Screen mirroring

Forum Forums New users New Users and General Questions Screen mirroring

This topic contains 9 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by noClue Mar 8-4:36 am.

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  • #19156
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    pgb

    Hello everyone. I am new to Linux and after distrohoping for a while I settled to Antix because it runs as lightning to my 2 years old i5 laptop. My only problem (and possible dealbreaker…) is I cannot find an easy solution to connect my laptop to projectors (with screen mirroring) when I travel and give presentations. The included randr solution is not good enough when you have to change meeting rooms and projectors. From all the distros I have checked, Ubuntu Unity and even better KDE Neon have GUI-based apps that detect automatically the projectors. Could you please do something about it on Antix because I would love to use this speedy distro on my laptop instead of heavyweight KDE/Unity etc. Thank you very much and keep your good work!

    #19158
    Forum Admin
    anticapitalista
    anticapitalista

    What are those “GUI-based apps that detect automatically the projectors” called?

    You could just install one.

    Philosophers have interpreted the world in many ways; the point is to change it.

    #19159
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    delix02
    #19163
    Member
    caprea
    caprea

    Hi pgb,
    hm, to avoid any misunderstandings.
    There is a GUI-based app in antiX already
    control-centre –>session –>screen resolution

    What is the advantage of the other programs?

    #19176
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    Hi pgb,
    hm, to avoid any misunderstandings.
    There is a GUI-based app in antiX already
    control-centre –>session –>screen resolution

    What is the advantage of the other programs?

    Laptop presentation mode is an indispensable convenience feature offered by a modern OS to people who have a use for it.

    If I put “laptop presentation mode” in Google search field, on place 4 comes the best possible explanation I could imagine.

    Presentation Mode is designed to help users of portable devices (e.g. laptops). When enabled, it applies advanced changes to the operating system’s configuration, so your computer stays awake, the screen saver can be disabled, the desktop background can be removed or changed to a specific image, and the sound volume can be set to a predefined value.

    When you enable presentation mode, your device stays awake and system notifications are turned off. It is possible to turn off the screen saver, adjust the speaker volume, and change your desktop background image. Your settings are automatically saved and applied every time you start a presentation unless you change them manually.

    That said, “the advantage of the other programs” is more then obvious.

    Surely, you could change a couple of settings on a couple of different places one by one each time you’re giving a presentation, but that’s what’s called “the inconvenience” or “the disadvantage” of the ancient concepts.

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

    #19190
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    skidoo

    Attached to this post is a copy of the script from the linked article. I’ve added a few inline comments.
    In its current state, I’m not convinced it would be “convenient, easily usable” to a casual user.
    Some type of accompanying documentation, or step-by-step setup prompts within the script would improve its usability.

    ### If the primary display is not attached to the LVDS1 connection,
    ### you can use the PRIMARY_DISPLAY environmental variable to setup different connection.
    
    ### ref:  http://www.admin-magazine.com/Archive/2015/27/Using-a-Bash-script-to-mirror-external-monitors
    ###            "the script is GPL'ed"
    ### dependencies:  xrandr, and notify-send (provided by debian "libnotify-bin" pkg, 23kb)

    forum software is denying the file upload.
    Retrying….

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by skidoo.
    #19198
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    DaveW

    While it is not the automatic solution that noClue is looking for, the arandr GUI Screen Layout Editor does have a lot of versatility (find it at Control Centre- Session- Set Display Resolution).

    The GUI allows experimentation with screen resolution and positioning. Once the desired configuration is found, the “layout” can be saved as an .sh file. Multiple layouts can be saved to work with a variety of monitors and projectors. By activating an .sh file, the monitor output is reset according to that layout. The .sh file can be run without the GUI.

    Layout .sh files can be matched with keybindings, to activate selected layouts via hot key combinations. There is a utility within the GUI to do this.
    However, that function is designed for use with the Metacity window manager, for the keybindings to work. I suppose, another window manager might work, but that is over my head.

    I edited .icewm/keys to add keybindings for the two layouts that I need (external monitor off and external monitor on as mirror to LVDS1, but at a different resolution). The lines added to .icewm/keys look like this…

    key “Ctrl+F5” /home/mycomputername/.screenlayout/externalmonitor-off.sh
    key “Ctrl+F6” /home/mycomputername/.screenlayout/externalmonitor-on.sh

    (The two .sh files were configured in the arandr GUI Screen Layout Editor, and saved to the default location.)
    It’s a simple solution that works well for me.

    #19201
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    While it is not the automatic solution that noClue pgb is looking for …

    noClue simply explained “What is the advantage of the other programs?”.

    On Dell computers, the function is on F8, on Thinkpads on F7 and Fn + F7 (or F8) will cycle through 4 different modes.
    (only computer — mirrored — both screens — only projector/2nd screen)

    Addendum:
    Laptop Presentation Mode / Microsoft Mobility Center in Windows 7
    (Just to illustrate the explanation from above)

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by noClue. Reason: Added Screenshots

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

    #19204
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    pgb

    Hi everyone. My mistake for “GUI-based apps”. Yes I was actually referring to the Settings menu (under “Display”) for both Ubuntu/Unity and KDE/Neon where you can easily and (most importantly) rapidly mirror the displays. In KDE/Neon there is even a pop-up menu every time you connect an external display offering display mirroring/ extended display etc.Anything similar in Antix or maybe a future development? Thank you.

    #19221
    Member
    noClue
    noClue

    Well, that’s the part of ‘sophisticated GUI’s’ and lacks on ‘primitive GUI’s’ from the past.
    With other words, that’s the reason why IceWM doesn’t use 1.5 GB of RAM.
    ‘1001’ such small details for use(~r) convenience are missing in antiX.
    You’ll have to decide on priority — RAM/speed or convenience.
    You can’t have the best of both worlds at the same time.

    How strange is to be anything at all. (Alice in Wonderland)

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