How do you access your local drive from a live disc?

Forum Forums New users New Users and General Questions How do you access your local drive from a live disc?

This topic contains 28 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by noClue Mar 14-9:02 am.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)
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  • #19044
    Member
    mattig89ch
    mattig89ch

    Hello all,

    I tried googling around, but I couldn’t find the answer to this question.

    So, I have an old computer, completely riddled with viruses. I’d like to recover some data off of it, before wiping it out. I’ve tried Q4OS, but it seems like that one has a memory leak. After an hour of copying, the machine locks up. I’d like to try antiX, and keep an eye on whats happening with the desktop resource monitors.

    My trouble is, I can’t seem to figure out how to access a local hard drive from the live disc. I booted into a vm that has files on its hard drive, but I can’t seem to get access to it.

    #19047
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalista
    anticapitalista

    Try using rox-filer as root user (I’m guessing the hard drive is ntfs formatted). Your local hard drive should show up under /media.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    #19048
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    antiX is not the greatest ‘rescue’ Linux around.

    Menu/Applications/System Tools/SpaceFM

    It should show you auto mounted HD/Partitions on the left.

    On the image:

    I accessed sda1 (root partition from installed MX) from the antiX 17.3.1 Full Live USB to ‘save’ the ‘temp.txt’ file.

    P.S.
    If that doesn’t work and since you explicitly mention ‘an old computer’, this would probably be the better bet.
    It’s old and not developed any more, but it still works fine for Windows 7 and older (no UEFI).

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

    #19051
    Member
    mattig89ch
    mattig89ch

    Thats for the responces all! But I’m a complete linux noob. So I’m not sure I’d even know where to begin doing those ideas. Also, i’d be booting from a CD. This machine is old enough, so that the bios can’t boot off USB’s. Its an XP machine, to give you some idea about age.

    #19053
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    But I’m a complete linux noob. So I’m not sure I’d even know where to begin doing those ideas.

    Going to IT specialist around the corner might be a better idea in that case. 😉

    However, here the best possible answer, without even knowing what kind of computer/configuration you are trying to retrieve the data from.
    (I saw XP, but it also depends who/which company installed it.)

    You would boot from a CD and end up at the desktop — that is, if all went well.
    Then you would see what is on my screenshot and proceed with clicking on:

    Menu/Applications/System Tools/SpaceFM

    SpaceFM (Space File Manager) would open and show what’s on my screenshot.
    On the left hand side, you would probably be able to see your OS HD.

    Anything loop, swap and such you can ignore.
    What’s important for you is sdasomeNUMBER.

    sda stands for the 1st Hard Disk, sdb for the 2nd HD, sdc for the 3rd, sdd for the 4th and so on.

    The number behind those first three letters stands for the partitions.
    Since I don’t know how your HD is/was formated, can’t tell you more.

    Normal Windows 7 installation would have 2 partitions, the first one being around 100MB in size and the other all the rest.
    Windows XP normally has only 1 partition.

    Some manufacturers include their own recovery partitions and if this is the case with your computer too, then you would have 2 partitions in XP and 3 in Windows 7.

    100MB partition in Win7 you can always ignore — you’d want the biggest one, so very probably sda2 or sda3.
    In your case of XP, it’s sda1 or sda2 (if there is recovery partition installed).
    Again the biggest partition is usually the one that contains your data.

    Your CD with antiX should show as sdb and some number.
    sr0 is a CD/DVD drive.

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

    #19054
    Member
    Avatar
    seaken64

    Well, I love antiX and can follow NoClue’s guide. But if I were you I would use a Puppy CD to get at that data. Puppy will make it easier to “Mount” the drive your data is on.

    Or Knoppix.

    Of course just mounting the drive and seeing the data is only half the battle. You still need to get the data to another disk. Does the XP machine have a USB port? If so you can also mount a blank USB drive to copy to. You mentioned that you were copying with Q4OS so I assume you have that part worked out.

    Ok, I re-read your last post and you did mention a USB (the computer doesn’t boot from USB). You could try Plop to use a single USB. But Plop might be a little difficult also. I would use Puppy CD and a USB key in the USB port.

    Seaken64

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by seaken64.
    #19057
    Forum Admin
    rokytnji
    rokytnji

    I may be in the same boat. But on a Newer Asus Windows 10 laptop my wife uses for her work.
    Won’t boot anymore.
    Bios sees the hard drive.

    There is a F key mount all option during the 1st live boot screen. I will probably use that. Like Anti said. Everything should show up in /media.

    harry@biker:~
    $ cd /media
    harry@biker:/media
    $ ls
    E10C-A032

    To make sure I have ntfs file support installed during my live session. Since I use full isos. It is usually a given thing ntfs support is installed.

    $ apt-cache policy ntfs-3g
    `

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by rokytnji.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #19060
    Forum Admin
    rokytnji
    rokytnji

    Yeah. For XP. Recent Puppy live isos are beginner friendly
    Since I am doing the wifes Windows 10 laptop.
    I’ll stick with what I have.
    But for the OP. It is viable.

    I got a old parted magic live usb also for tasks like this.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #19062
    Member
    mattig89ch
    mattig89ch

    I actually wanted to use antix, because of the destkop resource monitors. Reminds me of the old DSL.

    Does puppy linux use a whole lot less resources out of the box?

    #19065
    Member
    Avatar
    seaken64

    I actually wanted to use antix, because of the destkop resource monitors. Reminds me of the old DSL.

    Does puppy linux use a whole lot less resources out of the box?

    I only suggested Puppy because it easier to mount windows drives when you are new to Linux. But if you want to stay with antiX then you should go ahead and stay with antiX. You will learn alot. NoClue and roky have given good advice.

    Seaken64

    #19067
    Forum Admin
    dolphin_oracle
    dolphin_oracle

    from the live-USB, if you use “mount=all” option, then everything will be mounted and available on boot. under /media I think.

    #19069
    Member
    caprea
    caprea

    You get to the mount=all option by pressing the F4-key,on the live-bootscreen

    #19071
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    @ roky

    With Windows 10 you need to be carefull to perform the FULL shutdown first, before you touch any files. Be warned.

    Full shutdown (admin cmd):

    shutdown /s /f /t 0

    After the FULL shutdown, you can start fiddleing with files.

    You can easily use Linux Mint 19.1 (or Ubuntu 18.04.x) or take Win PE based boot media.

    https://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

    #19081
    Forum Admin
    rokytnji
    rokytnji

    Does puppy linux use a whole lot less resources out of the box?

    Depends. Puppy usually boots into using ram so you can pull the live media. There is a Puppy boot cheat code to not do this.
    Read this:
    https://puppylinux.org/wikka/BootParametersPuppy

    I am hip noclue on Windows 10 hibernation issues and linux. Thanks for the tip.I am still waiting on my lovable control freaks permission to put my big ham grubby fingers on her laptop yet though.

    I keep some isos like Hirens on a 1 TB drive. I used to use the cloud . But my Iso files started to disappear when sites went down.
    Ubuntu Cloud. Mega. So I decided to just use hard storage.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #19082
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    @ roky

    As long as you stay hard, you’re on the safe side. 😉

    🙂 🙂 🙂

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

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