Lightweight Distribution List

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  • This topic has 17 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Feb 17-9:11 am by PDP-8.
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  • #49318
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    Brian Masinick
    #49323
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    skidoo
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    wut

    .

    #49331
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    BobC
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    What I found odd was that they liked Bunsen for its blazing speed, but don’t mention performance on antiX. antiX performance is definitely the better of the two. Anyway, its a good review, regardless of it’s flaws.

    #49352
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    Brian Masinick
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    Yeah, there are a few things about the article that are questionable.

    Skidoo caught one. What’s up with”buying antiX? If that’s even possible, is any revenue going directly to anticapitalista to pay for servers and other things?

    The reviews seem to be alphabetical but as I was looking through them I had difficulty even finding antiX, much less receiving a complete review, though the comments are generally positive.

    What’s important to me and to many of us here apparently didn’t cross the minds of the reviewers.

    * antiX is one of the finest Linux distributions that can:
    — run directly from CD, DVD, removable USB drive or hard drives
    — offer a variety of ways to operate – installed on the various media mentioned above, save a persistent state on a hard drive that can be quickly access from the removal boot media. Included is the frugal boot.
    *antiX is very lean, contains fast, efficient software
    *antiX is stable, using reliable software from the stable Debian release
    *antiX is very flexible and it can be used in many ways and customized for individual requirements and preference

    Lots more to say.

    Feel free to add your own thoughts and comments on antiX and why you use it.

    Brian Masinick

    #49408
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    olsztyn
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    What I found odd was that they liked Bunsen for its blazing speed, but don’t mention performance on antiX. antiX performance is definitely the better of the two. Anyway, its a good review, regardless of it’s flaws.

    I agree with BobC entirely. I read this review some week ago and also noticed this about Bunsen, which has higher memory footprint.
    I too think it was a good review, relatively speaking, but did not include any low memory benchmarks where antiX shines. It is hard to find a useful distro as capable of operating in low memory as antiX, except Astra-Linux, which has a full blown DE and still operates in lower memory footprint than antiX. Amazing how they accomplished this…

    #49414
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalista
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    … except Astra-Linux, which has a full blown DE and still operates in lower memory footprint than antiX. Amazing how they accomplished this…

    Since it is Proprietary we will never know.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #49416
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    olsztyn
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    Since it is Proprietary we will never know.

    Indeed. They must have coded DE in assembler or something. It is Flying though, as I have never seen before… Too bad it is proprietary.

    #49422
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    Brian Masinick
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    The only other really fast and memory lean distro is proprietary?

    No thanks. I will not even check out that one.

    Offhand Absolute Linux and Puppy Linux are good distributions.

    Absolute is lean reliable and fast, but it doesn’t have the USB persistence we offer as far as I know and it’s best as a static desktop system that you replace for each update. There are a few update tools but those are not as regular in making new software available. You are better off installing a new image occasionally.
    If you want that approach, it’s good and solid.

    Puppy has many similar tools to antiX. If you are used to using it I’d say it’s a good system. I find it to be a bit of a hosge podge approach but if you get used to it I guess it is something comparable. I think that our software males sense and is better organized but I admit I am biased.

    Brian Masinick

    #49431
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    fatmac
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    I originally came here from #! (Crunchbang), I tried Crunchbang++ & looked at Bunsen, they just don’t match up to the original, so here I stay. 🙂

    P.S. I still like SliTaz, because it is so small, but don’t actually use it much; same with Tiny Core.

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #49439
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    Brian Masinick
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    I originally came here from #! (Crunchbang), I tried Crunchbang++ & looked at Bunsen, they just don’t match up to the original, so here I stay. 🙂

    P.S. I still like SliTaz, because it is so small, but don’t actually use it much; same with Tiny Core.

    I’ve used all of them except Bunsen in the past, but I have predominantly wireless networks now and both Tiny Core and SlitaZ work best, at least initially with a wired connection, and I don’t have one most of the time.

    With a good Ethernet network TinyCore was quite interesting and so was S;iTaZ but for me it was long ago.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Brian Masinick.

    Brian Masinick

    #49463
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    olsztyn
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    With a good Ethernet network TinyCore was quite interesting and so was S;iTaZ but for me it was long ago.

    Perhaps it changed recently but as I remember being TinyCore party the full TinyCore included WiFi support, which I was using with no problem. My understanding is though that with departure of the main originator this distro faded into not much progress, maintenance requiring much work due to using TC modules rather than leveraging repositories.
    SliTaz – also modular architecture became stagnant after Ver. 3.0.
    TinyCore architecture is an excellent idea, just needs larger team to continue this idea, if I remember created by Schindledecker (pardon me if I misspelled, just pulling from my memory archive from 10 years ago…).

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by olsztyn.
    #49542
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    Brian Masinick
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    I think that there are 3 versions of TinyCore and the large one has WiFi. The only one I used was 10 MB.

    That tiny version was cool and you can add quite a bit.

    I think that you are right

    The right version may very well have WiFi capability.

    Brian Masinick

    #49634
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    BobC
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    I tried crunchbang at one point, but it went away. They had a good forum and relatively light system needing 200 to 300 mb. At the time I didn’t have the tools to migrate it to antiX.

    Recently, `I tried to see if I could recreate it with an antiX respin, but there is no place I could find to download the original package definitions to identify current replacement packages.

    I don’t know if an antiX based respin of BunsenLabs would be desirable, but it would be much faster than the original, much like DMX was.

    #49635
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    skidoo
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    download the original package definitions

    For many/most of the distributions listed at distrowatch.com, when you visit the page of a given distribution you can scroll down (or search in page) to “full package list” and find a clickable link for the list associated with each release. For instance, CrunchBang 11:
    https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=crunchbang&pkglist=true&version=11#pkglist

    In cases where DW lacks a detailed list, you might be able to download an actual isofile of the distro-of-interest from archive.org software archive

    #49636
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    BobC
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    Yes, I was looking and my packagecomp utility doesn’t know that CB-metapackage won’t be available in the new system and doesn’t make a list instead of what comprised it, and thinks that openbox for example will be automatically pulled in by some other top level package, but it isn’t, and neither are many other of the reccomends.

    I guess before I put too much time into it, I need to figure out if I like crunchbang enough to try to duplicate it.

    PS: maybe my logic is wrong and while on the original system, I should record all packages installed and account for what package caused each of the ones appearing as not manually installed to be installed in case that package doesen’t exist on the system being migrated to. It has worked on different antiX versions but it falls down on things not found in the reppo list. Obviously I’m not handling those missing packages well enough.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by BobC.
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