How to set the ‘set gfxmode = 1024x768x16, 1024×768’ ?

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How to set the 'set gfxmode = 1024x768x16, 1024x768'? / Como configurar o 'set gfxmode=1024x768x16, 1024x768'?

How to set the 'set gfxmode = 1024x768x16, 1024x768'? Como configurar o 'set gfxmode=1024x768x16, 1024x768'?

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  • This topic has 88 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Jul 19-5:22 pm by marcelocripe.
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 87 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #37848
    Member
    XecureXecure

    I fear the only option is to back up your current installed system and reinstall antiX using the Safe Video Mode.

    If someone with experience changing from a external graphic card to internal graphic chip can find a better solution to fix this, please don’t be shy and comment here.

    #37867
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    marcelocripe,

    Welcome to antiX. I have read this thread with interest. I have had similar problems with some of my computers. As the kernel gets updated the older video chips get left behind. I have had success getting antiX to work most of the time but it has taken some determination and effort on my part. If you are handy enough with computers you can do this.

    I have one laptop that uses the S3 VIA chips for video. Unfortunately that machine is not working right now. But as I recall the “Unichrome” (openchrome?) driver worked on that machine in antiX 16 and antiX 17 and in VESA mode on SparkyLinux.

    I have an old P-III that has an nvidia GeForce MX200 and it works with the “nouveau” driver on all antiX from 15 to 19. But I did have to use some “cheat” codes and “blacklisting” to get it to work in version 17. It is now also working in version 19.

    Here is a link to one of my threads. It’s all I could find at the moment. I have more on how BitJam and others helped me figure this out but I haven’t located it yet.

    video better in v16 than in v17?

    Seaken64

    P.S. I was thrown off at first and almost missed this thread since you entered it as a Poll. Not sure if the admins can fix that.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by seaken64.
    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by seaken64.
    #37869
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    marcelocripe,

    You don’t tell us what you are trying to do. Are you trying to save some older computers from going into the trash? Are you setting up some systems for other people to use?

    Seaken64

    #37871
    Member
    XecureXecure

    This is what I understand of marcelocripe’s problems.

    1. Installed antiX 19 on his machine (machine A) with a dedicated nvidia graphic card.
    2. He needs this nvidia card for a different computer (machine B), so he wishes to also be able to use his machine A without the graphic card.
    3. When trying to load his installed antiX (on machine A) using the onboard card (and not the dedicated card), he is not able to get to a graphical interface.
    4. Machine A has an onboard VIA card, so he was hoping this would load the gui, but it is not detected on his installed system.
    5. When testing antiX 19 live on his machine A with no plugding dedicated graphic card (no nvidia), using Safe Vide mode, antiX live environment DOES load and work with the VIA card.
    6. trying to use the same bootcodes on his installed system didn’t work.

    That is why I think it is better to reinstall with the VIA graphics working and not the nvidia, then edit boot parameters and test xorg=openchrome (or test this before installing) to see if he can at least work with the system without the nvidia card.

    If I am mistaken anywhere, please correct me.

    #37928
    Member
    Avatarmarcelocripe

    Seaken64,

    Thank you for responding and for indicating the link, I will need to read it calmly and try to understand, sometimes the translations are not sufficiently understandable. I was able to read halfway, I had to stop to continue other tests on antiX and complete this text. I am starting in the Linux world, I do not have so much skill in text mode (or command line), my job opportunities have always taken me to MS Windows and only now, better late than never, am I able to dedicate myself to researching and study a Linux distribution.

    About your question:
    “You don’t tell us what you are trying to do. Are you trying to save some older computers from going into the trash? Are you setting up some systems for other people to use?”

    The main objective is to reuse donated or discarded computers / notebooks, which have not yet been thrown away, they have about 512MB up to 2 GB of RAM with DDR1 or DDR2 technology, Intel processors: Pentium IV, Celeron, Atom, or processors AMD: Athlon, Duron and etc. So far, Linux antix is ​​being the distribution that will prevent these computers from being thrown in the trash. In Brazil, there are many people who do not have a computer or access to the internet, sometimes they only have access to a computer through non-profit non-governmental organizations (NGOs). My other challenge will be to install the other programs on antiX on these computers without internet access, that is, locally, but we will leave that for another post.

    Xecure,
    Thank you for summarizing the whole situation for Seaken64.

    I can mention, for example, another situation that I experienced in practice with MS Windows, where the offborad video card had a defect and it was necessary to use the onboard video card until it was possible to make the replacement, the replacement took and used for a long time the onboard video card, it ran the video images with great difficulty.

    The computer in question was the one I started with the first installation followed by the first tests with antiX, only after I found out that another computer has a damaged onboard video card and will need to receive this offboard video card.

    On:
    “P.S. I was thrown off at first and almost missed this thread since you entered it as a Poll. Not sure if the admins can fix that.”

    I don’t know how the post ended up becoming a poll, sometimes I get lost in the translations made by the browser.

    Xecure, thank you for all your support and help in this forum.

    Thankful.

    marcelocripe

    Original text in Brazilian Portuguese, translated into English by the Google translator.

    —————–

    Seaken64,

    Agradeço por responder e por me indicar o link, precisarei ler com calma e tentar compreender, as vezes as traduções não ficam suficientemente compreensíveis. Consegui ler até a metade, precisei parar para continuar outros testes no antiX e concluir este texto. Eu estou iniciando no mundo Linux, não possuo tanta habilidade em modo texto (ou linha de comando), as minhas oportunidades de trabalho sempre me levaram para o MS Windows e só agora, antes tarde do que nunca, estou podendo me dedicar a pesquisar e estudar uma distribuição Linux.

    Sobre a sua pergunta:
    “You don’t tell us what you are trying to do. Are you trying to save some older computers from going into the trash? Are you setting up some systems for other people to use?”

    O principal objetivo é de reutilizar computadores/notebook doados ou descartados, que ainda não foram para o lixo, estes possuem cerca de 512MB até 2 GB de memória RAM com tecnologia DDR1 ou DDR2, processadores Intel: Pentium IV, Celeron, Atom, ou processadores AMD: Athlon, Duron e etc. Até o momento, o antix Linux está sendo a distribuição que conseguirá impedir que estes computadores sejam jogados no lixo. No Brasil, existem muitas pessoas que não possuem computador ou acesso a internet, por vezes só passam a ter acesso a um computador por meio de organizações não governamentais (ONG) sem fins lucrativos. O meu outro desafio será de fazer as instalações dos outros programas no antiX nestes computadores sem acesso a internet, ou seja localmente, mas vamos deixar isso para uma outra postagem.

    Xecure,
    Agradeço por resumir toda a situação para o Seaken64.

    Eu posso citar por exemplo, outra situação que vivenciei na prática com MS Windows, onde a placa de vídeo offborad apresentou defeito e foi necessário utilizar a placa de vídeo onboard até que se conseguisse fazer a substituição, a substituição demorou e usaram por um bom tempo a placa de vídeo onboard, rodava as imagens de vídeo com grande dificuldade.

    O computador em questão foi o que eu iniciei a primeira instalação seguido dos primeiros testes com o antiX, só depois que eu fui descobrir que um outro computador está com a placa de vídeo onboard danificada e precisará receber esta placa de vídeo offboard.

    Sobre:
    “P.S. I was thrown off at first and almost missed this thread since you entered it as a Poll. Not sure if the admins can fix that.”

    Eu não sei como a postagem acabou virando enquete, as vezes me perco nas traduções feitas pelo navegador.

    Xecure, agradeço por todo apoio e ajuda neste fórum.

    Grato.

    marcelocripe

    Texto original no idioma português do Brasil, traduzido para inglês pelo tradutor do Google.

    #37961
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    Seaken64,

    Thank you for responding and for indicating the link, I will need to read it calmly and try to understand, sometimes the translations are not sufficiently understandable. I was able to read halfway, I had to stop to continue other tests on antiX and complete this text. I am starting in the Linux world, I do not have so much skill in text mode (or command line), my job opportunities have always taken me to MS Windows and only now, better late than never, am I able to dedicate myself to researching and study a Linux distribution.

    The important part is in the next to last post on that thread. Quoted here:

    Well, it took awhile but I finally got this problem solved. As it turns out I did not have to change the kernel or compile an old driver to work. All I had to do was use some “cheat codes” on the boot line from the live DVD and add to a blacklist file in /etc/modprobe.d/.

    Here’s what I did to get antiX-17 installed on this old Pentium-III:

    After booting with the Live DVD I changed the F7 video selection to “default”. Then I typed in the cheat codes “xorg=nouveau” and “bp=b9” then hit enter to continue the boot.

    A bash shell came up and I entered “modprobe nouveau”, enter, then used “Ctrl-d” to continue the boot.

    Eventually the Live desktop came on screen. I checked the inxi, lsmod, and xorg. All looked good and setup for nouveau.

    Ran the installer and then robooted. After booting the X system did not start. I came to a text login. I logged in and then checked inxi and lsmod. Nouveau was loading but so was the nvidiafb and rivafb modules. I was reminded by a forum member that sometimes the nvidiafb module has to be blacklisted for nouveau to work. So I added “blacklist nvidiafb” and “blacklist rivafb” to the blacklist files in /etc/modprobe.d/. Rebooted.

    After reboot the X desktop came up. I logged in and then took another look at inxi, lsmod and xorg.log. It all looked properly setup for nouveau.

    the cheat codes “xorg=nouveau” and “bp=b9” were the key for me. Then adding to the blacklist at /etc/modprobe.d/.

    You will probably have to do something similar, but with the drivers for your video card. The modern kernel no longer supports your card. But it can be used by force feeding the correct driver. In my case blacklisting the nvidiafb and rivafb drivers and adding the nouveau driver worked for my card.

    Don’t worry about using the command line. It is the most efficient way to tell antiX what to do. And there is no GUI version of this process in antiX.

    Seaken64

    #37962
    Member
    AvatarBobC

    Seaken’s post above is what to try with your old nVidia card installed. I don’t think the onboard video will work with it.

    #37964
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    The main objective is to reuse donated or discarded computers / notebooks, which have not yet been thrown away, they have about 512MB up to 2 GB of RAM with DDR1 or DDR2 technology, Intel processors: Pentium IV, Celeron, Atom, or processors AMD: Athlon, Duron and etc. So far, Linux antix is ​​being the distribution that will prevent these computers from being thrown in the trash. In Brazil, there are many people who do not have a computer or access to the internet, sometimes they only have access to a computer through non-profit non-governmental organizations (NGOs). My other challenge will be to install the other programs on antiX on these computers without internet access, that is, locally, but we will leave that for another post.

    antiX is one of the best tools for your purposes. It works really well on old equipment. But the support for older hardware is waning as Linux in general moves on. It may take some extra work on a few systems to get the video, sound, or NIC to work. Sometimes everything just works! But if your users can use video at 1024×768 then the VESA drivers should work for most things. (Maybe not for streaming video like YouTube. But you can “save” a video file to disk in a compatible format and view it locally instead of streaming).

    For an example, I have an old Pentium-III laptop with 256MB or RAM. It is running antiX-17 and I use it for online radio and when I want to view a Youtube video I use yt-download and save it to my hard disk. Then I use mpv to view it. I can browse the web using SeaMonkey or Netsurf. One tab at a time and with NoScript activated and antiX’s ad-blocker script. It’s not a great experience on the web. But it illustrates what antiX is capable of. On a Pentium 4 or Core2Duo with 2 megs of memory you can have a fairly modern experience on the web. Palemoon or SeaMonkey are good browsers for that type of equipment. And SMTube for YouTube, or VLC. And Audacious for music (or mpd if you’re adventurous, or Cantata).

    I have a lot of posts on here and on MX Linux about old computers. And there are several others here also who make use of antiX on old equipment. You’re in the right place.

    Seaken64

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by seaken64.
    #37966
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    Seaken’s post above is what to try with your old nVidia card installed. I don’t think the onboard video will work with it.

    I did get my S3 VIA onboard video working with antiX-16 and antiX-17. I think it can probably be done in antiX-19 but I no longer have that machine to play with. I would try to get the onboard video working in a similar manner to what worked for me with the nouveau, but using the openchrome driver for the VIA chipset.

    Seaken64

    #37967
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    @Seaken64:

    +1

    Nice explanation.

    Brian Masinick

    #37968
    Member
    XecureXecure

    @seaken64, please reread my last post. Then reread marcelocripe’s post.

    Sorry to say this, but the problem on your old post has nothing to do with the problem marcelocripe is facing.
    marcelocripe DOES get the machine to work with nvdia card using nouveau driver, but after installing with nvidia card, somehow the graphic chip on the motherboard, the VIA graphic chip, is no longer listed as a graphic device. If the nvidia card is taken away for another machine that needs it, the system will NOT boot to a graphic environment, because it cannot find the other VIA graphic chip on the motherboard.

    We have discovered that, on Safe Video mode, the VIA graphic chip does work (but badly/slowly). What we were trying to do is get the installed antiX to detect it and work with it (but right now that seems impossible). The next step would be to boot the live system with xorg=openchrome, as I suggested and you suggested in your first post here. If it can run well with this driver, then the machine can work without a video card.
    if it cannot work well enough without a video card, marcelocripe will have to wait until he gets a new one (donated by someone) to salvage the machine.

    There is no need for xorg=nouveau, nouveau.modeset=1 nor anything like that because nouveau worked, and without the card those commands are not needed.

    #38373
    Member
    Avatarmarcelocripe

    Hello colleagues,

    I apologize for the delay in returning with the test suggested by Xecure, is that I was installing antiX on the other machines and managed to configure them to be similar to what basic users are used to finding.

    1 Test: I edited the text:
    Advanced options for antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, “e” key

    vga=quiet

    for

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    The video on the monitor remains visible with the command prompt, I entered the username and password,

    user @ antix: ~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    user / .local / share / xorg / Xorg.0.log ”for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1). Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, I managed to do another test suggested by you, to install antiX again using the onborad video card of the motherboard, as another HD:

    I changed the primary boot device to USB in the motherboard BIOS.

    After loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the option antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) I pressed Enter.

    Displayed error:
    [13.344255] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376397] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    You did not load the graphical mode to install antiX.

    I restarted and after loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the Safe video Mode option, displayed:
    Displayed error:
    [13.344017] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376014] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    Then I loaded the extremely slow graphics mode, partitioned the HD and continued the installation process.

    After restarting I changed the boot order to boot via HD, unfortunately the boot failed, I will need to check with other tests if the HD is defective.

    marcelocripe

    Original text in Brazilian Portuguese, translated into English by the Google translator.

    ————–

    Olá colegas,

    Peço desculpas pela demora em retornar com o teste sugerido pelo Xecure, é que eu estava instalando nas outras máquinas o antiX e consegui configurá-las para ficarem semelhantes aos que os usuários básicos estão acostumados a encontrar.

    1 Teste: Editei o texto:
    Opções avançadas para antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, tecla “e”

    vga=quiet

    para

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    O vídeo no monitor permanece visível com o prompt de comando, entrei com o usuário e a senha,

    usuario@antix:~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    usuario/.local/share/xorg/Xorg.0.log” for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1) . Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, consegui fazer outro teste sugerido por você, de instalar novamente o antiX utilizando a placa de vídeo onborad da placa mãe, como outro HD:

    Alterei o dispositivo de boot primário para USB na BIOS da placa mãe.

    Após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) pressionei Enter.

    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344255] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376397] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Não carregou o modo gráfico para fazer a instalação do antiX.

    Reiniciei e após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção Safe video Mode, exibiu:
    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344017] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376014] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Em seguida carregou o modo gráfico extremamente lento, particionei o HD e continuei o processo de instalação.

    Após reiniciar alterei a ordem de boot para inicializar via HD, infelizmente o boot falhou, precisarei verificar com outros testes se o HD possui defeito.

    marcelocripe

    Texto original no idioma português do Brasil, traduzido para inglês pelo tradutor do Google.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by marcelocripe.
    #38375
    Member
    Avatarmarcelocripe

    Hello colleagues,

    I apologize for the delay in returning with the test suggested by Xecure, is that I was installing antiX on the other machines and managed to configure them to be similar to what basic users are used to finding.

    1 Test: I edited the text:
    Advanced options for antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, “e” key

    vga=quiet

    for

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    The video on the monitor remains visible with the command prompt, I entered the username and password,

    user @ antix: ~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    user / .local / share / xorg / Xorg.0.log ”for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1). Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, I managed to do another test suggested by you, to install antiX again using the onborad video card of the motherboard, as another HD:

    I changed the primary boot device to USB in the motherboard BIOS.

    After loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the option antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) I pressed Enter.

    Displayed error:
    [13.344255] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376397] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    You did not load the graphical mode to install antiX.

    I restarted and after loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the Safe video Mode option, displayed:
    Displayed error:
    [13.344017] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376014] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    Then I loaded the extremely slow graphics mode, partitioned the HD and continued the installation process.

    After restarting I changed the boot order to boot via HD, unfortunately the boot failed, I will need to check with other tests if the HD is defective.

    marcelocripe

    Original text in Brazilian Portuguese, translated into English by the Google translator.

    ————-

    Olá colegas,

    Peço desculpas pela demora em retornar com o teste sugerido pelo Xecure, é que eu estava instalando nas outras máquinas o antiX e consegui configurá-las para ficarem semelhantes aos que os usuários básicos estão acostumados a encontrar.

    1 Teste: Editei o texto:
    Opções avançadas para antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, tecla “e”

    vga=quiet

    para

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    O vídeo no monitor permanece visível com o prompt de comando, entrei com o usuário e a senha,

    usuario@antix:~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    usuario/.local/share/xorg/Xorg.0.log” for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1) . Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, consegui fazer outro teste sugerido por você, de instalar novamente o antiX utilizando a placa de vídeo onborad da placa mãe, como outro HD:

    Alterei o dispositivo de boot primário para USB na BIOS da placa mãe.

    Após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) pressionei Enter.

    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344255] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376397] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Não carregou o modo gráfico para fazer a instalação do antiX.

    Reiniciei e após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção Safe video Mode, exibiu:
    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344017] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376014] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Em seguida carregou o modo gráfico extremamente lento, particionei o HD e continuei o processo de instalação.

    Após reiniciar alterei a ordem de boot para inicializar via HD, infelizmente o boot falhou, precisarei verificar com outros testes se o HD possui defeito.

    marcelocripe

    Texto original no idioma português do Brasil, traduzido para inglês pelo tradutor do Google.

    #38376
    Member
    Avatarmarcelocripe

    Hello colleagues,

    I apologize for the delay in returning with the test suggested by Xecure, is that I was installing antiX on the other machines and managed to configure them to be similar to what basic users are used to finding.

    1 Test: I edited the text:
    Advanced options for antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, “e” key

    vga = quiet

    for

    vga = 791 xorg = openchrome

    F10.

    The video on the monitor remains visible with the command prompt, I entered the username and password,

    user @ antix: ~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    user / .local / share / xorg / Xorg.0.log ”for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1). Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, I managed to do another test suggested by you, to install antiX again using the onborad video card of the motherboard, as another HD:

    I changed the primary boot device to USB in the motherboard BIOS.

    After loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the option antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) I pressed Enter.

    Displayed error:
    [13.344255] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376397] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    You did not load the graphical mode to install antiX.

    I restarted and after loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the Safe video Mode option, displayed:
    Displayed error:
    [13.344017] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376014] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    Then I loaded the extremely slow graphics mode, partitioned the HD and continued the installation process.

    After restarting I changed the boot order to boot via HD, unfortunately the boot failed, I will need to check with other tests if the HD is defective.

    marcelocripe

    Original text in Brazilian Portuguese, translated into English by the Google translator.

    ————–

    Olá colegas,

    Peço desculpas pela demora em retornar com o teste sugerido pelo Xecure, é que eu estava instalando nas outras máquinas o antiX e consegui configurá-las para ficarem semelhantes aos que os usuários básicos estão acostumados a encontrar.

    1 Teste: Editei o texto:
    Opções avançadas para antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, tecla “e”

    vga=quiet

    para

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    O vídeo no monitor permanece visível com o prompt de comando, entrei com o usuário e a senha,

    usuario@antix:~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    usuario/.local/share/xorg/Xorg.0.log” for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1) . Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, consegui fazer outro teste sugerido por você, de instalar novamente o antiX utilizando a placa de vídeo onborad da placa mãe, como outro HD:

    Alterei o dispositivo de boot primário para USB na BIOS da placa mãe.

    Após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) pressionei Enter.

    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344255] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376397] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Não carregou o modo gráfico para fazer a instalação do antiX.

    Reiniciei e após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção Safe video Mode, exibiu:
    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344017] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376014] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Em seguida carregou o modo gráfico extremamente lento, particionei o HD e continuei o processo de instalação.

    Após reiniciar alterei a ordem de boot para inicializar via HD, infelizmente o boot falhou, precisarei verificar com outros testes se o HD possui defeito.

    marcelocripe

    Texto original no idioma português do Brasil, traduzido para inglês pelo tradutor do Google.

    #38377
    Member
    Avatarmarcelocripe

    Hello colleagues,

    I apologize for the delay in returning with the test suggested by Xecure, is that I was installing antiX on the other machines and managed to configure them to be similar to what basic users are used to finding.

    1 Test: I edited the text:
    Advanced options for antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, “e” key

    vga=quiet

    for

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    The video on the monitor remains visible with the command prompt, I entered the username and password,

    user @ antix: ~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    user / .local / share / xorg / Xorg.0.log ”for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1). Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, I managed to do another test suggested by you, to install antiX again using the onborad video card of the motherboard, as another HD:

    I changed the primary boot device to USB in the motherboard BIOS.

    After loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the option antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) I pressed Enter.

    Displayed error:
    [13.344255] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376397] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    You did not load the graphical mode to install antiX.

    I restarted and after loading into memory antiX Linux I selected the Safe video Mode option, displayed:
    Displayed error:
    [13.344017] minutes: SRST failed (errono = -16)
    [23.376014] minutes: SRST failed (error = -16)

    Then I loaded the extremely slow graphics mode, partitioned the HD and continued the installation process.

    After restarting I changed the boot order to boot via HD, unfortunately the boot failed, I will need to check with other tests if the HD is defective.

    marcelocripe

    Original text in Brazilian Portuguese, translated into English by the Google translator.

    ————-

    Olá colegas,

    Peço desculpas pela demora em retornar com o teste sugerido pelo Xecure, é que eu estava instalando nas outras máquinas o antiX e consegui configurá-las para ficarem semelhantes aos que os usuários básicos estão acostumados a encontrar.

    1 Teste: Editei o texto:
    Opções avançadas para antiX-19.2 Hnnie Schaft, tecla “e”

    vga=quiet

    para

    vga=791 xorg=openchrome

    F10.

    O vídeo no monitor permanece visível com o prompt de comando, entrei com o usuário e a senha,

    usuario@antix:~
    $ startx {Enter}

    X.Org X Server 1.20.4
    … Linux 4.9.0-8-amd64 x86_64 Debian



    usuario/.local/share/xorg/Xorg.0.log” for additional information. (EE) (EE) Server terminate with error (1) . Closinglog file
    xinit: giving up
    xinit: unable to connect to X server: Connection refused
    xinit: server error

    Xecure, consegui fazer outro teste sugerido por você, de instalar novamente o antiX utilizando a placa de vídeo onborad da placa mãe, como outro HD:

    Alterei o dispositivo de boot primário para USB na BIOS da placa mãe.

    Após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção antX-19.2 x64-full (27 March 2020) pressionei Enter.

    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344255] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376397] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Não carregou o modo gráfico para fazer a instalação do antiX.

    Reiniciei e após o carregamento na memória o antiX Linux selecionei a opção Safe video Mode, exibiu:
    Exibiu erro:
    [13.344017] ata:SRST falied (errono=-16)
    [23.376014] ata:SRST falied (error=-16)

    Em seguida carregou o modo gráfico extremamente lento, particionei o HD e continuei o processo de instalação.

    Após reiniciar alterei a ordem de boot para inicializar via HD, infelizmente o boot falhou, precisarei verificar com outros testes se o HD possui defeito.

    marcelocripe

    Texto original no idioma português do Brasil, traduzido para inglês pelo tradutor do Google.

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