how to make a installed desktop a system desktop?

Forum Forums New users New Users and General Questions how to make a installed desktop a system desktop?

Tagged: 

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by userx-bw Jan 9-12:39 pm.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #15196
    Member
    Avatar
    userx-bw

    whenever I install a linux distro, I end up installing a completely different desktop to use with it. At the current time it is e16, as I’ve already modified some of the code for the epplets to update them and work how I want and need them to work. With all of the modifications I put to it, I’d like to keep using it as a main desktop.

    Now on all of the distros out there, they all come with there main desktop where the software is already setup to just work with whatever needs to have root rights. They work seamlessly in asking for a password, and what not, ie the software install guis, gparted, and a hand full of others, some apps that were written just for the sue of that distro and only work when in the main desktop that it is set up to use.

    I have not ever found and good step by step, or much of anything showing how to modify whatever files need to be change in order to allow a different desktop to work exactly like the “main” desktop that came with it. As Linux can run more than on desktop and or window manager, unlike Windows.

    There should be a somewhat simple method to pass over the permissions to another desktop that is being put into use, other than the default one that it logs into after installing it.

    Yet, seeing how their is not, what are the steps needed to take to make this happen, and maybe even incorporate it into a means that if the occasion should arise to have to install it again, where all of that work would be lost. What methods could be put to use in order to prevent this?

    The second part I know adding it to an iso or in git or Sourceforge for save keeping, could be one of them. nevertheless, the first part is something I’ve been wanting to learn for awhile now. Because it is my nature to change desktops and just use what is under the hood to drive it. 😀 Then at times finding I have to logout and into that “Default” desktop to do something because it just work in that one, because that is how it was set up to work. Where in my option it should be more flexible, because Linux is more flexible then say, Windows. 😉
    Thanks for your time,
    Cheers!

    #15197
    Forum Admin
    dolphin_oracle
    dolphin_oracle

    whenever I install a linux distro, I end up installing a completely different desktop to use with it. At the current time it is e16, as I’ve already modified some of the code for the epplets to update them and work how I want and need them to work. With all of the modifications I put to it, I’d like to keep using it as a main desktop.

    Now on all of the distros out there, they all come with there main desktop where the software is already setup to just work with whatever needs to have root rights. They work seamlessly in asking for a password, and what not, ie the software install guis, gparted, and a hand full of others, some apps that were written just for the sue of that distro and only work when in the main desktop that it is set up to use.

    I have not ever found and good step by step, or much of anything showing how to modify whatever files need to be change in order to allow a different desktop to work exactly like the “main” desktop that came with it. As Linux can run more than on desktop and or window manager, unlike Windows.

    There should be a somewhat simple method to pass over the permissions to another desktop that is being put into use, other than the default one that it logs into after installing it.

    Yet, seeing how their is not, what are the steps needed to take to make this happen, and maybe even incorporate it into a means that if the occasion should arise to have to install it again, where all of that work would be lost. What methods could be put to use in order to prevent this?

    The second part I know adding it to an iso or in git or Sourceforge for save keeping, could be one of them. nevertheless, the first part is something I’ve been wanting to learn for awhile now. Because it is my nature to change desktops and just use what is under the hood to drive it. 😀 Then at times finding I have to logout and into that “Default” desktop to do something because it just work in that one, because that is how it was set up to work. Where in my option it should be more flexible, because Linux is more flexible then say, Windows. 😉
    Thanks for your time,
    Cheers!

    I’m not sure I fully understand what you are asking, but let me expand on a couple of points.

    1.

    Now on all of the distros out there, they all come with there main desktop where the software is already setup to just work with whatever needs to have root rights. They work seamlessly in asking for a password, and what not, ie the software install guis, gparted, and a hand full of others, some apps that were written just for the sue of that distro and only work when in the main desktop that it is set up to use.

    this is true. developers go to a lot of effort to make sure the distros they provide to the public work with their included software, including some distro specific stuff. On MX (and antiX) we try to set up our deb dependencies so that everything needed is pulled into the distro when an app is installed. However, sometimes apps are written with a particular environment in mind (this is true of several of the MX apps for instance, like mx-tweak or mx-system-sounds, that really only make sense in a Xfce environment).

    But apps installed from our repos should always asking for root permissions if they require them, as long as you are launching from the menu. If launching from the terminal, then its up to the user to supply the “sudo”, “gksu”, or “su-to-root” as may be required.

    2.

    I have not ever found and good step by step, or much of anything showing how to modify whatever files need to be change in order to allow a different desktop to work exactly like the “main” desktop that came with it. As Linux can run more than on desktop and or window manager, unlike Windows.

    And you likely won’t, as things are different on an app by app basis. But our menu entries should be asking for escalated permissions if the app requires them, no matter what desktop they are launched from. I know I’ve personally used MATE, GNOME, Xfce, Fluxbox, IceWM, and Budgie without issue.

    #15198
    Member
    Avatar
    userx-bw

    On this one? I’ve did the compile and install onto the stick I have setup and could not figure out how to get it to see the desktop file in /usr/share/xsessions, but that is not too much to worry about. I am planing on installing this onto my laptop soon and give it a try on here, hp 840 g2. what you just tole me gives my hope, yea!! 😀
    After I give that a shot, I’ll know more. thanks.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by userx-bw.
    #15219
    Member
    Avatar
    skidoo

    how to get it to see the desktop file in /usr/share/xsessions

    The version of SLiM display manager used by antiX ignores sessiondir ( /usr/share/xsessions/ ).
    Designated available sessions are specified by editing /etc/slim.conf

    whenever I install a linux distro, I end up installing a completely different desktop to use with it. At the current time it is e16, as I’ve already modified some of the code for the epplets to update them and work how I want and need them to work. With all of the modifications I put to it, I’d like to keep using it as a main desktop.

    Based on reading the 2 topics you’ve created, it sounds like you are finding grief//headaches from trying to force a square peg into a round hole. Out of the starting gate, you’re wanting to change the desktop environment and change away from using stable repositories, venturing into unknown territory without first understanding how the component parts of the antiX operating system interoperate. As you continue your adventure, bear in mind that few/none of the users here are familiar with the care-and-feeding of e16.

    From reading your other topic, I agree with the other reply you received ~~ the symptoms you described are indicative of a “corrupt iso” or “bad install”. I would start again with a stable base install, then change ONE component at a time (and test to confirm it’s working as expected)…

    what are the steps needed to take to make this happen, and maybe even incorporate it into a means that if the occasion should arise to have to install it again, where all of that work would be lost. What methods could be put to use in order to prevent this?

    Coincidentally, a few hour before you asked, I had opened a topic to discuss .dotfilesmanagement, backup, deployment strategies…

    #15224
    Member
    Avatar
    userx-bw

    thanks for the tip on how antix is using doing xsessions. even if I was to install a “standard” install, I would still need to switch to testing and do a compete overhaul, not one thing at a time, with these little learing quirks like how to call up the desktop I want to login to have nothing to do with that.

    think about it, they are two completely different things.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by userx-bw.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by userx-bw.
    #15227
    Forum Admin
    dolphin_oracle
    dolphin_oracle

    I would still need to switch to testing and do a compete overhaul,

    if you do that, you will likely need to run apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade at least twice in a row…I just did this not too long ago and the first dist-upgrade says its complete, but a tremendous number of packages were left unconfigured, leading to all sorts of very strange problems. but running the apt-get dist-upgrade again got things where they should be.

    #15234
    Member
    Avatar
    userx-bw

    yeah, that’s what I figured, its just a matter of getting all of the kinks out.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.