Icewm, KDE and a good custom greeter

Forum Forums General Software Icewm, KDE and a good custom greeter

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  • This topic has 8 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Jun 22-1:59 pm by seaken64.
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  • #37786
    Member
    deeambohdeeamboh

    Hi all,
    Been playing around with 19.2 until I broke it. Yup, i’ve been a bad boy.
    First I tried several DEs then nothing seemed to work. I removed them all and now I have KDE which isn’t working and icewm which worked fine until I found an upgrade on git that broke that sweet formmating script. Now I want to downgrade it back to the original format but cant figure it out. Also I would like to get a better greeter but they are mostly arch. Need help here, kinda new to linux so sorry for not posting this in the newbie section.

    #37788
    Member
    AvatarBobC

    If you have the disk space, the easy solution is to open up another partition, boot from the original flashdrive (or whatever you installed from) and install a fresh new copy of antiX onto it. You will still be able to mount the previous partition to be able to compare or copy code. If you install a package called meld it makes comparing versions of code pretty easy.

    You could try purging all the things you installed and reinstalling all the things they affected, but that will take lots of effort, and I’m not sure you will find every single thing added, changed or deleted.

    In other words, if its hosed, why fight it, just try again and make 1 less mistake 🙂

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by BobC.
    #37802
    Member
    XecureXecure

    After installing the selected Desktop Environment (using the antiX package installer), did you select it from the display manager (or “login screen”)?

    What you need to do is, log out, if still with the default antiX login screen (slim), hit F1 until your desired desktop name appears, and then log in to your system.
    If a different “login manager” is being used, you need to select the Desktop Environment you want (a dropdown menu somewhere at the top or bottom of the screen), and then log in.
    That is the way to access the DEs.

    For now, if there is something important in your system, back it up to a USB (if you can boot to KDE, do it from there; if you cannot, do it from a live system).

    BobC is right. It will be easier to install from zero, be it rewriting you current installation or in a new partition.

    If in the future you change your display manager (from slim to lightdm, gdm3, sddm, etc), any other Desktop environment will work well, but I am not sure if you will be able to load the special antiX desktop session with the default antiX desktops. If you have problems in the future, come here to the forum and we will try to help as best we can with them.

    #37814
    Member
    mrootmroot

    Another option:

    First, backup all your data.

    Then do a new install over the partitions you are currently using for antiX, either using your usb, dvd, or the cd you installed from.

    When you go thru the installation process there will be a option to “keep home” click the box for it. Then finish the installation process as you would normally. Antix will install while retaining your original /home directory and all the files you placed in it.

    I am not sure what the greeter is. Are you referring to the splash screen?

    #37840
    Member
    deeambohdeeamboh

    Thanks for the prompt replies. I think I should start again from scratch after a backup as you have suggested. Just pissed off that I will lose a chance to learn from my mess.So I think the idea about a separate partition is just grand, that way I could still work on this messed up system. Learned a lot these past few days, thanks lots and lots.

    See you on the other side

    #37843
    Member
    syboksybok

    1) Fixing things up:
    If your PC boots to login screen, you can try to open a virtual terminal (?) by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F3 (not sure it works for login screen).
    This switches you to CLI only, you can login and reinstall the desktop that worked, e.g. fluxbox via:
    sudo apt install desktop-defaults-fluxbox-antix fluxbox fluxbox-themes-antix

    Not necessary to reinstall if the above trick works.

    2) Separate partitions:
    I have at least 3 separate partitions: /, /home, /data; the only problem is if I set them in a way that turns out to be inconvenient because of exceeding space on one of them (happened to me in the case of ‘/’ several times).
    Re-install whilst preserving /home

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by sybok. Reason: Added the item 2)
    #37855
    Member
    AvatarBobC

    You described it as a “mess”.

    If I am having problems with something, I write the steps I take down into a text file, or even use a script to make it completely repeatable. That way I can repeat (or change and repeat) those steps, or show someone else the steps I took to get where I’m at.

    It becomes something that’s “broken” rather than a mess, and easier to make sense of, and fix.

    Based on what I’ve read above, I think I would try to take an educated guess as to where the goof was, and try again without that goof, and make good notes so I could analyze the situation if things still didn’t work.

    #37898
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    You described it as a “mess”.

    If I am having problems with something, I write the steps I take down into a text file, or even use a script to make it completely repeatable. That way I can repeat (or change and repeat) those steps, or show someone else the steps I took to get where I’m at.

    It becomes something that’s “broken” rather than a mess, and easier to make sense of, and fix.

    Based on what I’ve read above, I think I would try to take an educated guess as to where the goof was, and try again without that goof, and make good notes so I could analyze the situation if things still didn’t work.

    Great advice:

    1. Take notes, observe what happens when you take certain actions.
    2. Make “back up” copies of good, working copies of software. If something gets broken, then it is easy to simply restore from the back up copy.
    3. Keep a few USB (sticks, drives, etc.) handy so you always have SOMETHING that works to some extent.
    4. Read, practice and learn.
    5. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most people will answer, particularly if it’s evident that you are trying, are willing to explain your steps, and you want to learn.

    Glad to help! Best wishes!

    Brian Masinick

    #37902
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    Welcome to antiX. I can’t tell you how many times I just had to “redo” the install. These days it takes a lot less time to re-install. And if you have anything you want to keep put it on a removable drive.

    I use partitions on my hard drives to experiment and learn. I keep a main partition as my working OS. I apply what I learn on the separate partitions to the main partition and go from there. As I get more confidence I start fiddling with the main partition directly, all the while making backup copies of the files before I make a change.

    Live USB systems are also good for experimenting. Or “frugal” installs. You can experiment and then just not save anything.

    Then, to add to all these options you have the “core”, “base” and “full” options. antiX is great for learning and experimenting. And it’s a great daily driver.

    Seaken64

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