How-to install applications

Forum Forums General Software How-to install applications

  • This topic has 41 replies, 19 voices, and was last updated Nov 29-7:39 pm by Brian Masinick.
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  • #88043
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    Empty Handed
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    Thanks for your reply.
    Im running AntiX from stable repos.

    Im used to run testing on my Desktop and i just want to install an package thats only there.

    Is it a better idea to run Antix testing for example?

    #88044
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    manyroads
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    Follow normal Debian installation processes if you do not want to use antiX tools like Control Centre.

    See: https://www.antixforum.com/forums/forum/antix-development/documentation/

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by manyroads.

    Pax vobiscum,
    Mark Rabideau - http://many-roads.com
    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken
    dwm & i3wm ~Reg. Linux User #449130
    20 Jan 2021 ~ "End of an Error"

    #88047
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    Thanks again.
    I enabled testing (tried with sid too) repo and i tried to install the package but it depends from systemd sadly.

    #88050
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    caprea
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    Which package?
    Did you also enable the testing repo in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/antix.list ?

    #88053
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    https://tracker.debian.org/pkg/riseup-vpn
    I used the Control Center and enable the both repos (sid+testing one at a time) , i apt update and then tried to install the package. In both cases it depends on systemd.

    #88057
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    Brian Masinick
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    https://tracker.debian.org/pkg/riseup-vpn
    I used the Control Center and enable the both repos (sid+testing one at a time) , i apt update and then tried to install the package. In both cases it depends on systemd.

    I wouldn’t do it then; if you really want to go with systemd you’re better off using Debian Sid. I run a separate distribution called siduction and experiment with Sid there. I run antiX as is using antiX 21 runit.

    The choice is yours; we’ve already made several recommendations.

    Brian Masinick

    #88283
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    I added the sid repos . And then upgraded. Then again tried to install the Riseup-VPN package . And now it worked.
    I was wondering if there would be an Antix sid iso (i386) with graphical install.

    edit: It would also awesome if we see any kind of collaboration between Antix devs and Riseup devs!

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by Empty Handed.
    #88307
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    Brian Masinick
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    I added the sid repos . And then upgraded. Then again tried to install the Riseup-VPN package . And now it worked.
    I was wondering if there would be an Antix sid iso (i386) with graphical install.

    edit: It would also awesome if we see any kind of collaboration between Antix devs and Riseup devs!

    That’s unlikely; antiX is created by a single person with community assistance with certain things; if you want collaboration you can volunteer to provide it and anything that results can be included in the repo’s.

    As an example of community assistance several people help with language translation and localization, others help with the forum, some people write scripts and tools or package a program they would like to see in the repos.

    Brian Masinick

    #93920
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    junxian428
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    Similar to Debian

    #93926
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    PPC
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    Similar to Debian

    Not “similar” but exacly the same! antiX is a Debian based Linux distribuition – basicly the main Dev, anticapitalista, fine tunes the kernels, strips a lot of heavy parts (like systemd), replaces the Desktop Environment with several very well configured Window Managers (that have so many helper scripts that act almost as a D.E.) and costumizes it to be as light and as fast as possible- almost anything that is meant for Debian, as far as it is not systemd dependent (that includes snaps) or exclusive to Debian’s default D.E., should work perfectly on antiX – Pure .deb packages (please notice: not “Ubuntu” exclusive .deb’s, but if they are meant for “ubuntu/Debian” they are probably ok) should install without problem on antiX (as long as they are meant for the same Debian version in wich your antiX version is based- example: antiX 22 is based in Debian 11, etc)

    P.

    #94431
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    PPC
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    How to install and manage Flatpaks in antiX – updated in 29/11/2022

    You may read my Post, about the pro’s and con’s of using Universal packages (including Flatpak) over at https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/why-should-you-use-universal-packages/#post-94388

    You should always install applications from Package Installer, or from the repository (using Synaptic or the terminal, via “apt install”) but if you want or need to use flatpaks, here is an up to date guide…

    -To add flatpak support to antiX 21/22, by installing the flatpak debian package and add the default repository (tested in a 32bits system and a 64bits system):

    antiX Menu > Terminal

    sudo apt update && sudo apt install flatpak lxpolkit && flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

    -Installing flatpak apps:
    There are several ways to install apps using flapak. You can download a .flatpak file and install it or You can install an app directly from Flathub -in your browser, visit https://flathub.org/home and select the app you want to install, and click the button to copy the required command to the clipboard. You can also search for and install apps using only the terminal.

    A- If you are installing from flathub.org:
    open a terminal, paste the command there and press enter. Press enter to confirm that you want to install the app, and, if asked to, press enter again, to confirm you want to install the flatpak and all it’s dependencies.

    B- If you are installing from a .flatpak file
    :
    open a terminal and run:
    flatpak install [path_to_the_.flatpak_file]
    and press enter…

    C- If you want to search for (and install) apps from the Terminal:
    flatpak search [anything_you_want_to_install]

    Copy the application ID and then run:
    flatpak install [Application_ID]

    N.B.- After installing the application(s):
    If you want to add the application(s) to antiX’s menu, after the install process (enter your password, if asked to):

    sudo ln -f -s /var/lib/flatpak/exports/share/applications/*.desktop /usr/share/applications && sudo desktop-menu --write-out-global

    -Listing all applications installed via flatpak in your computer, type, in the terminal:
    flatpak list

    -Running an application installed via flatpak- either, if you added it to the menu, launch it from there or, type, in the terminal:
    flatpak run [Application_ID_as_listed_by_flatpak_list]

    -Updating an application installed via flatpak, type, in the terminal:
    flatpak update [Application_ID_as_listed_by_flatpak_list]

    -Removing an application installed via flatpak, type, in the terminal:
    flatpak uninstall [Application_ID_as_listed_by_flatpak_list]

    If you ever uninstall any flatpak application that you added to antiX’s menu using the command above, you’ll have to manually delete broken .desktop simlinks from /usr/share/applications with this command, on the terminal:

    cd /usr/share/applications && sudo find . -xtype l -exec rm {} \; && sudo desktop-menu --write-out-global

    -Adding permissions so an application installed via flatpak has full access to your system:
    sudo flatpak override [Application_ID_as_listed_by_flatpak_list] --filesystem=host

    -Adding permissions so an application installed via flatpak has full access to your home folder:
    sudo flatpak override [Application_ID_as_listed_by_flatpak_list] --filesystem=home

    Full list of available flatpak commands:
    https://docs.flatpak.org/en/latest/flatpak-command-reference.html

    As you can see, installing and deleting flatpaks in antix is not very user friendly yet. It’s not particulary hard, if you know the right command, but it does require you to use the terminal.

    Tip: You can update antix menu (automaticaly taking care of adding or removing any flatpak app) with a single command:

    
    sudo ln -f -s /var/lib/flatpak/exports/share/applications/*.desktop /usr/share/applications && cd /usr/share/applications && sudo find . -xtype l -exec rm {} \; && sudo desktop-menu --write-out-global && echo antiX menu has been updated

    Tip: you can run flatpaks directly, without using the “flatpak run” command, by editing your bashrc file, making sure it has this lines:

    if [ -d "/var/lib/flatpak/exports/bin/" ] ;
      then PATH="/var/lib/flatpak/exports/bin/:$PATH"
    fi

    Tip: you can also add this lines to your bashrc file, to make it easier to add and remove applications installed via flatpak to your menu, using “add-fp-menu” or “remove-fp-menu”

    # Run "add-fp-menu" to make sure that all apps installed via flatpak appear in your menu: 
    alias add-fp-menu="sudo ln -f -s /var/lib/flatpak/exports/share/applications/*.desktop /usr/share/applications && sudo desktop-menu --write-out-global"
    
    # Clean up, from the menu, any deleted apps installed via flatpak "remove-fp-menu":
    alias remove-fp-menu="cd /usr/share/applications && sudo find . -xtype l -exec rm {} \; && sudo desktop-menu --write-out-global"

    I suggest a single, complex command, that could be part of antiX’s default bashrc file, to allow for better flatpak support, making sure that, installed flatpak (and only currently installed flatpaks, cleaning up empty simlinks) are displayed in antiX’s menu, ready to be used, without the need to start them from the terminal:

    #Use the "fp-update-menu" "command" to automatically add or remove flatpaks from antiX's menu: 
    if [ -d "/var/lib/flatpak/exports/bin/" ] ; 
      then alias fp-update-menu="sudo ln -f -s /var/lib/flatpak/exports/share/applications/*.desktop /usr/share/applications && cd /usr/share/applications && sudo find . -xtype l -exec rm {} \; && sudo desktop-menu --write-out-global && echo antiX menu has been updated"
    fi

    Note: to edit the bashrc file, run this command, on antix’s terminal:
    geany ~/.bashrc

    PLEASE BY VERY CAREFUL EDITING THIS FILE. It’s advised to always have backup’s of important files, before editing them.

    ——————————-

    Conclusion:

    ——————————-

    After the initial install and setup of the “flatpak” command, with my suggested edit to the bashrc file, the process of installing and using flatpaks in antix is much less complex, with 3 simple steps (that do, for now, involve the terminal, but that I, in the future, can create a GUI script to make it so you don’t even have to interact with the terminal):
    1- Open your browser, navigate to https://flathub.org/home and select the app you want to install and click the link to copy the command required to install it
    2- antiX menu > Terminal > right click inside the terminal > Paste > Press enter to run the command > Press enter to accept to install the app > Press enter one last time to accept to install the packages (if asked to)
    3- Once the install process finishes, you may add the new app to your menu: in the terminal run the command (updating the menu may require you to enter your password, if asked to):
    fp-update-menu

    The app you just installed should be installed and available in the menu, now. You may close the terminal, when it displays the text “antiX menu has been updated”.

    4- Optional step: Please note that it may be necessary to change it’s permissions as shown above, to allow the app to access your file system (ex: to open or save files) or to connect to the network (in case it’s a web browser, or an app that does need connectivity). To use a GUI to perform this task, you can use Flatseal, available from here: https://flathub.org/apps/details/com.github.tchx84.Flatseal
    Once it’s installed, run it (from the menu, if you added it to the menu, or from the terminal) and select the app(s) that you want to change permissions to (or simply click “All applications” to apply the change to all flatpak applications):
    – if you want to always allow the selected app(s) to connect to the internet, on the right side you can toggle on “Network“, ;
    – if you want the app(s) to have access to files, you can also toggle on “All user files” (or the more dangerous “All system files”).
    – if you want to print from the app(s), you can toggle on the “Printing System” option
    – if the app(s) uses pulse audio for sound, you may have to toggle on “Pulse audio sound server
    Change anything you need (this are just the settings that you probably will need to use the most) and Close Flatseal once you are done.

    Enjoy your flatpak apps.

    P.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by PPC.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by PPC.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by PPC.
    #94447
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    Brian Masinick
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    Thanks @PPC!

    While I’m not personally a fan of these alternative packaging schemes, in some cases, it’s difficult to find software, unless you build it from source. I will do that; not everyone wants to or has the skills to do so. In any case, I still appreciate the many helpful tips you consistently provide, so I appreciate this latest guide. If I ever DO decide to install a Flatpak, thanks to you, I’ll have a convenient place to read and follow the directions. Thumbs up in appreciation once again!

    Brian Masinick

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