GRUB won’t boot antiX 19 x64 fresh install – ext4 64-bit

Forum Forums Official Releases antiX-19 “Marielle Franco” GRUB won’t boot antiX 19 x64 fresh install – ext4 64-bit

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  • This topic has 9 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated Dec 17-2:55 pm by 3guesses.
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  • #29732
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    Hi,

    I recently downloaded antiX 19 x64 and performed a fresh install into a logical partition formatted to ext4. The install seemed to go fine but then it would not boot – GRUB reported the error:

    Error 13: Invalid or unsupported executable format

    It took a bit of detective work but eventually I came across this post:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20190522142541/https://forum.antergos.com/topic/6097/grub-error-13-invalid-or-unsupported-executable-format

    When I had done the antiX 19 x64 install I specified the ext4 file system for the installation partition but I skipped installing GRUB to the MBR as I already had Grub4Dos installed (and configured). The problem was that antiX x64 had formatted the partition to the 64-bit ext4 file system and Grub4Dos only supports the 32-bit ext4 file system – I was able to fix the problem by converting it back to 32-bit ext4 using the following command (from Puppy 8.0 x64):

    resize2fs -s /dev/sda6

    I would therefore suggest that the antiX 19 installer asks the user whether they want to use the 32-bit or 64-bit ext4 filesystem (with a brief note explaining the implications/potential problems of each) if ext4 is chosen for the installation partition. Might save others some heartache in the future.

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by 3guesses. Reason: Added missing details
    #29736
    Member
    Avatarkernelpanic

    where did you install grub? MBR or into the superblock of the (root) partition?

    #29873
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    I’m pretty sure it’s in the MBR.

    #30200
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    Was the installation location of GRUB important?

    #30203
    Moderator
    fatmacfatmac

    If you install grub to the partition you will have to use a boot loader to chainload it.

    If you installed grub to the MBR, I don’t think you would have any trouble, as it should pick up other OSes on your disk, & create entries for them.

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #30282
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    If you install grub to the partition you will have to use a boot loader to chainload it.

    If you installed grub to the MBR, I don’t think you would have any trouble, as it should pick up other OSes on your disk, & create entries for them.

    Ah, I see. I had legacy GRUB installed to the MBR, so I should have installed GRUB2 (not a fan) to the PBS and then configured legacy GRUB to chainload GRUB2. But if the antiX 19 installer had asked whether to use the 32-bit or 64-bit version of ext4 when formatting the installation partition, I could have chosen 32-bit and avoided the problem altogether – that’s really the point I’m trying to make.

    #30774
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    I have now discovered that the installers for the

      32-bit versions

    of both antiX 17.2 and antiX 19 also use the 64-bit version if you choose to format the installation partition to ext4, even on a machines with a 32-bit CPU. This intuitively seems completely wrong…

    #30831
    Member
    Avatarkernelpanic

    as far as I know legacy grub doesn´t support ext4.
    I read somewhere there is a patch for that, but I didn´t get into it, I decided to install grub2.

    I don´t like grub2 either, just look at this mess of grub.cfg compared to the good old and clean menu.lst of legacy grub, brrrr.

    I think you only have the choice …
    either stick to your installed legacy grub and restrict yourself to ext3 or, if you want to use ext4, bite into the sour apple and install grub2.

    If you found another solution, let us know. always nice to learn something about grub 😉

    #30839
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    as far as I know legacy grub doesn´t support ext4.
    I read somewhere there is a patch for that, but I didn´t get into it, I decided to install grub2.

    I don´t like grub2 either, just look at this mess of grub.cfg compared to the good old and clean menu.lst of legacy grub, brrrr.

    I think you only have the choice …
    either stick to your installed legacy grub and restrict yourself to ext3 or, if you want to use ext4, bite into the sour apple and install grub2.

    If you found another solution, let us know. always nice to learn something about grub

    Read my initial post: legacy GRUB can access/boot ext4 partitions – but only if they are the 32-bit version of ext4, not the 64-bit version. You can check if an ext4 partition has been formatted 64-bit using:

    tune2fs -l /dev/sdX | grep "features"

    If the filesystem features don’t include the text “64bit” then it is 32-bit.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by anticapitalista.
    #30841
    Member
    Avatar3guesses

    CORRECTION: I am using Grub4Dos not legacy GRUB. Apologies. Otherwise, everything else I have written still applies (mutatis mutandis, as the lawyers would say).

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