Recommended file system(s) on AntiX.

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Do you use ext4 by default when you install AntiX?

File system question

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  • This topic has 14 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Jun 2-7:50 pm by Brian Masinick.
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  • #107639
    Member
    Colonel Panic

      Hi there everybody. I’d like to know what your views are about which is the best filesystem for most users when they install AntiX?

      I’ve been using ext4 for (I think) about eleven years now, and am very happy with it on the whole but have recently been experimenting with btrfs in a couple of distros because it has recently been touted in some articles I’ve read as the best filesystem to use in Linux. Ext4 is apparently getting antiquated now and doesn’t have some of the features btrfs has.

      However, I’ve concluded that, for me at least, the extra facilities btrfs offers aren’t worth the extra problems it introduces, viz. one of my partitions was gradually filling up with snapshots and neither os-prober nor gparted could reliably detect or read a partition formatted with it. So I think it’s back to ext4 for me from now on (for the foreseeable future at least).

      Does everyone agree, or do some people here think that btrfs is worth it? I would welcome your opinions. I’ve also included a poll so that people can quickly say whether or not they favour ext4, which is still the recommended filesystem for AntiX.

      Thanks in advance,

      CP .

      • This topic was modified 12 months ago by Colonel Panic.
      • This topic was modified 12 months ago by Colonel Panic.
      #107645
      Member
      arnauld

        On Antix I use ext4. However on my Manjaro computer I tested and am using btrfs, am very happy with it because of the easy/fast snapshots system. In a few months, if I don’t encounter any problems on Manjaro I will re-install Antix (on my old laptop) using btrfs.

        --
        Arnauld

        #107653
        Moderator
        Brian Masinick

          http://www.wundertech.net/btrfs-vs-ext4-side-by-side-comparison/

          “This article will look at the difference between the Btrfs vs. Ext4 file systems.

          Btrfs and Ext4 are Linux file systems with distinct benefits. Btrfs delivers advanced capabilities like snapshots, data integrity verification, and built-in RAID support making it perfect for managing and safeguarding data. Ext4 offers stability, dependability, and outstanding performance, which makes it suitable for daily activities and various applications.”

          View the link for the complete report.

          --
          Brian Masinick

          #107654
          Moderator
          Brian Masinick

            “Performance

            Ext4 is generally faster than Btrfs for everyday tasks, thanks to its faster codebase and optimization for common workloads. It performs well with small file writes and is known for its stability and reliability.”

            That does it for me; I’ve used btrfs and it’s pretty solid; it works, but I’m not running a server, where btrfs would have some obvious advantages.
            I’m running a few laptops; I do a lot of Web browsing, forum viewing and Email reading; though most of us aren’t likely to feel much of a difference,
            for antiX I think ext4 is a better choice; that’s my opinion and the article backs it up.

            If I were running a Red Hat Enterprise Linux server, then I’d definitely consider using btrfs; I think that both file systems are stable for every day use, and since that’s the case, if I were operating a large enterprise database system, then I’d definitely consider using btrfs.

            --
            Brian Masinick

            #107660
            Member
            techore

              I agree that ext4 is a solid file system and have no calms using it except for data that I care about. For data that I care about, I use either btrfs or openzfs.

              Both btrfs and openzfs come with thier own problems. btrfs is supported but most Linux OS installers don’t configure it appropriately so you will need to do it then install the OS. openzfs with changes made in recent years is now pc, laptop and desktop, friendly due to not being as much of a memory hog. BUT zfs continues to not be officially supported by the Linux kernel developers. I use OpenBSD for zfs.

              Stick with ext4 and backup your data for ease of installation and use would be my recommendation. I use btrfs for my primary workstation, otherwise, I use ext4.

              #107679
              Member
              Robin

                The great thing with ext4 is: You can access it completely from within a Windows PC meanwhile, so no need any longer to format external USB devices meant for data exchange with Windows in the error-prone ntfs format.

                http://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/wsl2-mount-disk

                It probably will stay the top secret of Windows designers forever, why they have designed the access to it that labyrinth-alike, instead of just mounting it on GUI when attached… After all, ext4 is available under a free license, so there is no real reason not to make it available to all users easily, just plug and play. That’s truly Windows style, bossing the users around.

                Windows is like a submarine. Open a window and serious problems will start.

                #107681
                Member
                techore

                  It probably will stay the top secret of Windows designers forever, why they have designed the access to it that labyrinth-alike, instead of just mounting it on GUI when attached…

                  @Robin, Windows isn’t accessing ext4 natively. It is using the underlying or virtual Linux operating system, so ext4 and other Linux file systems are supported. Essentially, Windows is permitting access to the device and hands off file system management to the the Linux OS.

                  #108091
                  Member
                  Colonel Panic

                    Thanks to everyone who’s replied, and I’ve now had a look at Brian’s article too. It seems that btrfs comes into its own on servers, especially those that use RAID systems, but is probably a bit pointless when a lot of us on here (including me) are running older computers with hard drives that have a capacity of 500 GB or less.

                    Since OpenZFS has been mentioned, I saw somewhere that one disadvantage with it is that you can’t shrink a partition formatted with it.

                    • This reply was modified 11 months, 3 weeks ago by Colonel Panic.
                    #108279
                    Forum Admin
                    rokytnji

                      I guess I was the only one who voted no.

                      Back when I had my eeepc cheapo phison ssd drives.

                      I formatted that drive as ext2 because the drive does not support journal-ling.

                      Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
                      I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute off it.
                      Motorcycle racing is rocket science.

                      Linux Registered User # 475019
                      How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

                      #108280
                      Moderator
                      Brian Masinick

                        I guess I was the only one who voted no.

                        Back when I had my eeepc cheapo phison ssd drives.

                        I formatted that drive as ext2 because the drive does not support journal-ling.

                        That is one reason to use another filesystem. Ext2 is also rock solid but doesn’t have a journal. I’ll have to check to see the exact differences between ext2, ext3, and ext4.

                        Also does anyone remember ReiserFS? I think it’s no longer around, but again I don’t remember why. That was another ancient filesystem that some people enjoyed using. I believe there was also UFS and a few more.

                        Who can name five or more filesystems and explain at least one specific feature that distinguishes them from the other filesystems besides a different name?

                        --
                        Brian Masinick

                        #108284
                        Forum Admin
                        rokytnji

                          I learned using antiX live usb with gparted would fix fail to boot on ext2 when improperly drive was unmounted. Like dying on battery power.

                          Just pick check from the menu on the phison drive on gparted
                          Let it finish, reboot without live usb, and the eeepc would boot up again .

                          Just a graphical way to do a file system check instead of command line.

                          Sometimes I drive a crooked road to get my mind straight.
                          I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute off it.
                          Motorcycle racing is rocket science.

                          Linux Registered User # 475019
                          How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems

                          #108287
                          Member
                          andyprough

                            I used btrfs some years ago with openSUSE. The speed difference when using EXT4 is substantial though, and with antiX we have the snapshot tool, so I don’t have a reason to use btrfs any longer.

                            #108288
                            Moderator
                            Brian Masinick

                              1) Some of the advantages of ext2 are:

                              ext2 is suitable for flash drives and USB drives.
                              A file can be between 16 GB and 2 TB in size.
                              An ext2 filesystem can be between 2 TB and 32 TB in size.
                              There are also some disadvantages that come with using the ext2 filesystem:

                              ext2 filesystems are likely to become corrupt during power failures and computer crashes when data is being saved to the disk.
                              ext2 filesystems face data fragmentation issues which hinder performance.

                              The ext3 Filesystem

                              By the 2000s, the EXT3 file system type was introduced in the Extended File System family. With this file system still in use, it features the same characteristic functionality; however, it provides journaling to users. Along with that, this file system was designed to prevent corruption and performance loss at all costs.

                              The ext4 Filesystem

                              Being the default file system type for Linux, EXT4 outsmarts the file systems for their performance and operability. Its reliability and stability make it one of the most commendable systems. You can also find it compatible with SSD, which shows it to be a diverse file system in the market.

                              The JFS (file system)

                              Created by IBM, this file system came up as an open-source option in the 90s. While it is known to cover multiple loads, which shows enhanced functionality, this file system has been replaced by more robust and better options in the current era.

                              The Reiser Filesystem

                              This file system was presented as an alternative to the EXT3 file system type. This turned out to be a better file system for its enhanced performance. Although it was not up to the mark, it supported file extension, a prominent feature.

                              The XFS Filesystem

                              XFS was discovered as one of the best file systems introduced for Linux OS. With support for extremely large file systems, XFS made a mark in the 90s among the top-range file system. It was clear that XFS operates in a better environment and provides high-performance results, which is why it is still supported in the Linux distributions.

                              The Reiser4 Filesystem

                              Known for its efficient disk space usage, Reiser4 succeeded the ReiserFS file system. It provided support for large system files and optimized the disk space by managing the small files. You can find added encryptions and enhanced performance for this file system.

                              The btrfs Filesystem – Better – Butter – B Tree Filesystem

                              You can find this file system type for a very restrictive function. With options for snapshotting, drive pooling, and online defragmentation, this file system was not better for the production system.

                              Not everyone will agree with the comments on this article. Please cite other sources and options.
                              http://www.easeus.com/computer-instruction/linux-file-system-type.html

                              --
                              Brian Masinick

                              #108289
                              Moderator
                              Brian Masinick

                                This article explains filesystem organization and also lists several filesystems mentioned in the previous citing.

                                http://opensource.com/life/16/10/introduction-linux-filesystems

                                --
                                Brian Masinick

                                #108348
                                Moderator
                                Brian Masinick
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