a web browser for very old laptops

Forum Forums General Tips and Tricks a web browser for very old laptops

  • This topic has 18 replies, 10 voices, and was last updated Nov 27-1:04 pm by Empty Handed.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #91909
    Member
    ninos

      pale moon on antiX

      Even Falkon and qutebroswer were too slow to use on my 2007 system.
      But I’m writing this using Pale Moon,
      which I installed from synaptic.
      As I noticed,
      antiX & the browser (with two open tabs) needs only 538 MB memory
      and 30-50% of the CPU.

      • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by ninos.
      • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by ninos.
      • This topic was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by ninos.
      #91912
      Moderator
      Brian Masinick

        @ninos: Thank you for your observation. I have good results with Pale Moon on both old and new devices; it’s one of the browsers I use, depending on what I’m doing.

        --
        Brian Masinick

        #91913
        Member
        PPC

          Yes. Palemoon is faster and saves resources, but, on the other hand, in my experience, it breaks some sites (like github, etc)…
          -For full web compatibility use: Chromium (only for 64 bits systems, I think) or Firefox / Firefox-esr
          -For full web compatibility + some extra privacy: Ungoogled Chromium / Brave (?) / LibreWolf ( all only available only for 64 bits)
          -For a lighter browser, try (like Ninos mentioned) Falkon, qutebrowser, palemoon (and I add Min Browser, Otter and Netsurf)
          -For reading blogs /news sites/ simple websites- Links (provided out of the box in antiX)

          #91919
          Member
          ninos

            how can i install min browser,
            using the terminal?

            #91920
            Member
            PPC

              -Download the .deb package for for your system- http://minbrowser.org/ (if you have a 64bit computer, just open their webpage > download > download .deb … if you have a 32bits computer, you’ll have to download an older version from their github page – “min_1.9.2_i386.deb” – note: the 32bits version is old and outdated, so do not use it for sensitive data, like homebanking, etc).
              – Install the .deb package as you would any other .deb package:

              Menu > Terminal > and type “sudo apt install ” [without quotation marks, leaving a space after the last word] and then drag and drop the .deb package from your file manager to the terminal > press enter > enter your password if asked to > wait until the installation finishes… > Min will pop up in menu > Applications > Internet (or similar, I’m using antiX in Portuguese, sorry).

              P.

              • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by PPC.
              #91924
              Member
              ninos

                sudo apt install’/home/ninos/min_1.5.1_amd64.deb’
                [sudo] password for ninos:
                E: Invalid operation install/home/ninos/min_1.5.1_amd64.deb
                ninos@antix1:~

                it didn’t work…

                Can I execute the min_1.5.1_amd64.deb
                I’ve downlowded
                in any other way????????

                #91925
                Member
                PPC

                  your command is missing the space after the last word “install”, like I warned on my previous post. In your case the correct command is:

                  sudo apt install ’/home/ninos/min_1.5.1_amd64.deb’

                  Edit: Of topic, but important: I didn’t mean to sound “pedantic”- I remember how hard it was for me to start using the terminal and then start adjusting to antiX. Current antiX versions do not include a GUI (Graphic User Interface) to install .deb packages that you have in your hard drive/ pen drive / etc (by this I mean, not obtained directly via a repository).
                  In computers, like, in “normal language”, spaces, commas and periods are very important:
                  “Let’s eat children. I’m starving!” has a very different meaning from “Let’s eat, children. I’m starving!”
                  In this particular case “sudo” approximately means “Do as Super User” (not exactly but almost); “apt” is the command that manages packages (allows you to search for, install and remove packages from your system, that’s why it has to run with “sudo”, or as Root, when you use it install/remove applications- you are making changes in your system- and that can be harmful, so “regular” users can’t do that) and “install” is the order you are giving to “apt” (it could be “search”, “purge”, etc) then you have to tell “apt” where exactly the .deb package you want to install is (you can type the entire path to the file or just drag and drop it to the terminal, to save time). as in any language, you have to use spaces: “installfile” is not the same as “install file”, right?
                  One last piece of info: the simple quotation marks are used because anything inside them can have spaces (by this I mean the path to the file and / or the file itself)- if you don’t do that, the system will think that anything after a space is a different command or flag to the previous command…

                  P.

                  • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by PPC.
                  • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by PPC.
                  #91930
                  Member
                  DaveW

                    Am I wrong? Isn’t this a 64 bit release? (min_1.5.1_amd64.deb) If so, it won’t work on 32 bit system.
                    I couldn’t find a 32 bit linux release on the min browser github page. Maybe I didn’t look hard enough, or maybe it’s no longer available.

                    Correction: The min_1.9.2_i386.deb package is there at: http://github.com/minbrowser/min/releases/tag/v1.9.2

                    In any case, this thread is about Palemoon. If it works for you, that’s a good choice. Another browser that works well for me, on 32 bit system is SeaMonkey, which can be installed via Synaptic from default repositories.

                    • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by DaveW.
                    #91932
                    Member
                    PPC

                      @DaveW : you didn’t look hard enough, mate: http://github.com/minbrowser/min/releases/download/v1.9.2/min_1.9.2_i386.deb

                      Edit: got nijaed by your edit, Dave 🙂

                      I know all this talk about other browsers is off topic in what concerns “Palemoon”, but broadly speaking it’s on topic about “browser for very old laptops”- so I see my posts as only partly off topic 🙂

                      and yes, I forgot about Seamonkey – I use it’s Mail client on my work desktop – it works with Gmail, and I can’t make Claws do that…

                      P.

                      • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by PPC.
                      • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by PPC.
                      #91944
                      Member
                      ninos

                        i’ve just corrected the title

                        #91945
                        Member
                        ninos

                          You’re 100% right PPC!
                          I’ve just installed min browser on a Zorin OS system,
                          by doing exactly what you suggested on the terminal.
                          I downloaded the deb file from the official site first.
                          I will try it on my old antiX laptop tomorrow too.

                          #91953
                          Member
                          ModdIt

                            Hi guys,
                            Easy method.
                            it is also possible to enter sudo apt install in to the terminal and
                            then drag and drop a deb or debs in to the terminal window then press enter.

                            The path and deb name or names is automagicaly correctly entered.

                            You will be asked for your password to install.

                            The method works well, in my case for example Libreoffice full then two language
                            packs installed without issues many times.

                            • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by ModdIt.
                            #91957
                            Member
                            oops

                              Yes. Palemoon is faster and saves resources, but, on the other hand, in my experience, it breaks some sites (like github, etc)…
                              -For full web compatibility use: Chromium (only for 64 bits systems, I think) or Firefox / Firefox-esr
                              -For full web compatibility + some extra privacy: Ungoogled Chromium / Brave (?) / LibreWolf ( all only available only for 64 bits)
                              -For a lighter browser, try (like Ninos mentioned) Falkon, qutebrowser, palemoon (and I add Min Browser, Otter and Netsurf)
                              -For reading blogs /news sites/ simple websites- Links (provided out of the box in antiX)

                              For full web compatibility + some extra privacy: I have just tried Thorium (look like nice too and fast, but not light, for amd64 only)
                              http://github.com/Alex313031/Thorium
                              http://github.com/Alex313031/Thorium/releases/tag/M109.0.5361.0
                              thorium-browser_109.0.5361.0_amd64.deb 147 MB 14 days ago

                              Thorium is always built with the latest x64 tip-o-tree “Trunk” build of Chromium.
                              Intended to behave like and have the featureset of Google Chrome, with differences/patches/enhancements listed below.

                              FEATURES & DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CHROMIUM AND THORIUM
                              Various compiler flags that improve performance and target AVX CPU’s (read PATCHES.md)
                              Experimental MPEG-DASH support.
                              HEVC/H.265 support on Linux and Windows.
                              JPEG XL Image File Format turned on by default.
                              Enable Live Caption (SODA) on all builds.
                              Experimental PDF annotation support (called “Ink” on ChromiumOS). # DISABLED FOR NOW BECAUSE OF CRASHES.
                              Patches from Debian including font rendering patch, VAAPI Patch, Intel HD support patch, native notifications patch, title bar patch, and… the VDPAU Patch!! (Rejoice Nvidia users)
                              VAAPI on Wayland Patch (Thanks AUR and @pierro78)
                              Audio Sandbox patch.
                              DoH (DNS over HTTPS) patches from Bromite.
                              Enable Do Not Track by default patch from Vanadium.
                              Show full URLs including trailing slashes in address bar by default.
                              Disable FLOC patch.
                              Disable annoying Google API Key Infobar warning (you can still use API Keys to enable sync) from Ungoogled Chromium.
                              Disable annoying Default Browser Infobar warning.
                              Adds DuckDuckGo, Brave Search, Ecosia, Ask.com, and Yandex.com in US and other locales, along with the normal search engines.
                              Always use the local NTP (New Tab Page) regardless of search engine.
                              Fix icons when distilling page content in Reader Mode.
                              Enable new Menu UI when right clicking the Reload button. (Adds ‘Normal Reload’, ‘Hard Reload’, and ‘Clear Cache and Hard Reload’)
                              Home button and Chrome Labs shown by Default.
                              Prefetch settings updated to respect privacy.
                              Patches for GN and chrome_sandbox when building.
                              Remove the addition of the Chrome APT sources.list during installation.
                              Widevine CDM Patch for Linux.
                              Enable Parallel Downloading by Default.
                              Inclusion of pak (Linux) and pak_mingw (Windows), a utility for packing and unpacking the *.pak files in Thorium or any other Chromium based browser.
                              Logo and Branding/Naming changed to the Thorium logo, Thorium name, and “Alex313031” being appended to “The Chromium Authors” in credits, etc.
                              .desktop file includes useful cmdline flags that enable experimental or useful features. (See PATCHES.md)
                              Includes installer patches and files to include ChromeDriver and thorium_shell (content_shell), with a .desktop file being provided for thorium_shell (named thorium-shell.desktop and shows in desktop environments as Thorium Content Shell). These are also included in the Windows releases, but it doesn’t make a shorcut, although a .png and .ico is in the install directory for you to make your own shortcut with an icon. You can also run content_shell with the command thorium-shell (custom wrapper for it, located in /usr/bin/). You can run ChromeDriver at /usr/bin/chromedriver or chromedriver.exe on Windows. Also, patches for abseil library and mini_installer when building with AVX on Windows.
                              Right clicking the launcher after install gives three additional desktop actions, one to open thorium-shell, another to open in Safe Mode which disables any flags one has set in chrome://flags until the next launch, and lastly to open in Dark Mode which appends the –force-dark-mode flag….

                              EDIT:
                              Installation/Auto-Update
                              The repo can be used on any distribution that supports .deb packaging.
                              It is located at http://dl.thorium.rocks/
                              http://thorium.rocks/

                              • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by oops.
                              #91965
                              Member
                              andyprough

                                Yes. Palemoon is faster and saves resources, but, on the other hand, in my experience, it breaks some sites (like github, etc)…

                                The palefill extension fixes github and a few other crucial sites: http://github.com/martok/palefill

                                -For full web compatibility use: Chromium (only for 64 bits systems, I think) or Firefox / Firefox-esr

                                If we are talking about an ancient 32-bit machine, some systems will be able to run Firefox, and some will bog down horribly.

                                -For a lighter browser, try (like Ninos mentioned) Falkon, qutebrowser, palemoon (and I add Min Browser, Otter and Netsurf)

                                The current version of Pale Moon works with far more sites than any of the WebKit browsers or Otter or Netsurf. It’s at least worth trying on an ancient 32-bit rig. It probably won’t help for those that are addicted to sites like Netflix, however.

                                -For reading blogs /news sites/ simple websites- Links (provided out of the box in antiX)

                                Agreed, antiX has that awesome “xlinks” graphical configuration for links2 – and don’t forget the amazing newsboat feed reader!!! I sometimes go days at a time without leaving the terminal while still keeping up with all my favorite blogs and forums.

                                #91967
                                Member
                                oops

                                  Yes. Palemoon is faster and saves resources, but, on the other hand, in my experience, it breaks some sites (like github, etc)…

                                  The palefill extension fixes github and a few other crucial sites: http://github.com/martok/palefill

                                  Thank you for the info, good to know.

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