ALMOST-SOLVED – Problem to access second partition (data)

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  • This topic has 29 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Jun 21-12:38 pm by entropyagent.
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  • #145861
    Member
    Dalron

      Hi.

      New problem.
      I see my partition but when clicking on it, a window appears :

      udevil : /dev/sda5 est connu de mount - exécution de mount avec l'utilisateur actif
      udevil : avertissement 454 : options ignorées pour le périphérique figurant dans fstab (ou bien spécifiez un point de montage)
      mount: /media/74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486: /dev/sda5 already mounted on /media/74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486.
             dmesg(1) may have more information after failed mount system call.
      Thank's in advance for your kind help
      • This topic was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Dalron.
      • This topic was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Dalron.
      #145884
      Member
      stevesr0

        Question:

        1. Was the second partition ever accessible and suddenly stopped being available OR have you just added it and it has never been accessible?

        2. Have you setup an entry for the second partition in fstab?

        #145888
        Member
        techore

          Good questions from @stevesr0.

          The error reads the device is already mounted so it cannot be mounted, again, by udevil until it is unmounted. If using a file manager, it may be configured to launch udevil to mount a device and not have a check to ensure it is not already mounted resulting in the error.

          It may just be a matter of selecting /media/[device] to manage files if that is your intent.

          Couple other items.

          1. udevil will automount on boot most removable storage if it is running as a daemon
          2. if you need further assistance, provide the application you are using to select the device–antiX ships with several file managers for example

          I do not use the default apps so with additional information, others may be able to help you.

          • This reply was modified 1 month ago by techore.
          #145893
          Member
          Robin

            – Didn’t you find the drive content in the folder /media/74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486 already?
            – What says mount in a terminal window about that very device?
            – And what says sudo dmesg | tail about it, as the error output you have posted suggests?

            Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

            #145921
            Member
            Dalron

              Question:

              1. Was the second partition ever accessible and suddenly stopped being available OR have you just added it and it has never been accessible?

              2. Have you setup an entry for the second partition in fstab?

              1. Yes. That’s why it’s weird
              2. Heeeeee…. what ? so newbie… but…

              sudo mount /dev/sda5/
              mount: /dev/sda5/: can't find in /etc/fstab.
              • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Dalron.
              #145926
              Member
              sybok

                BTW, when mounting, one usuallly provides 1) what to mount ‘/dev/sda5’ and 2) a mountpoint where.
                If one of them is missing, then utility ‘mount’ looks into the ‘/etc/fstab’.
                See manual pages of the utility ‘mount’ (e.g. run ‘man mount’ in terminal).

                #145928
                Member
                Dalron

                  This is my Fstab

                  # Pluggable devices are handled by uDev, they are not in fstab
                  UUID=b3504f5c-e1f2-43ad-9623-3898d60cb987 / ext4 noatime 1 1
                  UUID=027081d1-41af-4b52-b0e2-a93b18405fbf swap swap defaults 0 0
                  #-> /dev/sda2
                  UUID=B088-5BB8                             /media/B088-5BB8                            vfat       users,noauto,uid=1000,gid=users,dmask=002,fmask=113  0 0
                  #-> /dev/sda5
                  UUID=74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486  /media/74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486 ext4       users,noauto,exec               0 0
                  /dev/cdrom                                 /media/cdrom                                iso9660    noauto,users,exec,ro            0 0
                  /dev/cdrw                                  /media/cdrw                                 iso9660    noauto,users,exec,rw            0 0
                  /dev/dvd                                   /media/dvd                                  udf        noauto,users,exec,ro            0 0
                  /dev/dvdrw                                 /media/dvdrw                                udf        noauto,users,exec,rw            0 0
                  /dev/sr0                                   /media/sr0                                  auto       noauto,users,exec,ro            0 0
                  /swap/swap swap swap defaults 0 0
                  

                  And mi Udevil

                  ##############################################################################
                  #
                  # udevil configuration file    /etc/udevil/udevil.conf
                  #
                  # This file controls what devices, networks, and files users may mount and
                  # unmount via udevil (set suid).
                  # 
                  # IMPORTANT:  IT IS POSSIBLE TO CREATE SERIOUS SECURITY PROBLEMS IF THIS FILE
                  # IS MISCONFIGURED - EDIT WITH CARE
                  #
                  # Note:  For greater control for specific users, including root, copy this
                  # file to /etc/udevil/udevil-user-USERNAME.conf replacing USERNAME with the
                  # desired username (eg /etc/udevil/udevil-user-jim.conf).
                  #
                  # Format:
                  #   OPTION = VALUE[, VALUE, ...]
                  #
                  # DO NOT USE QUOTES except literally
                  # Lines beginning with # are ignored
                  #
                  ##############################################################################
                  # To log all uses of udevil, set log_file to a file path:
                  # log_file = /var/log/udevil.log
                  # Approximate number of days to retain log entries (0=forever, max=60):
                  log_keep_days = 10
                  # allowed_types determines what fstypes can be passed by a user to the u/mount
                  # program, what device filesystems may be un/mounted implicitly, and what
                  # network filesystems may be un/mounted.
                  # It may also include the 'file' keyword, indicating that the user is allowed
                  # to mount files (eg an ISO file).  The $KNOWN_FILESYSTEMS variable may
                  # be included to include common local filesystems as well as those listed in
                  # /etc/filesystems and /proc/filesystems.
                  # allowed_types_USERNAME, if present, is used to override allowed_types for
                  # the specific user 'USERNAME'.  For example, to allow user 'jim' to mount
                  # only vfat filesystems, add:
                  # allowed_types_jim = vfat
                  # Setting allowed_types = * does NOT allow all types, as this is a security
                  # risk, but does allow all recognized types.
                  allowed_types = $KNOWN_FILESYSTEMS, file, cifs, smbfs, nfs, curlftpfs, ftpfs, sshfs, davfs, tmpfs, ramfs
                  #allowed_types = $KNOWN_FILESYSTEMS, file
                  # allowed_users is a list of users permitted to mount and unmount with udevil.
                  # Wildcards (* or ?) may be used in the usernames.  To allow all users,
                  # specify "allowed_users=*".  UIDs may be included using the form UID=1000.
                  # For example:  allowed_users = carl, UID=1000, pre*
                  # Also note that permission to execute udevil may be limited to users belonging
                  # to the group that owns /usr/bin/udevil, such as 'plugdev' or 'storage',
                  # depending on installation.
                  # allowed_users_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override allowed_users when
                  # mounting or unmounting a specific fstype (eg nfs, ext3, file).
                  # Note that when mounting a file, fstype will always be 'file' regardless of
                  # the internal fstype of the file.
                  # For example, to allow only user 'bob' to mount nfs shares, add:
                  # allowed_users_nfs = bob
                  # The root user is NOT automatically allowed to use udevil in some cases unless
                  # listed here (except for unmounting anything or mounting fstab devices).
                  allowed_users = *
                  # allowed_groups is a list of groups permitted to mount and unmount with
                  # udevil.  The user MUST belong to at least one of these groups.  Wildcards
                  # or GIDs may NOT be used in group names, but a single * may be used to allow
                  # all groups.
                  # Also note that permission to execute udevil may be limited to users belonging
                  # to the group that owns /usr/bin/udevil, such as 'plugdev' or 'storage',
                  # depending on installation.
                  # allowed_groups_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override allowed_groups when
                  # mounting or unmounting a specific fstype (eg nfs, ext3, file).  For example,
                  # to allow only members of the 'network' group to mount smb and nfs shares,
                  # use both of these lines:
                  # allowed_groups_smbfs = network
                  # allowed_groups_nfs = network
                  # The root user is NOT automatically allowed to use udevil in some cases unless
                  # listed here (except for unmounting anything or mounting fstab devices).
                  allowed_groups = *
                  # allowed_media_dirs specifies the media directories in which user mount points
                  # may be located.  The first directory which exists and does not contain a
                  # wildcard will be used as the default media directory (normally /media or
                  # /media/$USER).
                  # The $USER variable, if included, will be replaced with the username of the
                  # user running udevil.  Wildcards may also be used in any directory EXCEPT the
                  # default.  Wildcards will not match a /, except a /** suffix for recursion.
                  # allowed_media_dirs_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override allowed_media_dirs
                  # when mounting or unmounting a specific fstype (eg ext2, nfs).  For example,
                  # to cause /media/network to be used as the default media directory for
                  # nfs and ftpfs mounts, use these two lines:
                  # allowed_media_dirs_nfs   = /media/network, /media, /media/$USER
                  # allowed_media_dirs_ftpfs = /media/network, /media, /media/$USER
                  # NOTE: If you want only the user who mounted a device to have access to it
                  # and be allowed to unmount it, specify /media/$USER as the first
                  # allowed media directory (only /media/$USER is created on demand).
                  # IMPORTANT:  If an allowed file is mounted to a media directory, the user may
                  # be permitted to unmount its associated loop device even though internal.
                  # INCLUDING /MNT HERE IS NOT RECOMMENDED.  ALL ALLOWED MEDIA DIRECTORIES
                  # SHOULD BE OWNED AND WRITABLE ONLY BY ROOT.
                  allowed_media_dirs = /media/$USER, /run/media/$USER
                  # allowed_devices is the first criteria for what block devices users may mount
                  # or unmount.  If a device is not listed in allowed_devices, it cannot be
                  # un/mounted (unless in fstab).  However, even if a device is listed, other
                  # factors may prevent its use.  For example, access to system internal devices
                  # will be denied to normal users even if they are included in allowed_devices.  
                  # allowed_devices_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override allowed_devices when
                  # mounting or unmounting a specific fstype (eg ext3, ntfs).  For example, to
                  # prevent all block devices containing an ext4 filesystem from being
                  # un/mounted use:
                  # allowed_devices_ext4 =
                  # Note: Wildcards may be used, but a wildcard will never match a /, except
                  # for "allowed_devices=*" which allows any device.  The recommended setting is
                  # allowed_devices = /dev/*
                  # WARNING:  ALLOWING USERS TO MOUNT DEVICES OUTSIDE OF /dev CAN CAUSE SERIOUS
                  # SECURITY PROBLEMS.  DO NOT ALLOW DEVICES IN /dev/shm
                  allowed_devices = /dev/*
                  # allowed_internal_devices causes udevil to treat any listed block devices as
                  # removable, thus allowing normal users to un/mount them (providing they are
                  # also listed in allowed_devices).
                  # allowed_internal_devices_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override
                  # allowed_internal_devices when mounting or unmounting a specific fstype
                  # (eg ext3, ntfs).  For example, to allow block devices containing a vfat
                  # filesystem to be un/mounted even if they are system internal devices, use:
                  # allowed_internal_devices_vfat = /dev/sdb*
                  # Some removable esata drives look like internal drives to udevil.  To avoid
                  # this problem, they can be treated as removable with this setting.
                  # WARNING:  SETTING A SYSTEM DEVICE HERE CAN CAUSE SERIOUS SECURITY PROBLEMS.
                  # allowed_internal_devices =
                  # allowed_internal_uuids and allowed_internal_uuids_FSTYPE work similarly to
                  # allowed_internal_devices, except that UUIDs are specified instead of devices.
                  # For example, to allow un/mounting of an internal filesystem based on UUID:
                  # allowed_internal_uuids = cc0c4489-8def-1e5b-a304-ab87c3cb626c0
                  # WARNING:  SETTING A SYSTEM DEVICE HERE CAN CAUSE SERIOUS SECURITY PROBLEMS.
                  # allowed_internal_uuids = 
                  # forbidden_devices is used to prevent block devices from being un/mounted
                  # even if other settings would allow them (except devices in fstab).
                  # forbidden_devices_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override
                  # forbidden_devices when mounting or unmounting a specific fstype
                  # (eg ext3, ntfs).  For example, to prevent device /dev/sdd1 from being
                  # mounted when it contains an ntfs filesystem, use:
                  # forbidden_devices_ntfs = /dev/sdd1
                  # NOTE: device node paths are canonicalized before being tested, so forbidding
                  # a link to a device will have no effect.
                  forbidden_devices =
                  # allowed_networks determines what hosts may be un/mounted by udevil users when
                  # using nfs, cifs, smbfs, curlftpfs, ftpfs, or sshfs.  Hosts may be specified
                  # using a hostname (eg myserver.com) or IP address (192.168.1.100).
                  # Wildcards may be used in hostnames and IP addresses, but CIDR notation 
                  # (192.168.1.0/16) is NOT supported.  IP v6 is supported.  For example:
                  # allowed_networks = 127.0.0.1, 192.168.1.*, 10.0.0.*, localmachine, *.okay.com
                  # Or, to prevent un/mounting of any network shares, set:
                  # allowed_networks =
                  # allowed_networks_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override allowed_networks
                  # when mounting or unmounting a specific network fstype (eg nfs, cifs, sshfs,
                  # curlftpfs).  For example, to limit nfs and samba shares to only local
                  # networks, use these two lines:
                  # allowed_networks_nfs = 192.168.1.*, 10.0.0.*
                  # allowed_networks_cifs = 192.168.1.*, 10.0.0.*
                  allowed_networks = *
                  # forbidden_networks and forbidden_networks_FSTYPE are used to specify networks
                  # that are never allowed, even if other settings allow them (except fstab).
                  # NO REVERSE LOOKUP IS PERFORMED, so including bad.com will only have an effect
                  # if the user uses that hostname.  IP lookup is always performed, so forbidding
                  # an IP address will also forbid all corresponding hostnames.
                  forbidden_networks = 
                  # allowed_files is used to determine what files in what directories may be
                  # un/mounted.  A user must also have read permission on a file to mount it.
                  # Note: Wildcards may be used, but a wildcard will never match a /, except
                  # for "allowed_files=*" which allows any file, and a /** suffix, which matches
                  # all files recursively.
                  # For example, to allow only files in the /share directory to be mounted, use:
                  # allowed_files = /share/*
                  # To allow all files in the /share directory AND all subdirectories use:
                  # allowed_files = /share/**
                  # NOTE:  Specifying allowed_files_FSTYPE will NOT work because the fstype of
                  # files is always 'file'.
                  allowed_files = *
                  # forbidden_files is used to specify files that are never allowed, even if
                  # other settings allow them (except fstab).  Specify a full path.
                  # Note: Wildcards may be used, but a wildcard will never match a /, except
                  # for "forbidden_files = *", or a /** suffix, which matches all recursively.
                  # NOTE: file paths are canonicalized before being tested, so forbidding
                  # a link to a file will have no effect.
                  forbidden_files = 
                  # default_options specifies what options are always included when performing
                  # a mount, in addition to any options the user may specify.
                  # Note:  When a device is present in /etc/fstab, and the user does not specify
                  # a mount point, the device is mounted with normal user permissions using
                  # the fstab entry, without these options.
                  # default_options_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override default_options
                  # when mounting a specific fstype (eg ext2, nfs).
                  # The variables $USER, $UID, and $GID are changed to the user's username, UID,
                  # and GID.
                  # FOR GOOD SECURITY, default_options SHOULD ALWAYS INCLUDE: nosuid,noexec,nodev
                  # WARNING:  OPTIONS PRESENT OR MISSING CAN CAUSE SERIOUS SECURITY PROBLEMS.
                  default_options           = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime
                  default_options_file      = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, ro
                  # mount iso9660 with 'ro' to prevent mount read-only warning
                  default_options_iso9660   = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, ro, utf8
                  default_options_udf       = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_vfat      = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, utf8
                  default_options_exfat     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=1000, gid=1000
                  default_options_msdos     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_umsdos    = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_ntfs      = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, utf8
                  default_options_cifs      = nosuid, noexec, nodev, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_smbfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_sshfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, nonempty, allow_other
                  default_options_curlftpfs = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, nonempty, allow_other
                  default_options_ftpfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_davfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_tmpfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  default_options_ramfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  # allowed_options determines all options that a user may specify when mounting.
                  # All the options used in default_options above must be included here too, or
                  # they will be rejected.  If the user attempts to use an option not included
                  # here, an error will result.  Wildcards may be used.
                  # allowed_options_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override allowed_options
                  # when mounting a specific fstype (eg ext2, nfs).
                  # The variables $USER, $UID, and $GID are changed to the user's username, UID,
                  # and GID.
                  # If you want to forbid remounts, remove 'remount' from here.
                  # WARNING:  OPTIONS HERE CAN CAUSE SERIOUS SECURITY PROBLEMS - CHOOSE CAREFULLY
                  allowed_options           = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, fmask=0133, dmask=0022, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, ro, rw, sync, flush, iocharset=*, utf8, remount
                  allowed_options_nfs       = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, ro, rw, sync, remount, port=*, rsize=*, wsize=*, hard, proto=*, timeo=*, retrans=*
                  allowed_options_cifs      = nosuid, noexec, nodev, ro, rw, remount, port=*, user=*, username=*, pass=*, password=*, guest, domain=*, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, credentials=*
                  allowed_options_smbfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, ro, rw, remount, port=*, user=*, username=*, pass=*, password=*, guest, domain=*, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, credentials=*
                  allowed_options_sshfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, ro, rw, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, nonempty, allow_other, idmap=user, BatchMode=yes, port=*
                  allowed_options_curlftpfs = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, ro, rw, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, nonempty, allow_other, user=*
                  allowed_options_ftpfs     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, ro, rw, port=*, user=*, pass=*, root=*, uid=$UID, gid=$GID
                  #allowed_options_exfat     = nosuid, noexec, nodev, noatime, fmask=0133, dmask=0022, uid=$UID, gid=$GID, umask=0077, namecase=*, ro, rw, sync, flush, iocharset=*, remount, nonempty
                  # mount_point_mode, if present and set to a non-empty value, will cause udevil
                  # to set the mode (permissions) on the moint point after mounting  If not
                  # specified or if left empty, the mode is not changed.  Mode must be octal
                  # starting with a zero (0755).
                  # mount_point_mode_FSTYPE, if present, is used to override mount_point_mode
                  # when mounting a specific fstype (eg ext2, nfs).
                  # NOT SETTING A MODE CAN HAVE SECURITY IMPLICATIONS FOR SOME FSTYPES
                  mount_point_mode = 0755
                  # don't set a mode for some types:
                  mount_point_mode_sshfs =
                  mount_point_mode_curlftpfs =
                  mount_point_mode_ftpfs =
                  # Use the settings below to change the default locations of programs used by
                  # udevil, or (advanced topic) to redirect commands to your scripts.
                  # When substituting scripts, make sure they are root-owned and accept the
                  # options used by udevil (for example, the mount_program must accept --fake,
                  # -o, -v, and other options valid to mount.)
                  # Be sure to specify the full path and include NO OPTIONS or other arguments.
                  # These programs may also be specified as configure options when building
                  # udevil.
                  # THESE PROGRAMS ARE RUN AS ROOT
                  # mount_program   = /bin/mount
                  # umount_program  = /bin/umount
                  # losetup_program = /sbin/losetup
                  # setfacl_program = /usr/bin/setfacl
                  # validate_exec specifies a program or script which provides additional
                  # validation of a mount or unmount command, beyond the checks performed by
                  # udevil.  The program is run as a normal user (if root runs udevil,
                  # validate_exec will NOT be run).  The program is NOT run if the user is
                  # mounting a device without root privileges (a device in fstab).
                  # The program is passed the username, a printable description of what is
                  # happening, and the entire udevil command line as the first three arguments.
                  # The program must return an exit status of 0 to allow the mount or unmount
                  # to proceed.  If it returns non-zero, the user will be denied permission.
                  # For example, validate_exec might specify a script which notifies you
                  # of the command being run, or performs additional steps to authenticate the
                  # user.
                  # Specify a full path to the program, with NO options or arguments.
                  # validate_exec =
                  # validate_rootexec works similarly to validate_exec, except that the program
                  # is run as root.  validate_rootexec will also be run if the root user runs
                  # udevil.  If both validate_exec and validate_rootexec are specified, 
                  # validate_rootexec will run first, followed by validate_exec.
                  # The program must return an exit status of 0 to allow the mount or unmount
                  # to proceed.  If it returns non-zero, the user will be denied permission.
                  # Unless you are familiar with writing root scripts, it is recommended that
                  # rootexec settings NOT be used, as it is easy to inadvertently open exploits.
                  # THIS PROGRAM IS ALWAYS RUN AS ROOT, even if the user running udevil is not.
                  # validate_rootexec =
                  # success_exec is run after a successful mount, remount, or unmount.  The 
                  # program is run as a normal user (if root runs udevil, success_exec
                  # will NOT be run).
                  # The program is passed the username, a printable description of what action
                  # was taken, and the entire udevil command line as the first three arguments.
                  # The program's exit status is ignored.
                  # For example, success_exec might run a script which informs you of what action
                  # was taken, and might perform further actions.
                  # Specify a full path to the program, with NO options or arguments.
                  # success_exec =
                  # success_rootexec works similarly to success_exec, except that the program is
                  # run as root.  success_rootexec will also be run if the root user runs udevil.
                  # If both success_exec and success_rootexec are specified,  success_rootexec
                  # will run first, followed by success_exec.
                  # Unless you are familiar with writing root scripts, it is recommended that
                  # rootexec settings NOT be used, as it is easy to inadvertently open exploits.
                  # THIS PROGRAM IS ALWAYS RUN AS ROOT, even if the user running udevil is not.
                  # success_rootexec =
                  • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Dalron.
                  #145931
                  Member
                  Robin

                    sudo mount /dev/sda5/

                    The idea was to run the mount command without any arguments, to get a listing:

                    $ mount
                    ...
                    /dev/sda5 on /media/74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,noatime)
                    ...

                    Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

                    #145938
                    Member
                    Dalron

                      Thank you Robin.
                      Here it is

                      $ mount
                      sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
                      proc on /proc type proc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
                      udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,nosuid,relatime,size=877620k,nr_inodes=206544,mode=755)
                      devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,gid=5,mode=600,ptmxmode=000)
                      tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=179528k,mode=755)
                      /dev/sda3 on / type ext4 (rw,noatime)
                      tmpfs on /run/lock type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=5120k)
                      securityfs on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw,relatime)
                      pstore on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw,relatime)
                      tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=359040k)
                      rpc_pipefs on /run/rpc_pipefs type rpc_pipefs (rw,relatime)
                      cgroup2 on /sys/fs/cgroup type cgroup2 (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,nsdelegate,memory_recursiveprot)
                      tmpfs on /run/user/1000 type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,size=179524k,nr_inodes=44881,mode=700,uid=1000,gid=1000)
                      
                      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Dalron.
                      #145940
                      Member
                      Robin

                        Fine. /dev/sda5 is not mounted currently as you can see in the listing. So udevil in your first posting is wrong obviously.

                        Next I’d suggest to check whether the UUID/PARTUUID still matches the entry in fstab. Use the blkid command for this to find out:

                        $ blkid /dev/sda5
                        /dev/sda5: LABEL="rootantiX23" UUID="74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486" BLOCK_SIZE="4096" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="ac3cdf17-02"

                        I reckon you have to use the PARTUUID rather than the UUID of the complete drive in fstab to be able to mount the partition /dev/sda5 here. (See the entry for /dev/sda2 in your fstab for reference)

                        Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

                        #145944
                        Member
                        Dalron

                          OK

                          $ blkid /dev/sda5
                          /dev/sda5: UUID="74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486" BLOCK_SIZE="4096" TYPE="ext4" PARTLABEL="DJANGO" PARTUUID="fa4cb68b-2d97-4799-8e5b-a54e19751f4f"
                          

                          Just in case I tried…

                          sudo mount /dev/sda5 /media/DJANGO
                          mount: /media/DJANGO: mount point does not exist.
                                 dmesg(1) may have more information after failed mount system call.

                          I do not have skills to understand this information… but thank’s for others ;) =>

                          I reckon you have to use the PARTUUID rather than the UUID of the complete drive in fstab to be able to mount the partition /dev/sda5 here. (See the entry for /dev/sda2 in your fstab for reference)

                          • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Dalron.
                          • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Dalron.
                          #145976
                          Member
                          Xunzi_23

                            As others are helping best they can.

                            This is like closing the door after the animals run away. The problem would not have occurred with correct use of the antiX installer.

                            Whenever possible mount points should be setup during install, why I know, I had to fix a similar problem for a user some time ago.
                            After some failed attempts I found Root reinstall keeping home was best fix. 5 Storage partitions to get mounting properly=headache…

                            #145978
                            Member
                            Dalron

                              As others are helping best they can.

                              This is like closing the door after the animals run away. The problem would not have occurred with correct use of the antiX installer.

                              Whenever possible mount points should be setup during install, why I know, I had to fix a similar problem for a user some time ago.
                              After some failed attempts I found Root reinstall keeping home was best fix. 5 Storage partitions to get mounting properly=headache…

                              It was functioning initially. I did some changes to install few programs… Then it did not work anymore. So I expect that it is easy to repair something

                              #145981
                              Member
                              Robin

                                Well, you have to match the entry in your fstab with your actual partition PARTUUID the blckid gave you back for /dev/sda5. So best guess is to change the existing entry from

                                #-> /dev/sda5
                                UUID=74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486  /media/74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486 ext4       users,noauto,exec               0 0

                                to something like that:

                                #-> /dev/sda5
                                UUID=fa4cb68b-2d97-4799-8e5b-a54e19751f4f  /media/Django ext4       users,noauto,exec,rw               0 0

                                It is up to you whether you additionally want to set uid= ,gid= ,dmask= ,fmask= and so on for this entry.

                                You can edit the fdisk file simply by the command

                                $ sudo geany /etc/fdisk

                                After you have changed CAREFULLY the values in this file without damaging anything you might be able to mount the drive.

                                5 Storage partitions to get mounting properly=headache

                                Yes, you have to look up all their PARTUUIDs and enter them manually into fstab file. Not really fun, I know.

                                I did some changes to install few programs

                                What changes and where did you do them?

                                Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

                                #146031
                                Member
                                Dalron

                                  Hi
                                  Thank you Robin.

                                  1.
                                  I did several attemps to configure my computer with swap and zram… It’s very slow… I also tried to install some applications in vain (Tuxguitar or Civilization2), and finally had a problem with the audio (it was very low, so I switched to pulseaudio rather than pipewire).

                                  2.
                                  I did the changes you recommend me.Then when restarting, clicking in the file manager I get this response :

                                  udevil : /dev/sda5 est connu de mount - exécution de mount avec l'utilisateur actif
                                  udevil : avertissement 454 : options ignorées pour le périphérique figurant dans fstab (ou bien spécifiez un point de montage)
                                  mount: /media/DJANGO: mount point does not exist.
                                         dmesg(1) may have more information after failed mount system call.

                                  If I choose Root > Mount :

                                  Entrer la commande de montage :
                                  Usage :
                                  	%v	fichier de périphérique (« /dev/sda5 »)
                                  	%o	options de montage spécifiques au volume
                                  		(« noexec,nosuid,noatime »)
                                  Note : « fstab » écrase certaines options.
                                  MODIFIER AVEC PRÉCAUTION. Cette commande est lancée avec l’utilisateur root.
                                  /usr/bin/udevil mount -o %o %v

                                  And after I confirm, it apppears in a terminal box

                                  Terminé avec erreur (code de retour : 32)
                                  /usr/bin/udevil mount -o noexec,nosuid,noatime /dev/sda5

                                  If I cllick on properties of the partition in the file manager :

                                  DEVICE
                                  /dev/sda5 internal mountable
                                  USAGE
                                  /dev/sda5      ext4  195,3 Go  ( not mounted )
                                  FSTAB
                                  #-> /dev/sda5
                                  UUID=74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486 /media/DJANGO ext4 users,noauto,exec,rw		 0 0
                                  INFO
                                  UUID=74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486
                                  Showing information for /dev/sda5
                                    native-path:                 /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:11.0/ata1/host0/target0:0:0/0:0:0:0/block/sda/sda5
                                    device:                      8:5
                                    device-file:                 /dev/sda5
                                      presentation:              /dev/sda5
                                      by-id:                     /dev/disk/by-id/ata-TOSHIBA_MK3265GSX_70QXB076B-part5
                                    system internal:             1
                                    removable:                   0
                                    has media:                   1
                                    is read only:                0
                                    is mounted:                  0
                                    mount paths:                 
                                    presentation hide:           0
                                    presentation nopolicy:       0
                                    presentation name:           
                                    presentation icon:           
                                    automount hint:              
                                    size:                        209715200000
                                    block size:                  512
                                    usage:                       filesystem
                                    type:                        ext4
                                    version:                     1.0
                                    uuid:                        74340f90-ea32-42f6-a297-ac7765f66486
                                    label:                       
                                    partition:
                                      scheme:                    
                                      number:                    5
                                      type:                      
                                      flags:                     
                                      offset:                    2983198720
                                      alignment offset:          0
                                      size:                      3556769792
                                      label:                     
                                      uuid:                      

                                  3.
                                  Now an idea… (sometimes I dream) : when askind sudo fdisk -l, I get :
                                  […]

                                  
                                  Disk /dev/sda: 298,09 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
                                  Disk model: TOSHIBA MK3265GS
                                  Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
                                  Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
                                  I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
                                  Disklabel type: gpt
                                  Disk identifier: E114B4DA-3003-4204-8891-A283D09047DA
                                  Device         Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
                                  /dev/sda1       2048      4095      2048     1M BIOS boot
                                  /dev/sda2       4096   1054719   1050624   513M EFI System
                                  /dev/sda3    1054720 211445759 210391040 100,3G Linux filesystem
                                  /dev/sda4  211445760 215541759   4096000     2G Linux filesystem
                                  /dev/sda5  215541760 625141759 409600000 195,3G Microsoft basic data

                                  So maybe this partition would rather be a NTFS rather than ext4 ??

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