Options for creating bios-grub? (legacy mode installation using GPT partitions)

Forum Forums General Software Options for creating bios-grub? (legacy mode installation using GPT partitions)

This topic contains 13 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by male Aug 25-3:38 am.

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  • #26121
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    mikey777

    I have an old machine (Packard-Bell Easynote MX-37 laptop) which I want to multiboot with different linux distros, including AntiX.
    In the past I have done this as a legacy mode installation using gpt partitions and it’s worked well,
    using the method outlined in this link: https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/tutorials/legacy-mode-installation-using-gpt-partitions/msg9051/#msg9051

    The advantage over MBR partitions is that you are not limited by 4 primary partitions and there is no need to create an extended partition.

    The problem I have is that when I install AntiX in legacy mode on a gpt partition, I don’t see an option for creating a bios-grub, which is a small partition of about 16MB normally created at /dev/sda1.

    Any help with this is much appreciated. I’m new to AntiX and am really impressed already by how well it runs on a single-core (CPU @1.66GHz) Samsung netbook.

    Cheers
    Mike

    • This topic was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    #26131
    Member
    male
    male

    inxi -Fzx
    and
    parted -l

    Male is the capital of the Maldives and its wonderful people.

    #26143
    Member
    Avatar
    mikey777

    Thankyou for your reply – the output from terminal for inxi is as follows:

    mike@EasyNote-MX37:~$ <strong>inxi -Fzx</strong>
    System:    Host: EasyNote-MX37 Kernel: 4.4.0-160-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 5.4.0)
               Desktop: Xfce 4.12.3 (Gtk 2.24.28) Distro: Ubuntu 16.04 xenial
    Machine:   System: Packard Bell BV product: EasyNote_MX37 v: PC10E00401
               Mobo: PACKARD BELL BV model: T12C v: 1.0
               Bios: American Megatrends v: 207 date: 10/11/2007
    CPU:       Dual core Intel Pentium Dual T2310 (-MCP-) cache: 1024 KB
               flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 ssse3) bmips: 5864
               clock speeds: max: 1467 MHz 1: 1067 MHz 2: 1467 MHz
    Graphics:  Card: Silicon Integrated Systems [SiS] 771/671 PCIE VGA Display Adapter
               bus-ID: 01:00.0
               Display Server: X.Org 1.18.4 drivers: fbdev (unloaded: vesa)
               Resolution: 640x480@73.00hz
               GLX Renderer: llvmpipe (LLVM 6.0, 128 bits)
               GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 18.0.5 Direct Rendering: Yes
    Audio:     Card Silicon Integrated Systems [SiS] Azalia Audio Controller
               driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:0f.0
               Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.4.0-160-generic
    Network:   Card-1: Silicon Integrated Systems [SiS] 191 Gigabit Ethernet Adapter
               driver: sis190 v: 1.4 port: cc00 bus-ID: 00:04.0
               IF: enp0s4 state: down mac: <filter>
               Card-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR242x / AR542x Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express)
               driver: ath5k bus-ID: 02:00.0
               IF: wlp2s0 state: up mac: <filter>
    Drives:    HDD Total Size: 250.1GB (2.2% used)
               ID-1: /dev/sda model: Samsung_SSD_850 size: 250.1GB temp: 0C
    Partition: ID-1: / size: 23G used: 5.2G (24%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda2
    RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
    Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 58.0C mobo: N/A
               Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
    Info:      Processes: 171 Uptime: 4 min Memory: 576.6/1873.4MB
               Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 5.4.0
               Client: Shell (bash 4.3.481) inxi: 2.2.35 mike@EasyNote-MX37:~$ sudo lshw -C display

    and for parted -l is as follows:

    mike@EasyNote-MX37:~$ <strong>sudo parted -l</strong>
    [sudo] password for mike: 
    Model: ATA Samsung SSD 850 (scsi)
    Disk /dev/sda: 250GB
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
    Partition Table: gpt
    Disk Flags: 
    
    Number  Start   End     Size    File system  Name                   Flags
     1      1049kB  17.8MB  16.8MB                                      bios_grub
     2      17.8MB  25.2GB  25.2GB  ext4         Linux Lite 3.8 64-bit
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    #26146
    Avatar
    Anonymous

    … a legacy mode installation using gpt partitions and it’s worked well …

    There were some cases of people shooting themselves in the head and — they STAYED ALIVE!

    Basically, you’d like to avoid the potential problems.

    If you use EFI/UEFI, you’d like to have GPT partitioning.
    If you use CSM/Legacy, you’d like to have MBR partitioning.

    The advantage over MBR partitions is that you are not limited by 4 primary partitions and there is no need to create an extended partition.

    … makes no big difference for the private PC, except if you have a few exabyte HDD’s and the disadvantage of potential problems is obvious.

    https://www.heise.de/ct/ausgabe/2013-15-Loesungen-fuer-haeufige-UEFI-Pannen-2319431.html
    https://www.heise.de/ct/artikel/Fragen-Antworten-Linux-UEFI-4350027.html
    https://www.heise.de/ct/hotline/Parallele-Installation-im-UEFI-Modus-1361956.html

    #26147
    Member
    male
    male

    It is difficult to read the output without code tags.
    So

    $ inxi -Fzx
    System: Host: EasyNote-MX37 Kernel: 4.4.0-160-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 5.4.0)
    Desktop: Xfce 4.12.3 (Gtk 2.24.28) Distro: Ubuntu 16.04 xenial
    ...
    ID-1: /dev/sda model: Samsung_SSD_850 size: 250.1GB temp: 0C
    Partition: ID-1: / size: 23G used: 5.2G (24%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda2
    
    $ sudo parted -l
    Model: ATA Samsung SSD 850 (scsi)
    Disk /dev/sda: 250GB
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
    Partition Table: gpt
    Disk Flags:
    
    Number Start End Size File system Name Flags
    1 1049kB 17.8MB 16.8MB bios_grub
    2 17.8MB 25.2GB 25.2GB ext4 Linux Lite 3.8 64-bit
    

    Unfortunately, I have never used Ubuntu in my life. But it should behave like any Linux system.

    Your bios_boot partition is already set up correctly.
    You install antiX into another partition. When asked about the bootloader, you have two options.
    Either continue without boot loader
    or to install the bootloader in the PBR (PartitionBootRecord) of the antiX installation.

    However, it may not do this and you may have to force the procedure later via terminal.

    In all cases you will have to boot into Ubuntu and run update-grub after the reboot.
    After that you should be able to select antiX in the grub menu and start it.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by male.

    Male is the capital of the Maldives and its wonderful people.

    #26150
    Member
    male
    male

    @noClue

    if you’d read first…
    he has no uefi!

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by male.

    Male is the capital of the Maldives and its wonderful people.

    #26156
    Avatar
    Anonymous

    YUP … having GPT without UEFI is a bad idea. 😉

    #26157
    Member
    Avatar
    mikey777

    It is difficult to read the output without code tags

    My apologies – took me a while to work out how to do this as in other forums I use [code] & [/code] but notice this is more straighforward here: have corrected this in #26147 to make easier to read.

    Quoting you again from above: “When asked about the bootloader, you have two options. Either
    (1) continue without boot loader, or
    (2) install the bootloader in the PBR (PartitionBootRecord) of the antiX installation.”

    As it doesn’t give a bios-grub option during the installation process (at least I couldn’t find one) shall I just do option(1)? I’m just concerned that if I do (2) it may overwrite the bios-grub. I remember when I tried this once before the bios-grub was overwritten and became an ext4 partition when installing AntiX …

    Many thanks – I really appreciate your advice 🙂

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    #26162
    Member
    Avatar
    mikey777

    YUP … having GPT without UEFI is a bad idea.

    On modern computers, which have UEFI motherboards, this is true – UEFI is not compatible with an MBR formatted drive.

    However with Legacy-only computers (i.e. before 2011-12), they can be formatted as either MBR or GPT.
    The caveat is that if you’re doing a Legacy install with GPT on these older computers, it can only be done with either single, dual or multiboot Linux setups; not with Windows OS or Windows OS/Linux dual or multiboot setups.

    Do read the tutorial link I gave in the first post, if you want further information on this.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    #26167
    Avatar
    Anonymous

    Well … that exactly is a strange thing about your “needs” …

    Why not simply create MBR partitions and have it done in a matter of minutes?

    It should multiboot antiX with something else and you “don’t see an option for creating a bios-grub, which is a small partition of about 16MB normally created at /dev/sda1.”

    “Legacy Mainstream” JuIntel Pentium dual-core T2310 Computer (1,46 GHz) from 2008, in need of 128 partitions, each bigger than 2TB?? 😉

    Why not …

    🙂

    P.S.

    I don’t see an option for creating a bios-grub, which is a small partition of about 16MB normally created at /dev/sda1

    Here you can see the basic structure (6.3.4.2).

    Boot Live, start Gparted, make all necessary partitions first, start installer and choose ‘manual’ partitioning …

    #26168
    Member
    male
    male

    @mikey777

    No.
    You already have a correctly configured bios_grub partition ! Why do you want to have another one?

    Unfortunately I have this here only in German: https://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/GRUB_2/Grundlagen/#MBR-mit-GUID-Partitionstabelle-GPT

    It corresponds exactly to these requirements.
    Number 1 is bios_grub
    Number 2 is ubuntu

    Number 3 becomes antiX

    Whether you install the bootloader or omit it doesn’t matter. If you install it, then in number 3 (sda3)
    Important in any case is the update-grub in Ubuntu.

    Edit:
    That doesn’t really emerge from your code tag…

    Control with gparted that the flag of number 1 bios_grub
    is!

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by male.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by male.

    Male is the capital of the Maldives and its wonderful people.

    #26179
    Member
    Avatar
    mikey777

    @mikey777
    Whether you install the bootloader or omit it doesn’t matter. If you install it, then in number 3 (sda3)

    Many thanks male – this is the bit I needed to be sure of as it’s a while since I last did this.
    I really like the Legacy/GTP on old laptops compared to the MBR/extended partitions setup – very easy to setup, and the partition structure is tidy, especially as I want to create more than 4 primary partitions. Thanks again male – your time/help is much appreciated.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by mikey777.
    #26185
    Forum Admin
    rokytnji
    rokytnji

    Meh, reading all of this confusing stuff. I handled things like so

    https://forum.mxlinux.org/viewtopic.php?f=107&t=50525

    Since then. Hard drive died. I broke hard drive connection wiring swapping drives. It is a persistent usb laptop now.
    Sits in bag till I have time .

    Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
    Not all who Wander are Lost.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

    #26299
    Member
    male
    male

    @mikey777, you’re welcome

    Male is the capital of the Maldives and its wonderful people.

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