever used, I continue to recommend it to anyone who
                        wants to learn as many features of Linux software as possible. So if
                        you are a multiple distribution user and you have not yet attempted
                        to dip your toes into one of the original distributions, give
                        Slackware a try some time, even if you don’t keep it; the way in
                        which software is installed is still quite similar to the way it
                        was from the beginning; the main differences are that the configurations
                        needed for most old and new systems are in place; the early ones you
                        sometimes had to go hunting for newer video drivers or wait for a newer
                        release to appear; those kinds of issues and challenges, as with most
                        distributions, are rarely encountered any more unless the hardware
                        you’re using is or never has been well supported.

                        I’d take a good Slackware setup any day of the week over Exlight or
                        whatever new distro of the day appears.

                        --
                        Brian Masinick

                        #127024
                        Member
                        olsztyn

                          I did the reverse with antiX Core and created an Xfce implementation; I was very happy with it because it was a light, efficient version of Xfce, similar to, but lighter than the current day MX Linux.

                          Great accomplishment. Congrats…
                          I have attempted to trim down MX, but keep it as MX, by removing the whole bunch of stuff from xdg autostart. They make it a heavy XFCE implementation. Although typical users with a newer machine probably would not notice.
                          The same I attempted to trim from MX-Fluxbox, but as well I tried to keep it as the MX, just lighter.
                          I do believe that your XFCE spin based on antiX is lighter though… Although XFCE proves too heavy in general to my taste. I much prefer Openbox/LX or Enlightenment instead, to keep memory footprint to the minimum.

                          Live antiX Boot Options (Previously posted by Xecure):
                          http://antixlinuxfan.miraheze.org/wiki/Table_of_antiX_Boot_Parameters

                          #127028
                          Moderator
                          Brian Masinick

                            I haven’t had that particular antiX Core implementation in quite a while, but once upon a time I wrote a blog article about what I did and step by step what went into it; the blog article was somewhat similar to what @christophe shared with us a few months ago, except the @christophe implementation was a much leaner one than the one I built, because my Core implementation was more an exercise to demonstrate that you can build EITHER a very lean and specific personal configuration with antiX OR you can customize it with as many features as you wish. Back then, I typically kept my desktop version of antiX Core (which was ALSO a Sid setup) across multiple releases, and then I’d install and/or update my other antiX installation each time there was a new image.

                            I do have one Core installation on my Dell Inspiron 5558; I just don’t use it very often any more.

                            --
                            Brian Masinick

                            #127029
                            Forum Admin
                            rokytnji

                              I’d take a good Slackware setup any day of the week over Exlight or
                              whatever new distro of the day appears.

                              If I did not run antiX/MX. I’d run this other one man developer in Greece release

                              https://sourceforge.net/projects/slackel/files/?source=navbar

                              I have before on my touchscreen atom clambooks and it ran really smooth.
                              Had a lot of reading up to do with pkging system though.
                              It got easier with practice.
                              It is just a live .iso slackware with a ton of slackware tools that is installable from the .iso.

                              Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
                              I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute off it.
                              Motorcycle racing is rocket science.

                              Linux Registered User # 475019
                              How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

                              #127036
                              Moderator
                              Brian Masinick

                                I’ve used Slackel; it is a useful distribution and as the description indicates, the effort takes the work from Slackware and Salix.

                                Nevertheless, from the “experienced user viewpoint”, my previous comments about UNIX, Slackware and early versions of Linux stand.
                                Slackware reminded me very much of the snappy, effective characteristics of the early UNIX systems, much like antiX does for me
                                and many others, and that’s why even though I don’t use it much any more, it still holds a place in my memories and my
                                appreciation of all that it has done for the Linux community.

                                --
                                Brian Masinick

                                #127053
                                Member
                                Wallon

                                  Are these distributions translated into other languages?
                                  If a Linux distribution doesn’t support translations, it’s much better to use an IOS or Microsoft Windows PC.
                                  Be careful, it’s not just the translations, it’s also the measurements (metres, centimetres, the size of a4 paper…) when installing the distribution!

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