How-to install applications – 2020 version

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  • #32908
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    This entry has been marked spam or hidden multiple times. Send mailto masinick AT yahoo DOT com if it happens again. Thanks!

    How to install applications/software on antiX (2020 version):

    You have recently found out about Linux or antiX in particular and you want to know how to install new software?

    As almost everything in Linux in general and antiX in particular, there’s many ways to do stuff.

    1- Use “Package Installer” ( available in: Menu – Control Centre – System tab):

    It’s like a small “antiX app store” – it has a list of over a hundred of the most installed software applications, divided into categories, searchable by application name (but not discription) – almost any browser you can think of, WINE, Steam, Java, VLC, language packages, are all installable from there, using a single click- the user usually does not have to interact with the terminal. A terminal black window pops up and closes automatically after the install process finishes. Usually if there’s any kind of question the user has to answer during the install process, simply press one of the keys the window shows in order to proceed (the “enter” key usually accepts the default answer).
    Note: During some particular installations (like Virtualbox) the user needs to accept some kind of License Agreement that appears on that window- use the “tab” key highlights the correct option and accept it by pressing the “enter” key)
    Pros: easy to use, makes many general use applications installable with a single click.
    Cons: newbies may find the interface a bit spartan, without icons or screen shots.

    2- Use Synaptic package manager ( also available, among other places, in: menu – Control Centre – System tab ):

    This is a very powerful application that allows you to install and manage any software application available from the Debian repositories- there are many tens of thousands available.
    A repository is a collection of software packages for a Linux distribution. antiX is based in Debian, so it uses the Debian repositories and it’s own antiX repository.
    – To search for a application click to magnifying glass icon on the upper right side of the window (you can search for the application name or it’s description -ex: “vlc” or “media player”).
    – A small search window pops up – enter the application (package) you want to search there and press the magnifying glass icon available on that window
    – Wait a few moments for Synaptic to show you the results of the search- they are presented on the right hand side of the main window. If you have to, scroll down the results of your search, until you find the application(s) you want to install- you can install more than one application or package at the same time.
    – Right click the file(s) you want to install and select “Mark for installation”. If that file needs to some other files in order to run, Synaptic will tell you exactly what else needs to be installed and offers to install those files. If that happens you have to explicitly click the “mark” those extra files in order to continue the install process.
    – Once you selected everything you want to install, click the “Gears” icon (Apply) on the top of Synaptic’s window. A confirmation pop up window will inform you exactly how many files will be downloaded, their size what the space they will use on your hard drive after installation. Click the “Apply” button and wait for the installation to finish. The new application appear automatically on the menu.

    Pros: many thousands of applications available. Does not require using the terminal at all. Installs probably anything you may need. Safe to user, does not in any way harm your system.
    Cons: can be a bit overwhelming to new users because it does not only show applications but their dependencies, and also fonts, drivers, etc. Does not automatically show any graphical previews of the applications ( no pretty pictures or videos to see, like in mobile app stores) BUT you can select your application and try using the “get screenshot” button to… well, try to get a screenshot of that application…

    3- Use cli-aptiX :

    If you are not afraid to use the keyboard and are not deterred by a general interface that basicaly remains unchaged for decades, open a terminal and run cli-aptiX
    It’s a gem! It’s as friendly as a keyboard only application can be: it offers to automaticaly update the database of system files (perform a apt update), and then allows you to install applications, either terminal or GUI, has a huge curated list of applications, and allows the user to search by application name or description!
    Pros: ease of use, excellent list of curated software, allows user to search for and install applications from the Debian Repositories
    Cons: terminal only, no mouse input

    4- Use Appimages :

    It’s a “universal” application format this means it’s meant to run in almost any Linux system [there are some “universal” formats, but the most well known are Snaps, Flatpaks and Appimages].
    Simply download the file, make it executable and run it (example: Open SpaceFm, navigate to where your Appimage is, right click it – Properties – Permissions – Make sure that the executable field is checked. You only have to do this once. Then every time you want to run the application simply right click it choose the option to run it).
    No installation needed!
    There are on-line Appimages application stores – this makes it easy to search for what you want. they have descriptions of the applications and usually a screenshot.
    Good places to find Appimage applications:
    https://appimage.github.io/ (it has almost 1000 applications at this time)
    https://www.appimagehub.com/ (it has almost 700 applications at this time)
    Some software applications “vendors”, like the LibreOffice webpage, offer Appimage versions of their applications directly.
    Pros: one application, one file. If you want to remove the application, just delete the file. Can’t harm your system. The worst it can happen is that the application needs some dependency that’s not available and refuses to run.
    Cons: you have to manually make the Appimage file executable once you download it – this can be boring but it’s a security feature and only has to be done once for each Appimage file! Some Appimages do not offer to automatically get added to the menu. Some Appimages to no warn of upgrades. Can be hard to make files automatically run with a Appimage application (easily solvable file association problems)
    Appimages can be huge (because they pack almost everything they need to run) and a bit slower starting, particularly on low powered machines (because they have to be unpacked. If that’s a problem for you, you can extract any Appimage and simply run the application directly).

    5- Use Flatpaks :

    It’s another universal application format.
    First you need to install the flatpak application itself, then you can install applications packaged in flatpak format. If you download a flatpak file for the application you want, it’s a tiny file. You then can run flatpak to install it – it connects to the server and downloads the needed files.
    There are some on-line flatpak “application stores” too.
    Where to find flatpak applications:
    https://flathub.org/home
    Pros: on the user side, you only need to install a single file. Can’t harm your system, the worst that can happen is that the application can’t run.
    Cons: at first run flatpak needs to install many hundreds of Mb of dependencies, and only then you can install applications in flatpak format.
    there are some integration problems with flatpak applications (example: they sometimes don’t match with system decorations, etc).
    It can be a bit tricky knowing how to run apps that are not added to the menu.

    6- Manually install files :

    6.1- “.run” applications or compressed binaries (like “.tar.bz”):

    Some software is available as compressed binaries like “.tar.bz” – just uncompress it and run the executable file.
    You can get the most recent Mozilla FireFox version in this format.
    Pros: safe to use, can’t, as far as I know, break your system (but can perform, as any software, malicious actions).
    Easy and safe to uninstall- simple delete the uncompressed files!
    Cons: you have to manually setup menu entries and file associations.

    “.run” applications – almost the same as above, but automaticaly install everything the application need to run once you execute this kind of “installer”.
    Some device drivers come in this format.
    Cons: as far as I know this can break your system. Try to install only files you know are safe (this is a univerally good advice).

    6.2- .deb files :

    “.deb” files are the packages that Debian, and Debian based distros use to install software. They work almost like “.msi” files available for MS Windows.
    Synaptic and package installer simply automate the process of installing .deb files for you.
    Manually installing these files can harm your system and make it unable to run. Do not try to use Ubuntu PPA’s! Do not try to use software that needs systemd – those probably won’t work with antiX and can harm your System.
    Do you need a particular software unavailable in Package Installer or Synatic?- Ask in the forum, so the Development team tries to add it to antiX and wait for a reply.
    That said, you can install thousands of .deb files in antiX! Simply download the file you want and open it in a file manager- a application called gdebi will try to install that file, or you can install it using the terminal.
    Software from the Debian.org is as safe to install as it can be (as long as it does not depend on systemd). Open your web browser to https://packages.debian.org/stable/ and select the application you want – they are organized into categories.
    Note: If a application is in debian.org, probably it’s better to install the very same application from Synaptic- it takes care of everything for you and avoids any complication.
    Pros: debian.org is not a web site filled with eye candy, but it has many, many application screen shots availble. click the name of the application you want. On the upper right corner you’ll probably see a clickable thumbnail of the application, if one is available.
    Sometimes there are .deb applications that run fine in antiX but are not officially available.
    Cons: you have to find the file you want and install it yourself. You may have to hunt down and manually install all the dependencies your application needs to run. This can often lead to what is know as “dependency hell”- you keep installing dependencies, that need other dependencies to run, that need other depencies to run…
    Can break your system!!!

    7- Use Windows applications :

    Windows software does not run in Linux but, you can try using a compatibly layer to try to run it – it’s called WINE, and it’s a handy application to always have installed. There are thousands of windows applications that run in Wine, some even faster than they run in Windows itself!
    A more compatible, but slower option to legally run windows applications, is downloading a free MS Windows virtual machine and using it to run that particular option in antiX. This takes a lot of storage space and is slow. Low powered computers probably can’t even run a MS Windows virtual machine due to CPU and RAM constraints.

    8- Play Windows Steam Games :

    Last time I checked https://www.protondb.com/ there were about 6500 games available in STEAM that run in Linux. Activate Proton in your Steam client and just install any compatible game!
    Cons: If your computer is so low powered that you choose to install antiX to make it usable, there aren’t many Steam games that can run comfortably in your system. If you have a new(ish) computer, you’re probably ok.

    9 – Compile applications from the source code :

    If you don’t even know what this means, don’t even try it.

    10 – Run old DOS applications :

    They run out of the box in antiX- DosBox has that covered- if you don’t know to use it, search on-line for help… It’s pretty intuitive.
    PROS: very nearly 100% compatibility rate.

    11- Run On-line applications :

    General rule of thumb- if a web application runs, it runs well in Linux (probably it’s even housed in a server that runs Linux too).
    You can use any Google service, Youtube, LYBR, Microsoft Office 365 on-line, Netflix, etc. It’s one of the of the benefits of having Web standards (you may need to run the web application in a particular browser, like for example- the browser needs to support DRM to enable some video streaming, like Netflix and HBO)…
    CONS: I believe that at the present time video acceleration still does not work in Linux browsers out of the box. If you have a low powered CPU, video decoding or 3d video can slow to a crawl, because your system isn’t using any GPU processing power).

    12- Run applications using emulators :

    On antiX you can play, for example PlayStation 2 disks using a emulator. There’s also a free Windows 95 emulator for Linux (with dubious legal status).

    Applications that DO NOT RUN in antiX:

    – Generally speaking Windows applications or applications made for other OS’s (like MacOS, android, etc). A different subject is applications that have cross platform versions (i.e. have different versions, available for Windows and Linux – like Google Chrome/Chromium, LibreOffice, Firefox, Thunderbird and VLC )
    – Applications packaged in a package format other than “.deb” or any universal application file format (there are more than appimage and flatpak)
    – Snaps are unable to be installed in antiX because they depend on systemd, that is not present in antiX (you may run MX-Linux and choose to use systemd at the boot process for these applications).

    To finish up:

    There are many on-line sites that you can use to search for Linux applications. My personal favorite is:
    https://www.pling.com/
    It has many Appimages available, it offers a Appimage of the store web application, very handy to use.
    Also App Outlet has a Appimage “Store” available, that shows Appimage and flatpak applications, that you can then download to your computer and use.

    This “how to” is meant for newbies. More advanced users can, of course install software using the terminal ( the “apt install” command)

    P.

    • This topic was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by PPC.
    • This topic was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by PPC.
    • This topic was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by masinick.
    #32917
    Forum Admin
    rokytnjirokytnji

    All the gaming I used to do on my IBM T23 was dosbox stuff.

    But. I am a simple soul.

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    I'm not outa place. I'm from outer space.

    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #32920
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    @Rokytnji – Nods… Now the internet archive has almost every single DOS game I remember playing, and lots more I never knew, available! And also almost every single MAME ROM too… Handy if you want to play Mortal Kombat, Tekken, Super Street Fighter, Metal Slug, Pang, Puzzle Bubble… – now that’s a way to kill time (and destroy the keyboard) 🙂

    P.

    #32945
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    How to install applications/software on antiX (2020 version):

    You have recently found out about Linux or antiX in particular and you want to know how to install new software?

    As almost everything in Linux in general and antiX, there’s many ways to do most things:

    1- Use “Package Installer” ( available in: Menu – Control Centre – System tab):
    It’s like a small “antiX app store” – it has a list of over a hundred of the most installed software applications, divided into categories, searchable by application name (but not description) – almost any browser you can think of, WINE, Steam, Java, VLC, language packages, are all instalable from there, using a single click- the user does not have to interact with the many times dreaded terminal.
    As “Package Installer” windows states grayed out applications are already installed.
    – To install new applications simply left click the application you want (a check will appear in the box) and click the “Install” button and wait for the automated install process to finish (you do get to see a black terminal window, that disappears automatically once the install process finishes).
    Pros: easy to use, makes many general use applications instalable with a single click.
    Cons: newbies may find the interface a bit spartan, without icons or screen shots.

    2- Use Synaptic package manager ( also available, among other places, in: menu – Control Centre – System tab ):

    This is a very powerful application that allows you to install and manage any software application available from the Debian repositories- there are many tens of thousands available.
    – to search for a application to install click to magnifying glass icon on the upper right side of the window – you can search by application name or description (ex: you can search by “VLC” or by “media player”).
    – A small search window pops up – enter the application (package) you want to search there and press the magnifying glass icon available on that window (that small window closes automatically)
    – Wait a few moments for Synaptic to show you the results of the search- they are presented on the right hand side of the main window. If you have to, scroll down the results of your search, until you find the application(s) you want to install.
    – Right click the file(s) you want to install and select “Mark for installation”. (Note: You can install more than one application or package at the same time.) If that file needs to some other files in order to run ( has dependencies), Synaptic will tell you exactly what else needs to be installed and offers to install those files. If that happens, you have to explicitly click the button to “mark” those extra files for installation, in order to continue the install process.
    – Once you selected everything you want to install, click the “Gears” icon (Apply) on the top of Synaptic’s window. A confirmation pop up window will inform you exactly how many files will be downloaded, their size what the space they will use on your hard drive after installation. Click the “Apply” button and wait for the installation to finish.
    The new application icon appears automatically on the menu. The install process is finished when you see the application you installed is “checked” in Synaptic’s main window.
    Pros: many thousands of applications available. Does not require using the terminal at all. Installs probably anything you may need. Safe to user, does not in any way harm your system.
    Cons: can be a bit overwhelming to new users because it does not only show applications but their dependencies, and also fonts, drivers, etc. Does not automatically show any graphical previews of the applications ( no pretty pictures or videos to see, like in mobile app stores) BUT you can select your application and try using the “get screenshot” button to… well, try to get a screenshot of that application…

    3- Use cli-aptiX :

    If you are not afraid to use the keyboard and are not deterred by a general interface that basically remains unchanged for decades, open a terminal and run cli-aptix
    It’s a gem! It’s as friendly as a keyboard only application can be: it offers to automatically update the database of system files (perform a apt update), and then allows you to install applications, either terminal or GUI, has a huge curated list of applications, and allows the user to search by application name or description!
    Pros: ease of use, excellent list of curated software, allows user to search for and install applications from the Debian Repositories
    Cons: terminal only, no mouse input

    4- Use Appimages :

    It’s a “universal” application format this means it’s meant to run in almost any Linux system [there are some “universal” formats, but the most well known are Snaps, Flatpaks and Appimages].
    Simply download the file, make it executable and run it (example: Open SpaceFm, navigate to where your Appimage is, right click it – Properties – Permitions – Make sure that the executable field is checked. You only have to do this once. Then every time you want to run the application simply right click it choose the option to run it).
    No installation needed!
    There are on-line Appimages application stores – this makes it easy to search for what you want. they have descriptions of the applications and usually a screenshot.
    Good places to find Appimage applications:
    https://appimage.github.io/ (it has almost 1000 applications at this time)
    https://www.appimagehub.com/ (it has almost 700 applications at this time)
    Some software applications “vendors”, like the LibreOffice webpage, offer Appimage versions of their applications directly.
    Pros: one application, one file. If you want to remove the application, just delete the file. Can’t harm your system. The worst it can happen is that the application needs some dependency that’s not available and refuses to run.
    Cons: you have to manually make the Appimage file executable once you download it – this can be boring but it’s a security feature and only has to be done once for each Appimage file! Some Appimages do not offer to automatically get added to the menu. Some Appimages to no warn of upgrades. Can be hard to make files automatically run with a Appimage application (easily solvable file association problems)
    Appimages can be huge (because they pack almost everything they need to run) and a bit slower starting, particularly on low powered machines (because they have to be unpacked. If that’s a problem for you, you can extract any appimage and simply run the application directly).

    5- Use Flatpaks :

    It’s another universal application format.
    First you need to install the flatpak application itself, then you can install applications packaged in flatpak format. You download a tiny flatpak file for the application you want and then you have to install it – flatpak connects to the server and downloads the needed files.
    There are some on-line flatpak “application stores” too.
    Where to find flatpak applications:
    https://flathub.org/home
    Pros: on the user side, you only need to install a single file. Can’t harm your system, the worst that can happen is that the application can’t run.
    Cons: at first run flatpak needs to install many hundreds of Mb of dependencies, and only then you can install applications in flatpak format.
    there are some integration problems with flatpak applications (example: they sometimes don’t match with system decorations, etc).
    It can be a bit tricky knowing how to run apps that are not added to the menu.

    6- Manually install files:

    6.1- “.run” applications or compressed binaries (like “.tar.bz”):

    Some software is available as compressed binaries like “.tar.bz” – just uncompress it and run the executable file.
    You can get the most recent Mozilla FireFox version in this format.
    Pros: safe to use, can’t, as far as I know, break your system (but can perform, as any software, malicious actions).
    Easy and safe to uninstall- simple delete the uncompressed files!
    Cons: you have to manually setup menu entries and file associations.

    “.run” applications – almost the same as above, but automatically install everything the application need to run once you execute this kind of “installer”.
    Some device drivers come in this format.
    Cons: as far as I know this can break your system. Try to install only files you know are safe (this is a univerally good advice).

    6.2- .deb files :

    “.deb” files are the packages that Debian, and Debian based distros use to install software. They work almost like “.msi” files available for MS Windows.
    Synaptic and package installer simply automate the process of installing .deb files for you.
    Manually installing these files can harm your system and make it unable to run. Do not try to use Ubuntu PPA’s! Do not try to use software that needs systemd – those probably won’t work with antiX and can harm your System.
    Do you need a particular software unavailable in Package Installer or Synatic?- Ask in the forum, so the Development team tries to add it to antiX and wait for a reply.
    That said, you can install thousands of .deb files in antiX! Simply download the file you want and open it in a file manager- a application called gdebi will try to install that file, or you can install it using the terminal.
    Software from the Debian.org is as safe to install as it can be (as long as it does not depend on systemd). Open your web browser to https://packages.debian.org/stable/ and select the application you want – they are organized into categories.
    Note: If a application is in debian.org, probably it’s better to install the very same application from Synaptic- it takes care of everything for you and avoids any complication.
    debian.org is not a web site filled with eye candy, but it has many, many application screen shots available. click the name of the application you want. On the upper right corner you’ll probably see a clickable thumbnail of the application, if one is available.
    Pros: Sometimes there are .deb applications that run fine in antiX but are not officially available.
    Cons: you have to find the file you want and install it yourself. You may have to hunt down and manually install all the dependencies your application needs to run. This can often lead to what is know as “dependency hell”- you keep installing dependencies, that need other dependencies to run, that need other dependencies to run…
    Can break your system!!!

    7- Use Windows applications :

    Windows software does not run in Linux but, you can try using a compatibility layer to try to run it – it’s called WINE. There are thousands of windows applications that run in Linux, some even faster than they run in Windows itself!
    – Install Wine (for example, using Package Installer) and then click your windows executable file to try to run it via WINE.
    A more compatible, but slower option to legally run windows applications, is downloading a free MS Windows virtual machine and using it to run that particular option in antiX. This takes a lot of storage space and is slow. Low powered computers probably can’t even run a MS Windows virtual machine due to CPU and RAM constraints.

    8- Play Windows Steam Games :

    Last time I checked there were over 5000 games available in STEAM that run in Linux.
    – Install Steam (for example, using Package Installer) and activate Proton in your Steam client and just install any compatible game!
    Cons: well, if your computer is so low powered that you choose to install antiX to make it usable, there aren’t many Steam games that can run confortably in your system. If you have a new(ish) computer, you’r probably ok.

    9 – Compile applications from the source code :

    If you don’t even know what this means, don’t even try it.

    10 – Run old DOS applications:

    They run out of the box in antiX- DosBox has that covered- if you don’t know to use it, search on-line for help… It’s pretty intuitive.
    PROS: very nearly 100% compatibility rate.

    11- Run On-line applications :

    General rule of thumb- if a web application runs, it runs well in Linux (probably it’s even housed in a server that runs Linux too).
    You can use any Google service, Youtube, LYBR, Microsoft Office 365 on-line, Netflix, etc. It’s one of the of the benefits of having Web standards (you may need to run the web application in a particular browser, like for example- the browser needs to support DRM to enable some video streaming, like Netflix and HBO)…
    CONS: I believe that at the present time video acceleration still does not work in Linux browsers out of the box. If you have a low powered CPU, video decoding or 3d video can slow to a crawl, because your system isn’t using any GPU processing power).

    12- Run applications using emulators :

    On antiX you can play, for example PlayStation 2 disks using a emulator, or arcade games using MAME. There’s also a free Windows 95 emulator for Linux (with dubious legal status).

    Applications that DO NOT RUN in antiX:

    – Generally speaking Windows applications, and applications made for other OS’s (like MacOS, android, etc). A different subject is applications that have cross platform versions (i.e. have different versions, available for Windows and Linux – like LibreOffice, Firefox, Thunderbird and VLC )
    – applications packaged in a package format other than “.deb” or any universal application file format (there are more that appimage and flatpak)
    – Snaps are unable to be installed in antiX because they depend on systemd, that is not present in antiX (you may run MX-Linux and choose to use systemd at the boot process for these applications).

    To finish up:

    There are many on-line sites that you can use to search for Linux applications. My personal favourite is:
    https://www.pling.com/
    It has many appimages available, it offers a appimage of the store web application, very handy to use.
    Also App Outlet has a appimage “Store” available, that shows appimage and flatpak applications, that you can then download to your computer and use.

    [Note: the original post disappeared- this is it’s updated version]

    #33223
    Member
    Avatarpiko1

    the only thing i really would love is a nice guide on how to install old school win 98/xp games on antix thats the only thing really cause i have tons of old games that i love to play
    and without them im better off runing win xp on my thinkpad X32

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by piko1.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by piko1.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by piko1.
    #33242
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    the only thing i really would love is a nice guide on how to install old school win 98/xp games on antix

    Ok:
    1- install WINE ( Menu- Control Centre – system tab – Package installer – Misc- Wine )
    2- configure WINE
    3- Open a file browser (SpaceFM, for example) navigate to where you have your Win 98/xp games. Right click the .exe file you want to run, select the option to open it with WINE.

    That’s about it. If the windows game runs under wine, it should start.

    If you want to, install q4wine and playonlinux from synaptic – they help configuring WINE.

    The other option you have is installing VirtualBox from the Package installer, and find a Windows 98/Xp virtual machine – Microsoft used to suply those images for free, now they only offer Windows 10 virtual images… Install that virtual image and run your games from there…

    P.

    #34795
    Member
    spacemanspaceman

    If anyone would like help installing the latest proprietary nVidia drivers from their website and/or Wine Staging to cope with slightly more up-to-date games I am happy to provide any help I can.

    ~ ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero ~ AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core ~ Corsair Dominator Platinum 32 GB RAM ~ M.2 SSD Samsung NVMe Evo 970 Plus 500GB ~ SSD Samsung Evo 860 500GB ~ NVIDIA Geforce GTX 1650 Super ~

    Between social reforms and revolution there exists for the social democracy an indissoluble tie. The struggle for reforms is its means; the social revolution, its aim.

    #36540
    Member
    Avatarqwee

    how can install onboard ?

    #36545
    Member
    XecureXecure

    how can install onboard ?

    You could do it through synaptic or through terminal
    sudo apt install --install-recommends onboard

    #36873
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    Just to help users that want to know how to install any application, not using Package Manager or Synaptic, but using the terminal:

    13- Searching for, and installing, Applications using the terminal (AKA comand line or CLI):

    13.0- Before trying to install anything, ALWAYS update the list of the available packages, if you have not done so recently:

    sudo apt update

    13.1- Search the application you want to install:

    apt-cache search [name_of_application]

    If you have to, scroll until you see the package you want to install and copy it.

    Example: apt-cache search vlc

    13.2- Install the application:

    sudo apt install [name_of_package]

    Example: sudo apt install vlc

    or, to be on the safe side, also install all the recommended packages:

    sudo apt install --install-recommends [name_of_package]

    Example: sudo apt install –install-recommends vlc

    P.

    #38421
    Member
    macondomacondo

    To remove package:

    $sudo dpkg -P [package}
    $ sudo apt-get autoremove
    $sudo apt-get clean

    antiX Core 64 Bit Runit XFS JWM

    "Sometimes a man finds his destiny on the road he took to avoid it."

    #38428
    Member
    AvatarAR

    @macondo, not to remove, but to purge package.

    #38435
    Member
    macondomacondo

    He,he I stand corrected!

    antiX Core 64 Bit Runit XFS JWM

    "Sometimes a man finds his destiny on the road he took to avoid it."

    #38813
    Member
    enriqueenrique

    Thanks, this is the most usefull entry in the forum.

    #38981
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    Thanks, enrique – I think a good percentage of the questions here in the forum could be avoided if most people read this and the https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/short-essential-how-to-list-for-the-complete-linux-newbie/ threads!

    @macondo – thanks for the “how to remove/purge installed applications using the terminal”- If I ever redo this how to, I’ll “copy” all the info in your post”!

    P.

    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by PPC.
    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by PPC.
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