Music and Poetry of Grup Yorum antiX

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  • This topic has 10 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated Oct 14-8:03 am by olsztyn.
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  • #68680
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    olsztyn

    In a recent thread anticapitalista pointed us to an excellent video of Helin Bölek and Grup Yorum in post https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/installing-antix-linux-on-medion-laptop/page/2/#post-68436
    I was reading comments to that Youtube video and first thing I noticed a beautiful brief quote from Nâzım Hikmet poet:
    Αν δεν καώ,
    αν δεν καείς,
    αν δεν καούμε,
    πως μπορεί η νύχτα να φωτιστεί

    As this encourages me to become more familiar with poetry of Nâzım Hikmet I also cannot miss to notice that Nâzım Hikmet was born in 1902 in Salonica, Ottoman Empire! This is exactly Thessaloniki – headquarters of antiX and residence of anticapitalista…
    Amazing coincidence… Poetry and antiX hand in hand…

    #68733
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalista
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    A lot of Nâzım Hikmet’s work has been re-produced in Greece.
    Some of his poems were translated/adapted to the Greek ‘reality’ by the Greek poet Yiannis Ritsos

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yiannis_Ritsos

    (Have a look at Ritsos’s poem called Epitaphios, also about events in Thessaloniki/Salonika)

    Hikmet’s work has been put to song as well here. A couple of examples for you to enjoy:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0u7PT7heg6o

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qawWwWAs5aM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUxDBOP46Mg

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    antiX with runit - leaner and meaner.

    #68736
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick
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    While I couldn’t read or understand anything, Nazim Hikmet has a very nice high baritone voice (similar to my singing range), but this gentleman has a superior tone, nice to listen to, even in a “foreign tongue”.

    Brian Masinick

    #68747
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    olsztyn
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    Hikmet’s work has been put to song as well here. A couple of examples for you to enjoy:

    Microcosmos – beautiful… Got lyrics (I mean the poem) to learn…

    a “foreign tongue”

    Well, if you consider Tukish language as ‘foreign’ then I would agree with you in the sense that it is not from our family of Indo-European languages, such as (almost) all languages of Europe and Persian (Farsi), which I would not consider as ‘foreign’ as all these originated from the same language, before these nations came to Europe from the East. Languages such as Greek, Romanic, Germanic and Slavic languages are the same Indo-European family, just diversified over time from the original language of their ancestors in the East.
    Although Turkish language, which came with Turks from Altai region to Anatolia in 10th century, belongs to Turkic family of languages, so not one of Indo-European family, it has grammar very similar to our common Indo-European grammar and structure. Not very foreign and not that difficult I think…
    Languages in general are fascinating…

    • This reply was modified 3 days, 19 hours ago by olsztyn.
    #68752
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    Eismckwadraat19
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    I didn’t know that Nazim’s poems have been reproduced as a song.
    Great to listen to.
    Thanks anticapitalista

    - The revolution is not an apple that falls when it is ripe. You have to make it fall -
    Che Guevara

    #68757
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick
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    Hikmet’s work has been put to song as well here. A couple of examples for you to enjoy:

    Microcosmos – beautiful… Got lyrics (I mean the poem) to learn…

    a “foreign tongue”

    Well, if you consider Tukish language as ‘foreign’ then I would agree with you in the sense that it is not from our family of Indo-European languages, such as (almost) all languages of Europe and Persian (Farsi), which I would not consider as ‘foreign’ as all these originated from the same language, before these nations came to Europe from the East. Languages such as Greek, Romanic, Germanic and Slavic languages are the same Indo-European family, just diversified over time from the original language of their ancestors in the East.
    Although Turkish language, which came with Turks from Altai region to Anatolia in 10th century, belongs to Turkic family of languages, so not one of Indo-European family, it has grammar very similar to our common Indo-European grammar and structure. Not very foreign and not that difficult I think…
    Languages in general are fascinating…

    For me, someone who has never been completely off the North/Central American shore (Canada and Jamaica, both part of “America” (just not the U.S.A.) are as far as my travels have taken me. Language wise, I only had introductory courses in French and I’ve seen words like “Welcome”, “File”, “Edit”, etc. from graphical interfaces translated into a few languages and “heard” a few words here and there… that’s my extent of “learning” when it comes to anything other than the US dialect of “American English, so my linguistic expertise is far more limited than MANY people who use antiX.

    I appreciate and value many cultures, yet I know precious little about them, and that’s another reason why these discussions have been both interesting and useful for me personally.

    Brian Masinick

    #68759
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    Eismckwadraat19
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    This is a very Nice song to from Ahmet Kaya

    https://youtu.be/_oxwvmXRZhM

    - The revolution is not an apple that falls when it is ripe. You have to make it fall -
    Che Guevara

    #68762
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    olsztyn
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    This is a very Nice song to from Ahmet Kaya

    I like the song.
    However, the displayed lyrics should be in Greek, not transcript using Latin alphabet. When it is in transcript, it is harder. Is it because it is meant for Turkish audience?
    If so, then you have the Turkish translation on the second line.
    Question:
    Ahmet Kaya is a Kurd. Why is he singing in Greek, not Kurdish, anyway? The Kurdish languages belong to the Iranian branch of the Indo-European family, so this would be very interesting to hear…
    With the above comments I did not mean to be critical about performance of Ahmet Kaya, which is excellent, but rather about how that video was made. So do not take my comments as criticism…

    • This reply was modified 3 days, 11 hours ago by olsztyn.
    • This reply was modified 3 days, 10 hours ago by olsztyn.
    • This reply was modified 3 days, 10 hours ago by olsztyn.
    #68768
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    Brian Masinick
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    This is a very Nice song to from Ahmet Kaya

    https://youtu.be/_oxwvmXRZhM

    You are right; very nice instrumental playing and nice singing!

    Brian Masinick

    #68817
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    olsztyn
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    Group Yorum sings Kürdistan’ım Hey – Hey free Kurdistan!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shPePyo0g-U
    Beautiful song! I am still looking for lyrics…
    Unfortunately just audio, not much video.
    Significant recognition of great Kurdish nation and freedom for Kurdistan by Grup Yorum…

    • This reply was modified 2 days, 2 hours ago by olsztyn.
    • This reply was modified 2 days, 2 hours ago by olsztyn.
    #68825
    Member
    olsztyn
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    I just want to highlight the video from Grup Yorum, which might as well be considered the essence of their movement – March of Socialism/communism:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjnQRo_G4-s

    My disclaimer to my Western colleagues: I am just reporting, I am the messenger. Do not blame/flame me for highlighting this video.
    I am not advertising communism by showing this video. I just want to highlight a great deal of overall romanticism of the movement.

    • This reply was modified 2 days, 1 hour ago by olsztyn.
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