Lenovo launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu pre-loaded

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  • This topic has 3 replies, 2 voices, and was last updated Sep 27-9:56 am by Brian Masinick.
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  • #42257
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    Brian Masinick

    Lenovo launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu pre-loaded
    Link to the article: https://www.linuxtoday.com/infrastructure/lenovo-launches-thinkpad-and-thinkstation-pcs-with-ubuntu-pre-loaded-200923064009.html

    Abstract: Are you in the market for new Linux hardware? Lenovo are expanding their selection, with an announcement today of more Linux-ready ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs.

    They’re pushing hard on this too, with around 30 Ubuntu-loaded devices available for purchase on the official Lenovo store which include 13 ThinkStation™ and ThinkPad™ P Series Workstations and an additional 14 ThinkPad T, X, X1 and L series laptops. Most of which come ready with the latest version of Ubuntu with the 20.04 long-term support release, however they L series is currently sticking with Ubuntu 18.04.

    Brian Masinick

    #42258
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    Brian Masinick
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    :D

    By the way, when a vendor provides general support for several distributions, as Lenovo has been doing, it generally means that either now or in the future it is likely that it will work with many other distributions too.

    I’ve never encountered an IBM or Lenovo desktop or laptop system in the past that had difficulty working with either IBM or Lenovo systems, but this is even better news because more “current generation” systems and the drivers used in those systems are explicitly getting better support. This improves the already “good” reputation this company has for working with Linux distributions.

    Right now I have an old Lenovo Thinkpad X201 that works superbly well with Linux distributions.

    Brian Masinick

    #42260
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    Koo
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    :D

    Nice to see I have always wondered why some company’s make laptops just for Linux when in fact Linux will run on any laptop or desktop. With the exception being the latest hardware.
    Just hope that they get on top with the new hardware issues soon, as nvidia have just released the RTX 3000 series of video cards, just to give them something else to think about as well.

    Who said video gaming on PC was dead. not so cheap.

    T430 i7-3632QM 16gb , antiX-19.2.1-runit_x64-base Hannie Schaft 29 March 2020 , 5.8.16-antix.1-amd64-smp

    #42289
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    Brian Masinick
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    :D

    It’s great to see more mainstream computer vendors actually including PREINSTALLED Linux software.

    That’s really what has impeded Linux software from becoming very commonplace for over two decades.

    In the early 1990s there was simply not a sufficient amount of application software available for Linux. It was fine for the enthusiast.
    I used it starting in November 1995, but I also used a commercial UNIX workstation (and server) every day at work, so I’m not the “typical” consumer user in any sense of the word.

    As a few “easy to use” systems became available in the late nineties, they were “close” but lacked a few things:

    First, we didn’t have 90% + of application software readily available straight from the Internet. While there was SOME broadband Internet available at that time, Broadband was NOT quite there; it had been “invented” US Vice President at the time, Al Gore, even crassly claimed to have “invented” the Internet, which we know to be patently UNTRUE, though he was one of the first politicians to actually recognize how useful the Internet could be.

    Though I’ve never been a super big fan of Microsoft software, I do “applaud them” for their marketing of their Windows 95 marketing plan, beginning around August 1995. They even received permission to remake and modify the old Rolling Stones song, “Start Me Up” song to popularize their Start button on the task bar. Along with their maturing office suite and their vastly improved, baked in Internet capabilities, though proprietary and commercial, they did something that Linux did NOT do at that time, they advertised, marketed, simplified, and did a lot of things to make it easier to make computers easier to use for people who were not engineers, programmers, scientists, or computer professionals.

    Mandrake, a French-based distribution that took some good things from Red Hat, created a simpler graphical software packaging scheme, a decent user interface, and access to a variety of window managers and desktop environments, was among the first systems to really work hard on their graphical user interface. SUSE, Red Hat, and others responded, but in the early days, Mandrake led the way for Linux usability.

    At the time, Debian did NOT have any easy to use distributions. 3-4 emerging distributions that changed things, a couple of which came from the North America provinces of Canada: Corel Linux and Xandros Linux – Ontario-based, Libranet – Vancouver, British Columbia area, were a few of the early ones.

    The European region of Germany provided a couple of REALLY important distributions: Kanotix, KNOPPIX, and sidux.
    Kanotix brought more usability to Debian, KNOPPIX brought fantastic tools, and also audio/video and user interface technologies. sidux took Kanotix to the “Sid” community, and added additional tools that are still available (independent of any distribution): smxi and inxi in particular.

    Kanotix, KNOPPIX, and the tools that some independent sidux tool developers created laid the groundwork for Warren Woodford to create MEPIS, and a few years later, Paul, a.k.a. anticapitalista, made antiX available as a system particularly usable for low powered, older systems. These early versions were mostly (if not exclusively) 32- bit, but now include both 32 and 64 bit systems.

    This is not a 100% complete history and may not be PERFECTLY accurate, but it’s a quick, reasonable abstract of how these systems contributed to what we have available to us today. Anyone who wants to add to (or correct any inaccuracies) is welcome to chime in. There are Wikipedia sources that get into some of this too; I did NOT consult them today; this is my own recollection of the events as I became aware of them.

    Brian Masinick

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