Proprietary Nvidia-304 driver for antix-23.1_x64-base

Forum Forums Official Releases antiX-23 “Arditi del Popolo Proprietary Nvidia-304 driver for antix-23.1_x64-base

  • This topic has 5 replies, 2 voices, and was last updated May 15-10:19 am by Robin.
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  • #140111
    Member
    Len E.

      References:

      -“Last nvidia-legacy304xx driver, for Antix 19“,
      https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/last-nvidia-legacy304xx-driver-
      for-antix-19/

      -“Proprietary Nvidia-304 driver for antiX-21_386_base”,
      https://www.antixforum.com/forums/topic/proprietary-nvidia-304xx-driver-
      for-antix-21_386_base/

      (For some reason, I’m unable to use the https: address directly from a browser
      to access this latter article: I had to google search with the title instead).
      ****************************************************************
      For all manner of Linux distros, there has been a history of erratic performance
      using nouveau drivers for the NVIDIA graphics cards which originally used nvidia-legacy304xx drivers.
      A Ubuntu developer, enigma9o7, originated a method for adapting the legacy drivers for Ubuntu 18.04 derivatives.
      Following his lead,
      the first reference describes the adaptation for Antix-19, which in fact is adaptable
      to all Debian Buster derivatives. The 2nd reference describes the updated
      procedure required for Antix 21, which is adaptable to Debian Bullseye
      derivatives.
      ****************************************************************
      For antix-23.1_x64-base, a Debian Bookworm derivative, a few alterations to the
      procedure are required.

      1) Kernel downgrade

      The antix kernel, version 4.9.0-326 in antiX-21, has been a mainstay in applying
      the procedure to all Debian derivatives. For antix-23.1_x64-base, download the
      linux-headers-4.9.0-326-antix.1-amd64-smp and
      linux-image-4.9.0-326-antix.1-amd64-smp packages, then
      sudo apt install ./linux-headers-4.9.0-326-antix.1-amd64-smp, and
      sudo apt install ./linux-image-4.9.0-326-antix.1-amd64-smp, then
      sudo update-grub.

      Reboot selecting this kernel, and from synaptic, remove
      linux-headers-5.10.199-antix.1-amd64-smp and
      linux-image-5.10.199-antix.1-amd64-smp, and then sudo update-grub.
      Reboot again, and the 4.9.0-326 kernel should be the only one available.
      From synaptic, lock the 4.9.0-326 packages, and from the command line,
      sudo apt-mark hold them.
      ****************************************************************
      2) xserver-xorg-input packages downgrade

      The Bookworm version packages have a dependency on the Bookworm version
      xserver-xorg-core package. Therefore, before downgrading the graphics packages
      to the Stretch level, the xserver-xorg-input packages should be downgraded to the
      Buster level. (NB: the Buster level packages work, and are conveniently
      available from https://packages.debian.org as “oldoldstable” versions. Stretch
      level packages would be very difficult to acquire).

      The following are the packages that were used:

      [code]

      xserver-xorg-input-aiptek_1.4.1-2+b1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-all_7.7+19_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-elographics_1.4.1-1+b5_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-evdev_2.10.6-1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-joystick_1.6.3-1+b1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-kbd_1.9.0-1+b1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-libinput_0.28.2-2_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-mouse_1.9.3-1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-input-wacom_0.34.99.1-1_amd64.deb

      [/code]
      **************************************************************
      3) Graphics downgrade

      The following packages are to be installed:

      [code]
      libsystemd0_252.22-1~deb12u1_amd64.deb
      libxcb-util0_0.3.8-3+b2_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-core_1.19.2-1+deb9u9_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-amdgpu_1.2.0-1+b1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-ati_7.8.0-1+b1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-fbdev_0.4.4-1+b5_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-intel_2.99.917+git20161206-1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-nouveau_1.0.13-3_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-qxl_0.1.4+20161126git4d7160c-1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-radeon_7.8.0-1+b1_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-vesa_2.3.4-1+b2_amd64.deb
      xserver-xorg-video-vmware_13.2.1-1+b1_amd64.deb

      [/code]

      The addition to the list used with antiX-21 is the libsystemd0 package which
      was required to complete the downgrade.
      *************************************************************
      It has been customary to perform the previous downgrades prior to any further
      customization with additional application packages installed with Synaptic.

      It is now important to follow this approach because of an unusual circumstance
      with the k3b, okular and ktorrent packages, if they are to be added. In all 3 cases,
      installation of them causes the removal of libsystemd0. With the completion of
      the graphics downgrade which required the installation of libsystemd0, the
      subsequent removal when installing any/all of the aforementioned packages didn’t
      have any noticeable effect. It’s not clear what would happen if the packages were
      installed prior to the graphics downgrade.
      *****************************************************************
      The customized .iso was created with ISO-snapshot on a HP Compaq DC5800.
      The target machine with the NVIDIA graphics card was a Compaq Presario.

      Len E.

      #141000
      Member
      Len E.

        It has come to light that there is a problem with the procedure described
        herein: how to freshly acquire the Stretch-level graphics packages required
        for the Graphics downgrade.

        In previous implementations: when Bullseye was the stable Debian distribution,
        Buster was “oldstable”, and Stretch was “oldoldstable”; when Buster was the
        stable distribution, Stretch was “oldstable”, and Jessie was “oldoldstable”.
        Under those conditions, any required Stretch packages were easily downloaded
        from https://packages.debian.org.

        Now that Bookworm is the stable Debian distribution, the only source (afaik)
        of Stretch packages is https://archive.debian.org, and again, afaik, there is no
        direct way of downloading all Stretch packages from there, especially the
        xserver-xorg-video modules.
        ******************************************************************
        A technique suggested in a web article was to install a Stretch .iso, and modify the
        /etc/sources.list file to reference the archive repositories rather than any of the
        current mirrors which by definition will no longer have Stretch repositories.

        An initial attempt was with the debian-live-9.13.0-i386-lxde.iso, but it would not
        install properly on my test machines.

        What worked was the non-live .iso, debian-9.13.0-i386-xfce-CD-1.iso.

        (These .iso’s are available from https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/archive/.)
        ******************************************************************
        When the xfce CD is booted up, the primary option is the graphics installer with
        the typical dialog sequence. The one change from normal is the answer to
        whether or not a network mirror is to be used. The answer is no.
        ******************************************************************

        The first bootup after installation needs to be as root. The contents of
        /etc/apt/sources.list are as follows:
        [code]
        #

        # deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 9.13.0 _Stretch_ – Official i386 xfce-CD Binary-1 20200718-12:29]/ stretch main

        deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 9.13.0 _Stretch_ – Official i386 xfce-CD Binary-1 20200718-12:29]/ stretch main

        # Line commented out by installer because it failed to verify:
        #deb http://security.debian.org/debian-security stretch/updates main
        # Line commented out by installer because it failed to verify:
        #deb-src http://security.debian.org/debian-security stretch/updates main
        [/code]

        Being logged in as root, the file can be edited with mousepad to add
        the changes required to reference the archive repositories. The changes
        involve commenting-out the remaining cdrom statement and adding two
        replacement statements.

        The modified /etc/apt/sources.list file is as follows:
        [code]
        #

        # deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 9.13.0 _Stretch_ – Official i386 xfce-CD Binary-1 20200718-12:29]/ stretch main

        # deb cdrom:[Debian GNU/Linux 9.13.0 _Stretch_ – Official i386 xfce-CD Binary-1 20200718-12:29]/ stretch main

        deb http://archive.debian.org/debian/ stretch main
        deb http://archive.debian.org/debian-security stretch/updates main

        # Line commented out by installer because it failed to verify:
        #deb http://security.debian.org/debian-security stretch/updates main
        # Line commented out by installer because it failed to verify:
        #deb-src http://security.debian.org/debian-security stretch/updates main

        [/code]
        After this editing, the next step is to reboot and log in again as root.
        *********************************************************
        On this 2nd bootup, synaptic is to be invoked from the menu.
        -Reload the package lists; the package total of 50765 shows that the
        archive repositories are being accessed.
        -Install sudo; it is not preinstalled on the CD.
        -Install gnome-system-tools, to add the “Users and Groups” function to the menu.
        ********************************************************
        Reboot again, this time logging in as the ordinary user.
        On this 3rd bootup, invoke “Users and Groups”, change the user status from
        custom to administrator, which adds the user to the sudo group.
        *******************************************************
        Reboot again, logging in as the ordinary user.
        On this 4th bootup, the user’s status in the sudo group is activated. From
        this point on, all actions should be normal.

        Running sudo apt download xserver-xorg-core and
        sudo apt download xserver-xorg-video-intel as examples will show
        that the installation is fulfilling its intended purpose.
        *************************************************************
        I installed debian-9.13.0-amd64-xfce-CD-1.iso on a test machine also to
        confirm that it delivered the same results.

        Len E.

        #141021
        Member
        Robin

          Hi,
          are you aware you can run more modern kernels if you apply the patches found at

          https://github.com/jorgem-seq/NVIDIA-Linux-304.137-patches/tree/master/patches

          following the method described in this thread and posting, look esp. for step 10

          I have applied this procedure successfully, before more current kernels included a largely working nouveau driver for this generation of nvidia cards for which nvidia neglects to provide their proprietary blobs to update Xorg properly.

          You can use then kernels up to version 5.6 instead of downgrading to 4.9

          But you still have to downgrade Xorg, which is something you should avoid. It will cause trouble with proper video playback, and also raise security issues: The needed Xorg version is no longer actively maintained nor security patched.

          Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

          #141291
          Member
          Len E.

            Hi Robin:

            I’ve been generally aware that patches are available for newer kernels, but I’ve
            never followed up with any of them.

            The antix-4.9.0-nnn kernel has been a good, well-maintained, utterly reliable
            fit for my old PC equipment, so I’ve stayed with it for any debian-based
            distros.

            Thanks for the update !

            Len E.

            #142405
            Member
            Len E.

              Hi Robin:

              I’ve now become interested in Jorge’s patches for newer kernels because
              I’ve stumbled across the fact that Linux support for the exFAT file system
              was added to kernel 5.4 and newer, so Jorge’s patches are essential for
              kernels 5.4 thru 5.6 if Nvidia-304 drivers are to be used along with the
              exFAT capability.

              From your experience with the patches, have you found a kernel for
              antiX-23 which works for this dual requirement ??

              Please advise.

              Len E.

              #142433
              Member
              Robin

                From your experience with the patches, have you found a kernel for
                antiX-23 which works for this dual requirement ??

                If I recollect properly I have only used the first 5 patches with the 4.19 antiX kernel, which has worked great on my 32 bit hardware. Then I switched to nouveau directly on antiX 21/22 once this free driver grew stable with kernel 5.15. Since then I never have touched the proprietary outdated nvidia driver again, hence I don’t know how it behaves when the followup patches are applied up to fit the driver for the 5.6 kernel. Keep in mind, (it will restrict you to Xorg 19 if that hasn’t changed meanwhile. But not all Xorg packages have to be set to hold, just a single one. Please check the forum for old threads, I faintly remember I have posted the details somewhere here).

                If in your shoes, I’d try first whether the v 5.6 patch is sufficient already for making the nvidia drivers fit for the latest version of 5.10 antiX kernel. If that fails, I’d descend one by one, selecting from the stable kernel versions (latest available minor versions always, debian and antiX both) down until reaching 5.6 and 5.4, and stop this relegation procedure once the patched 304.137 driver works fine and stable on a kernel.

                Good luck!

                Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

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