Question from Robin on word, not an easy subject

Forum Forums Kafeneio Chats In a Greek kafeneio Question from Robin on word, not an easy subject

  • This topic has 8 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated Oct 23-2:50 pm by Rantanplan.
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  • #90990
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    ModdIt

      buggery (n.)
      mid-14c., “heresy,” from Old French bougrerie, from bougre “heretic” (see bugger (n.)).
      Later (1510s) “unnatural intercourse” with man or beast, “carnalis copula contra Naturam,
      & hoc vel per confusionem Specierum;” from bugger (n.) + -y (4).
      Sodomist.

      Lot more at https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bugger

      Trouble with english is around the world so many persons understand the spoken words differently.

      That kind of Swearing in the presence of, or at the wrong person may mean you need a dental
      appointment or worse. Others just laugh or do not care.

      #91172
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      Rantanplan
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        Hello, bonjour @Moddit,

        I didn’t want to be the first to explain the word “bugger”.
        Indeed, in Old French, this word referred to a homosexual.
        Today, little used, we talk about a good bugger, that is to say a debonair person, a nice guy.
        Or even a slightly stupid person.
        Sexual conotation has disappeared today in the French language.
        But the French language is not the English language.
        So, yes, let’s pay attention to the vocabulary used.

        Best to you.

        Kind regards.
        Amitiés.

        • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Rantanplan.
        • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Rantanplan.

        Vive antiX !
        Vive le Groland !

        #91178
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        oops
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          … Now days, “bugger” means in French … the verb: to have a bug.

          #91180
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          Rantanplan
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            Yes, it’s true, only in french language 🙂
            We are agree, dear @oops.

            The Frenchies are very good at inventing nonsense too.
            i can say it, i am… 🙁 🙂

            • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Rantanplan.
            • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Rantanplan.

            Vive antiX !
            Vive le Groland !

            #91184
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            Robin
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              Many thanks ModdIt, Rantaplan and oops, for clearing up this. Question was originated from this thread:

              some forum users might know its real background

              At least in Germany (including former GDR), Austria and probably also in Suisse „Bugger” is a respected profession (see e.g. Austrian profession information system: #324802 Bugger/Buggerin). This is a historically grown wording, describing a worker in shoe industry specialised on the process of „Buggen” of e.g. leather. At least me was completely unaware of a special meaning of this word in English languages. Would have used it without any concern, so many thanks for your warning. See Wikipedia-Auskunft (German language, you’ll need traduzir paginas web plugin by Felipe PS for easy reading) for some more reference. Just a curious question: What is the real (historic?) background of this word in English language?

              It was a good idea to move on with the answer to the kafeneio.
              I’m flabbergasted from learning the true meaning of this wording. As stated in the other thread already: This is a completely usual word in German language, without any conotation.

              Greetings
              Robin

              Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

              #91190
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              ModdIt
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                Hi Robin,
                I have never heard the expression Bugger used in German, been living in the
                country on and off for a lot of years. Never met it as a name either.

                Personaly I dislike the expression as well as Assfu*’er which is another direct
                translation.

                Shoemaking, maybe used when real shoes or decent hand leatherworks were commonly made,
                I can ask at Pfingsten at a mill festival in Thuringen by the river Unstrut,
                (assuming still alive).

                I will live prepare blanks then carve spoons maybe ladles, woods I like to carve are
                in short supply. A broom maker, he uses Birch twigs, real shoe maker
                and an excellent brush maker from Naumburg an der Saale along with handiwork from local
                ladies are also expected to be seen. that
                Big attraction a proper brewmaster and both pro and amateuer breadmakers. Sadly one of
                the very few times the village oven is heated and used.
                Proper brewmaster means real beer not factory slops.

                #91233
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                techore
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                  I don’t find the word bugger offensive but it’s an interesting word in my country/language, American English.

                  It can mean a whole range of things depending on the speaker and context. When I was a younger, it was commonly used as an endearment for a small child and pronounced “booger” but now it seems more commonly used in place of f*ck and its variations. I’ve used it in the context of describing something unpleasant like a task or job. I may have picked up that use from watching British television.

                  I don’t hear younger folks using it so its use may be lessening.

                  • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by techore.
                  #91240
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                  oops
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                    Yes, it’s true, only in french language
                    We are agree, dear @oops.

                    The Frenchies are very good at inventing nonsense too.
                    i can say it, i am…

                    lol … Yes , and the pronunciation of “bugger” in french is “buguer” (not the english pronunciation, nonsense too 😉

                    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by oops.
                    #91271
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                    Rantanplan
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                      Yes, it’s true, only in french language
                      We are agree, dear @oops.

                      The Frenchies are very good at inventing nonsense too.
                      i can say it, i am…

                      lol … Yes , and the pronunciation of “bugger” in french is “buguer” (not the english pronunciation, nonsense too

                      Dear oops,

                      You’re entierly true.
                      The french is not the english.

                      In french language, we have two same words for this definition :
                      “Présenter un bogue, une anomalie de fonctionnement, en parlant d’un matériel informatique
                      You know “bugger” (this verb hasn’t equivalence in english language) and “boguer” (english equivalence : bug).

                      Good afternoon (evening ?).

                      Best to you.

                      • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Rantanplan.

                      Vive antiX !
                      Vive le Groland !

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