OpenOffice instead of LibreOffice for antiX 32 bit machines?

Forum Forums General Software OpenOffice instead of LibreOffice for antiX 32 bit machines?

  • This topic has 51 replies, 12 voices, and was last updated May 14-3:58 pm by Brian Masinick.
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  • #92097
    Member
    andyprough

      I’m thinking about switching to OpenOffice on my 32-bit machines. I’ve been testing it out recently and it seems to run with less memory than Libreoffice, and does all the basic functions pretty well. It doesn’t have as much MS Office compatibility as LibreOffice, but on my 32-bit machines I won’t be doing any professional work.

      Just wanted to see if anyone else had a thought about it. I used to use OpenOffice daily, prior to LibreOffice, but I haven’t looked at it in quite a few years until recently. I was pleased to see it’s not dead, and in fact seems pretty stable and zippy on low-spec machines. The fact that they are still making and directly supporting 32-bit versions is a bit of a factor too.

      I’ll certainly still be using LibreOffice on my 64-bit machines, but that’s all I wanted to say, I’m looking at moving my 32-bit machines to OpenOffice. I might include it on my 32-bit antiX-Libre respins also, if I can squeeze it in under the 700mb CD-R limit.

      #92112
      Moderator
      Brian Masinick

        I have not used OpenOffice recently but if it’s still available your idea makes sense.

        If you don’t need all of the office suite, abiword is an acceptable word processor and if you are not against using cloud based software either the Google suite of Docs, Sheets, etc. is an option or searching for other free cloud based software tools is another option. I have no aversion to using Google; that’s a workable solution for me and it saves physical space at the cost of increased network activity and some degree of sacrifice in terms of relying on other services to secure your information; if that’s not an issue for you there are several other options available.

        --
        Brian Masinick

        #92117
        Member
        andyprough

          Hi Brian, I’m pretty strongly opposed to using Google services from a privacy perspective, and every time I’ve tried Abiword and Gnumeric over the years they haven’t been the right fit for me. I know that Google and Abiword and Gnumberic all have their fans, but I am not one of them. On the other hand, I’m not bashing anything, I know that everyone has their favorite tools, especially for writing, and that is perfectly fine. I know someone who has been a GNU/Linux user and Linux evangelizer for many years, but when he writes his Sci-Fi novels he can’t stand to use anything but MS Word because of the way the little tools and keyboard shortcuts work best for him.

          I did an entire college degree using OpenOffice, so I’m already very comfortable with it. Probably people who got into Linux distros like me in the late 90’s and early 2000’s will have a lot of muscle memory related to OpenOffice, and people who started using distros after about 2011 would look at it as a pretty weird set of programs with arcane dialog boxes and visual components.

          #92120
          Member
          blur13

            I’m always on the lookout for faster and more efficient programs so let us know how the switch works out for you.

            Google docs requires a modern browser so there is no way thats going to be faster on an old computer.

            I’ve actually been using SC lately for basic spreadsheet tasks, its entirely based in the terminal.

            http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/10699

            And you dont need much more than a basic text editor and pandoc to make presentations.

            #92121
            Moderator
            Brian Masinick

              I started with Linux BEFORE OpenOffice; do you remember Star Office? I tried to use it whenever possible, then OpenOffice until LibreOffice arrived but I am not against Google services; in fact I am using my Google Pixel 4A 5G to access the forum because I picked up my nephew from school; now I am at his house for a while while he does his homework.

              As you say, to each his own.
              I’m not a big Windows or Mac fan and I was on a UNIX and Linux forum recently. I must have touched a nerve with something I said, though I can’t recall being antagonistic, yet 2-3 people ganged up on me so I’m not going to participate in that place again in spite of a long past history with commercial UNIX systems.

              Anyway best wishes; hopefully OpenOffice will continue to provide exactly what you need; best wishes!????✅

              --
              Brian Masinick

              #92134
              Member
              andyprough

                I’ve actually been using SC lately for basic spreadsheet tasks, its entirely based in the terminal.

                http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/10699

                And you dont need much more than a basic text editor and pandoc to make presentations.

                Interesting, I see that sc is already installed, I’ll have to try it out some. Yes, I need more than a basic text editor myself due to my job and some graduate classes. Although I’ve heard that if I was to get skilled at LaTeX I could possibly do everything without a big graphical office suite.

                I started with Linux BEFORE OpenOffice; do you remember Star Office? I tried to use it whenever possible, then OpenOffice until LibreOffice arrived

                Same here, I used StarOffice on SuSE Professional in the late 90’s and very early 00’s, and then moved to OpenOffice. I remember IBM was also pushing some Lotus-version of StarOffice, but it was extremely buggy for me. I used to use the “GO-oo” fork of OpenOffice – do you remember that Brian? If I recall correctly, “GO-oo” is what eventually became LibreOffice.

                #92137
                Moderator
                Brian Masinick

                  Interesting; I also tried the buggy. short-lived IBM rebrand. They tried to reuse their purchased Lotus Notes brand. Thankfully they gave up and embraced OpenOffice. Not positive but IBM may have connections with OpenOffice after the Lotus escapade. They’ve definitely been a long time supporter of Linux and they bought interest in Red Hat, which continues as a prominent commercial Linux solution.

                  Like the Google situation many people won’t like IBM either. I didn’t like them in the past but I have gained respect for the many things they have learned from their mistakes.

                  They’ve invested significant resources into multiple free software projects and in major Linux spaces, such as the annual Debian conferences and others like it, IBM has donated time, people and resources to them and I have met good people from both IBM and Hewlett Packard who are Linux enthusiasts just like we are. They work for commercial companies and do a lot to help their companies see the value of free software.

                  I know that won’t change people’s views of large corporations; all I can say is that in those companies are plenty of ordinary people who are not corporate bigots and I have had the privilege of meeting and working with several of them.

                  --
                  Brian Masinick

                  #92138
                  Member
                  andyprough

                    Interesting; I also tried the buggy. short-lived IBM rebrand. They tried to reuse their purchased Lotus Notes brand. Thankfully they gave up and embraced OpenOffice. Not positive but IBM may have connections with OpenOffice after the Lotus escapade. They’ve definitely been a long time supporter of Linux and they bought interest in Red Hat, which continues as a prominent commercial Linux solution.

                    Like the Google situation many people won’t like IBM either. I didn’t like them in the past but I have gained respect for the many things they have learned from their mistakes.

                    They’ve invested significant resources into multiple free software projects and in major Linux spaces, such as the annual Debian conferences and others like it, IBM has donated time, people and resources to them and I have met good people from both IBM and Hewlett Packard who are Linux enthusiasts just like we are. They work for commercial companies and do a lot to help their companies see the value of free software.

                    I know that won’t change people’s views of large corporations; all I can say is that in those companies are plenty of ordinary people who are not corporate bigots and I have had the privilege of meeting and working with several of them.

                    I gained a huge amount of respect for IBM with the way they never backed down in defending the linux kernel in the SCO lawsuit. Can you imagine how bad that could have gotten if the SCO defendant had been one of the many corporations that doesn’t have the backbone like IBM? I shudder to think where we’d be if the kernel had been taken away from us.

                    #92141
                    Member
                    user2022

                      I use OOo 4.13 on my 21 years old retro computer.
                      OOo can good working with P-3 and 256 RAM. LO can not do it 🙂

                      #92162
                      Moderator
                      Brian Masinick

                        Of the large companies we are familiar with, I’m pretty sure that IBM was the first of them to embrace Linux, especially on servers, even though they have numerous other options. HP and Dell were two other companies who embraced Linux fairly quickly and the industry eventually followed.

                        Many companies embrace Linux on servers. At least 25 years ago I predicted that Linux would at least have a presence in most form factors but I figured that small, mobile devices would be the most logical place to adopt Linux. That did take place, but the GNU applications didn’t get quite as much attention.

                        Instead Android and Chrome dominate in one space and the BSD UNIX kernel along with a modified Next interface dominates the Apple landscape.

                        Nevertheless it is a UNIX and Linux based system kernel that drives the majority of high volume equipment today.

                        --
                        Brian Masinick

                        #92170
                        Member
                        seaken64

                          For 32-bit system OpenOffice seems a good choice. I don’t use much Office software on my 32-bit systems anymore. But if you have a need for such an application then I support your choice of OpenOffice over LibreOffice, for 32-bit and limited resources.

                          In my business we use LibreOffice since it does not cost me to license every workstation like MS Office. But I need the MS Office compatibility to interact with other businesses. I do also have MS Office on some workstations for compatibility reasons.

                          I was not a Linux user until quite late in the game. But I do remember using OpenOffice in many distros I tried, such as Slackware. Then I switched to LibreOffice when the distros I was using switched. Maybe it was antix/MX that switched to LO by default, I don’t recall.

                          I came kicking and screaming into using MS Office compatible software. I was a WordStar user and a little PFS:Write. And my favorite spreadsheet was Quatro Pro. I did not like seeing the business community force MS compatibility. But eventually I had to acquiesce and start using Word and Excel. But then when I started with Linux it seemed that I had no real choice but OpenOffice, which had some compatibility with Word and Excel.

                          I say I had no choice only because the business community needed MS Office compatibility. There are other choices, of course. But no real choice if you need to share files with others in the general business community. Now, LibreOffice serves that purpose for me on Linux and Windows.

                          Seaken64

                          #92232
                          Member
                          andyprough

                            In my business we use LibreOffice since it does not cost me to license every workstation like MS Office. But I need the MS Office compatibility to interact with other businesses.

                            It sounds like you and I are in the same situation – I have to deal with other businesses all the time that only use MS Office, and I’m lucky that LibreOffice has such a high degree of compatibility these days.

                            #92233
                            Member
                            andyprough

                              OpenOffice cannot be installed on an antiX system that already has LibreOffice installed, or apt will remove LibreOffice. So I made a 64-bit AppImage version of the latest OpenOffice, version 4.1.13, so that I can try it on my regular antiX installations without having to remove LibreOffice. The AppImage version runs very well on antiX 21 and antiX 22 as far as I can see (and probably antiX 19) – just download it and run
                              chmod +x OpenOffice.Appimage
                              to give the AppImage the executable properties that it needs.

                              I’m hosting the OpenOffice AppImage on my internet Archive library right now: http://archive.org/details/open-office
                              Feel free to download it, chmod it per above, and give it a try with
                              ./OpenOffice.Appimage

                              I noticed that it’s using significantly less memory on my antiX systems than LibreOffice – about 30%-40% less memory for me.
                              If anyone wants me to write tips on how to integrate an AppImage with your system, leave me a note and I’ll write down some instructions.

                              ============================================

                              32-bit machines

                              To install OpenOffice on 32-bit antiX, download the 32-bit DEB tarball from here: http://www.openoffice.org/download/

                              un-tar the tarball and cd into the DEBS directory:

                              tar xvf Apache_OpenOffice_4.1.13_Linux_x86_install-deb_en-US.tar.gz
                              cd en-US/DEBS/

                              Install with apt (WARNING – apt will REMOVE any LibreOffice installation at this point):
                              sudo apt install ./openoffice*.deb

                              There’s a “desktop integration” package available that seemed to work for me, in terms of all the programs showing up in the menus correctly. I’m not sure if it is necessary, but here’s how to install it – cd into the ‘desktop-integration’ folder and install with apt:

                              cd desktop-integration/
                              sudo apt install ./openoffice4.1-debian-menus_4.1.13-9810_all.deb

                              That’s it – the OpenOffice programs should be in your menus now. Next time OpenOffice releases a new version, you can just download the DEB tarball again as above and when you get to the ‘apt install’ step, apt will upgrade your installation to the new version.

                              #92234
                              Member
                              user2022

                                > OpenOffice cannot be installed on an antiX system that already has LibreOffice installed, or apt will remove LibreOffice

                                One file break normal work OOo and Lo in one machine

                                /usr/bin/soffice

                                +++

                                If I remember correctly

                                LO must be del only after try install “OOo desktop integration”

                                and if not install “OOO desktop integration” OOo not del LO

                                On deb9 i simple make (throug alian) “OOo desktop integration” with out usr/bin/soffice
                                and use together LO and OOo w/o any problem

                                • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by user2022.
                                • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by user2022.
                                #92245
                                Moderator
                                Brian Masinick

                                  Thanks for the image! It helps me to remember some of the history.

                                  When LibreOffice was started, most of the development team from OpenOffice moved to LibreOffice and continued to do work, including 64-bit support and much better compatibility with Microsoft Office, plus LibreOffice was a major contributing member to the ODF and other “interoperability formats”.

                                  Nevertheless, OpenOffice was the earlier tool; it does have at least a degree of compatibility; it’s much lighter as a result of its earlier origins, so it work on older equipment. When I installed it, my memories were further revived. While I’ll have to read up on the history to get it 100% correct, I do recall that the Apache Foundation, one of the early protectors of the “World Wide Web”, took over maintenance of OpenOffice – I did find one reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenOffice.org – that will provide additional information, and in fact, it does reference something I vaguely remembered: Star Office was the first semi-compatible office suite to Microsoft Office and that was purchased by Sun Microsystems and morphed into OpenOffice. Sun couldn’t maintain it with available resources, and eventually Apache was given the responsibility to maintain it and keep it alive.

                                  As we know, Oracle eventually took over Sun Microsystems, and wanting to spend their energies on database systems, they donated the software to Apache in 2011.
                                  Also, it was in fact Lotus Symphony that was the other tool, and IBM was involved in that one; IBM was unable to continue the work, so they also donated the code to the Apache group. I have to find a few word processor documents to experiment with; in the meantime, OpenOffice was able to open some simple text documents; it’s capable of working with a variety of formats.

                                  --
                                  Brian Masinick

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