Is it possible to install dnscrypt-proxy?

Forum Forums General Tips and Tricks Is it possible to install dnscrypt-proxy?

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  • This topic has 14 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated Jul 25-1:13 pm by Bajingan.
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  • #63457
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    Bajingan

    Is it possible to install dnscrypt-proxy to replace DNS resolver?

    • This topic was modified 2 months ago by Bajingan.
    #63459
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    anticapitalista
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    No it isn’t on antiX-19, but it should install on antiX-21 (when released).

    https://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=dnscrypt-proxy&searchon=names&suite=all&section=all&sourceid=mozilla-search

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #63463
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    Bajingan
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    BTW, I’ve experimented with the latest release from Github & Debian repo but it created systemd-related files/directories in their names.

    apt search dnscrypt-proxy

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Bajingan.
    #63466
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    anticapitalista
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    Actually it should install on antiX-19 as well. I just did it on 32 bit version.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #63468
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    Bajingan
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    The problem is that I still don’t know how to configure it in non-systemd Linux. Seems the world would cater systemd-based Linux.

    I’ve successfully configured it in systemd-based Linux, like Linux Mint, via systemctl.

    Any how-to?

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Bajingan.
    #63474
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    Xecure
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    EDIT: I have recreated the guide so you can do it visually and understand what is going on.

    0. Download and install dnscrypt-proxy using the apt command
    sudo apt update && sudo apt install dnscrypt-proxy

    1. Launch a file manager with root privileges so you can edit, copy and rename files.
    sudo spacefm &

    2. Navigate to /etc/dnscrypt-proxy/ to see if there is a dnscrypt-proxy.toml inside. This file is specifically configured for the systemd service, so you need to rename or delete. You can right-click it and select rename. I renamed it to old-dnscrypt-proxy.toml

    3. Navigate (in a new tab if you like) to /usr/share/doc/dnscrypt-proxy/examples/ folder. You should be able to see a file named example-dnscrypt-proxy.toml. Copy it to the previous folder /etc/dnscrypt-proxy/ and rename it to dnscrypt-proxy.toml. This file is the example template used for the dnscrypt-proxy configuration file, so you can leave as is or add whatever changes you need for your system.

    4. Now navigate to the /etc/ folder and delete the resolv.conf “file”, which is really a link to a different file. RIght-click and create a new resolv.conf file and paste this inside it:

    nameserver 127.0.0.1
    options edns0

    Save and close the editor.

    5. Go to /etc/init.d/ folder and edit the connman init file. This file contains the instructions for connman to start. If you add a DAEMON OPTION to disable connman from taking control of the DNS generaton, you can be sure that it wont fight with dnscrypt-proxy for DNS control. You would add this line close to the top of the file:
    DAEMON_OPTS="--nodnsproxy"
    Restart the Connman service so that it launches without the DNS option

    sudo service connman stop
    sudo service connman start

    6. Now you have everything ready to directly test if dnscrypt-proxy wrks properly. Open a terminal and run dnscrypt-proxy with the configuration file created in step 3
    sudo dnscrypt-proxy -config /etc/dnscrypt-proxy/dnscrypt-proxy.toml

    Wait for it to settle and see if it works as you expect it to.

    If it worked properly, add the startup command to /etc/rc.local (use the file manager and open rc.local and paste before exit)

    dnscrypt-proxy -config /etc/dnscrypt-proxy/dnscrypt-proxy.toml &

    From this moment on, dnscrypt-proxy will start automatically on each boot.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Xecure. Reason: fixed some of the commands
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Xecure.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Xecure. Reason: Re-did the tutorial to me more user-friendly

    antiX Live system enthusiast.
    General Live Boot Parameters for antiX.

    #63483
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    Bajingan
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    How-to remove the /etc/resolv.conf symlink, btw? Sorry, I’m a noob.

    #63488
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    Xecure
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    You can remove it from the terminal
    sudo rm /etc/resolv.conf
    or from a file manager with root privileges.

    If you aren’t very used to antiX or linux in general, maybe you should use the default connman dns configuration and not play too much around. If you do play around, try to do it on a live USB with persistence, so if something goes wrong you can simply delete the persistence file and start again.

    Here a small help post by PPC to introduce you to some antiX tools and configurations:
    Short essential how-to list for the complete Linux newbie

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Xecure.

    antiX Live system enthusiast.
    General Live Boot Parameters for antiX.

    #63522
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    Bajingan
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    BTW, could systemd applications run in SysVinit system?

    #63523
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    Xecure
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    antiX is specifically made to be systemd-free, so systemd services will not work at all. You may have better experience using MX Linux selecting systemd during boot, as they have both inits available. But antiX will not work with systemd. It is even blocked from being installed.

    antiX Live system enthusiast.
    General Live Boot Parameters for antiX.

    #63524
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    Bajingan
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    So, MX Linux gets it all? systemd, SysVinit, runit, OpenRC, s6, Upstart?

    And, what does “rc” refer to? Resource?

    #63527
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    Xecure
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    MX Linux has both sysvinit and systemd, mainly to get the antiX Live system to run properly (with sysvinit) and to also be able to run snapd and other systemd dependent programs on an installed MX system. But because of this, it isn’t as light and fast as antiX.

    Everything has advantages and disadvantages.

    RC = run commands. The folders /etc/rc[1-6].d contain a list of the programs that need to be loaded in each run level.

    If you don’t know what is going on, better use something easier. There are a lot of dns setting programs, and a few of them already work with sysvinit. Id there a specific need that pushes you to use dnscrypt-proxy?

    antiX Live system enthusiast.
    General Live Boot Parameters for antiX.

    #63532
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    Bajingan
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    Don’t worry, Firefox has built-in DoH feature. I’m using it now.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Bajingan.
    #63535
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    Xecure
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    I re-did the tutorial so that it is easier to understand. If at any point you need to try it again, this shold be a bit clearer, with less terminal commands and a bit better explanation.

    antiX Live system enthusiast.
    General Live Boot Parameters for antiX.

    #63537
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    Bajingan
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    Thank you before for your time & effort.

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