How to upgrade to 17?

Forum Forums New users New Users and General Questions How to upgrade to 17?

  • This topic has 17 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Oct 27-8:16 am by Brian Masinick.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #791
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    I have antiX-17.b1_x64-full but don’t know debian/antix too well. Are there some instructions on how to get to 17?
    I have looked around but maybe I’m looking for the wrong thing in the right places or the right thing in the wrong places or the wrong thing in the wrong places. One never knows.

    I installed from a live usb stick if that matters.

    The version above I got by cat /etc/antix-version

    #792
    Member
    AvatarPraxis

    Presumably with the standard upgrade commands:

    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

    Or for a slightly prettier upgrade process with some feedback about your progress, assuming antix has the apt command:

    sudo apt update
    sudo apt full-upgrade

    #795
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    Alright, I did try update and dist-upgrade before I asked here. I thought for sure I had done something wrong because apt-get wants to install libsystemd0. I said “no” in response to the dist-upgrade. I’m now trying to discover why libsystemd0 wants to be installed. Maybe that’s due to installing/removing other packages since the initial install of antiX.

    #796
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    FWIW, here is a list of non-systemd packages (don’t have “systemd” in the name) that depend on libsystemd0:

    389-ds-base
    389-ds-base-libs
    apt-cacher-ng
    asterisk
    beanstalkd
    brltty
    cgminer
    cinnamon-session
    cinnamon-settings-daemon
    clamav-daemon
    conntrackd
    corosync
    corosync-notifyd
    corosync-qdevice
    corosync-qnetd
    cubemap
    dlm-controld
    dnscrypt-proxy
    dnsdist
    erlang-base
    erlang-base-hipe
    fcgiwrap
    gdm3
    gnome-desktop-testing
    gnome-disk-utility
    gnome-logs
    gnome-packagekit
    gnome-screensaver
    gnome-session-bin
    gnome-shell
    gnome-system-monitor
    guestfsd
    inputattach
    iodine
    knot
    knot-resolver
    lbcd
    libczmq4
    libgdm1
    libgsystem0
    libguestfs0
    libmutter0i
    libweston-1-0
    light-locker
    lirc
    lizardfs-chunkserver
    lizardfs-master
    lizardfs-metalogger
    mariadb-client-10.1
    mariadb-server-10.1
    mariadb-server-core-10.1
    monopd
    multipath-tools
    network-manager
    nis
    nsca-ng-server
    ocserv
    onak
    openbsd-inetd
    openvpn
    packagekit
    pdns-recursor
    pdns-server
    php7.0-fpm
    postgresql-9.6
    ratbagd
    realmd
    remctl-server
    sane-utils
    sddm
    shibboleth-sp2-utils
    spice-vdagent
    sssd-ad-common
    sssd-common
    sssd-dbus
    sssd-krb5-common
    syslog-ng-core
    syslog-ng-mod-journal
    sysprof
    tgt
    tigervnc-standalone-server
    triggerhappy
    uwsgi-core
    vdr
    weston
    xbrlapi
    xorp
    yaskkserv

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

    #802
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalistaanticapitalista

    Post inxi -r so we can see what repos you are using.

    BTW – Installing libsystemd0 will not give you systemd init.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #807
    Member
    fatmacfatmac

    @superluminal
    I usually do a fresh install with the new release, but keep my old /home, it is an option when you install. 🙂

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #819
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    @BitJam that list is either incomplete or something else is different, I ran apt-cache rdepends libsystemd0 | sort and have a different list. But it probably is not relevant (as anticapitalista says).

    @anticapitalista, the repos are whatever I got from the initial install from the live usb stick. I have taken your comment as an “all clear” sign to let the upgrade install libsystemd0.

    @fatmac I might do something like that at Release 18, but I take it a step further and buy a new HDD/SSD and then the old drive is kept near-line.

    I ran apt full-upgrade and not that much got upgraded. But I really have no idea what version I am really at…. Maybe it doesn’t matter???

    /etc/antix-version has not changed. Should it have?

    The system seems to be working fine so far.

    #823
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalistaanticapitalista

    I ran apt full-upgrade and not that much got upgraded. But I really have no idea what version I am really at…. Maybe it doesn’t matter???

    /etc/antix-version has not changed. Should it have?

    The system seems to be working fine so far.

    No, it shouldn’t.

    If you do apt-get purge libsystemd0, what does the terminal show?

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #827
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    If you do apt-get purge libsystemd0, what does the terminal show?

    It wants to remove a lot of stuff and gives a list of “no longer required” packages. Can you elaborate on where we’re going with this? Do you think there’s a problem, maybe a known problem?

    #829
    Moderator
    Brian MasinickBrian Masinick

    I ran apt full-upgrade and not that much got upgraded. But I really have no idea what version I am really at…. Maybe it doesn’t matter???

    /etc/antix-version has not changed. Should it have?

    The system seems to be working fine so far.

    IF you ran apt update and apt full-upgrade, as long as you have the same repositories enabled that were enabled in antiX-17.b1_x64-full you’ll be fine; essentially you’ll have antiX 17, plus anything else you may have added.

    The version strings do not get automatically updated when you upgrade packages. That way you know which system you started with. There are ways to change the strings manually if you really want to do that, but it shouldn’t affect normal operation of your system.

    Brian Masinick

    #830
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    The version strings do not get automatically updated when you upgrade packages. That way you know which system you started with. There are ways to change the strings manually if you really want to do that, but it shouldn’t affect normal operation of your system.

    No, I’m fine with it staying that way. I do notice /etc/debian-version updated to 9.2.

    #831
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalistaanticapitalista

    I’d like you to post the output in the terminal so we can see exactly which apps will be purged.
    Maybe you installed something that needs libsystemd0.
    Default antiX did not have it, it’s a mystery.
    Unless you are using testing or sid repos (I asked you to post inxi -r to see your repos in use, but you haven’t done so)?

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by anticapitalista.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #832
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    Not sure if this is known and/or if it’s relevant. Two “404 Not Found” come from “apt update” (or “apt-get update”). I always thought these were harmless but maybe I thought wrong.

    #835
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalistaanticapitalista

    Why won’t you post your repo list? Hiding something?

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #836
    Member
    superluminalsuperluminal

    I’d like you to post the output in the terminal so we can see exactly which apps will be purged.
    Maybe you installed something that needs libsystemd0.
    Default antiX did not have it, it’s a mystery.
    Unless you are using testing or sid repos (I asked you to post inxi -r to see your repos in use, but you haven’t done so)?

    I’m going from memory and not logged in. I really am using the stock repos that came with the install, why do you think I’m wrong or ??? I’m open to any and all criticisms. I don’t wither easily as long as it ain’t personal.

    From what I’ve read here and elsewhere (reversedepends) it seems that libsystemd0 is needed by many packages and no doubt I installed one along the way. I find that packages I build for /usr/local often require pulling in a lot of stuff and that means installing lots of packages that I wouldn’t have otherwise done. Couple that with the fact that I only know the basics of dpkg,apt-*,apt and it’s clear to me that I can easily introduce problems. But as long as things keep working I don’t worry too much.

    It seems to me that the problem is solved. But maybe what you’re getting at is that there are some packages that are depending on libsystemd0 but should not be. I’ll post the list later when I can.

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