Strange Distrowatch review – and how to solve most of that reviewer’s problems

Forum Forums General Tips and Tricks Strange Distrowatch review – and how to solve most of that reviewer’s problems

  • This topic has 23 replies, 12 voices, and was last updated May 3-11:45 pm by linuxdaddy.
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  • #58310
    Member
    AvatarPPC

    Here’s an antiX review dated from today:

    I use it on 13 years old laptop with and it is really nice and usable, but it has few problems and bugs.

    Network manager is not very easy for beginners. It also has a bug- when you suspend session and log in back the manager loses connection and don’t see any networks. You need to suspend session again ang log in again – frustrating.

    Reply: that used to happen to me from time to time- since I updated my antiX 19.3 (probably some months ago), I don’t notice that anymore.

    One of the most annoying things is THE BLOAT! God, even the minimal version is so bloated, that when you open menu you are going to get stroke. After few weeks of usage I am still having problems finding what I need in the menu. And customization of taskbar and menu is not for beginners, so that is something annoying you need to live with…

    Reply: Damn, bloat? On such a lean OS? Sure it comes with 3 internet browsers, 3 file managers and 3 window managers and 1 window tilling manager, but bloat?
    On the other hand- the review does make sense- the menu looks, out of the box, a bit to crowded- use app-select to launch your apps, instead of looking for them in the menu…
    Also, if you mean, configuring quick launch icons- search for icewm toolbar icon manager… If you want to change the toolbar looks, there’s plenty of themes…

    Other problem is that it does not to recognize my phone connected trough USB. I have tried different window managers with admin status and still can’t acces phone memory and folders.
    Reply: damn, that’s why I wrote a script to connect to android devices- if you are using android – use it, if you are using IOS, install the needed software first…

    After last updates Firefox has completely lost audio playback, no matter what webpage I use. This problem does not exist with other browsers, also with FF ESR.
    Reply: “after”? Firefex has no audio playback in antiX, unless you run it with apulse (yeah, it’s a pain) ( “apulse firefox”)

    Overall, it is nice distro with huge potenital, but for now it is not the easiest to use.
    Reply: as most things in life, you have to learn what you need…

    P.

    • This topic was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by PPC.
    #58312
    Member
    marcelocripemarcelocripe

    Proofreaders …
    They do not study the operating systems they propose to analyze, do superficial analysis and criticize without knowing the system. There are several on YouTube like this, few study the operating system before recording a video, most record the video in an improvised way. Some are so biased that they praise one or the other GNU/Linux distribution and the others simply criticize without any kind of reasoning. I notice a lot of misinformation being spread, not only about antiX, but about several GNU/Linux distributions. There is a suspicion that there are remunerations for these supposed “reviewers” tarnishing the image of several GNU/Linux distributions.

    marcelocripe

    ———-

    Revisores …
    Eles não estudam os sistemas operacionais que se propõem a analisar, fazem análises superficiais e criticam sem conhecer o sistema. No YouTube existem vários assim, poucos estudam o sistema operacional antes de gravar um vídeo, a maioria grava o vídeo de forma improvisada. Alguns são tão tendenciosos que, elogiam uma ou outra distribuição GNU/Linux e as demais simplesmente criticam sem qualquer tipo de fundamentação. Eu percebo muita desinformação sendo difundida, não só sobre o antiX, mas sobre várias distribuição GNU/Linux. Há de suspeitar que existam remunerações para estes supostos “revisores” manchar a imagem de várias distribuição GNU/Linux.

    marcelocripe

    #58313
    Member
    fatmacfatmac

    Got to agree with you there, a cursory glance & a damning report, lots of them online about various distros.

    I’ve used AntiX for quite a few years now, & yes, the menu is getting over crowded with unnecessary entries, on that I most certainly agree, it makes it look ‘tatty’…. 😉

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #58315
    Member
    Avatarcalciumsodium

    I was chuckling/laughing when I read this post from @PPC. Then I read it out loud to my wife and daughter at breakfast. My daughter laughed and said something like this: Dad, that’s what you say about this antiX.

    For me who knows very little to nothing about computers, I have to admit, some of these sentiments in the review was how I felt when I was first exposed to antiX. The no sound in firefox vs sound in firefox-ESR. When I accidentally changed desktop and was freaking out about how to get the previous desktop back. Each desktop was so different. And then sometimes the sound goes completely mute even though the volumeicon says I have sound. I learned to use: amixer sset Master toggle. All those sorts of things.

    But I kept with it and learned and have recently resolved to learn more and to help contribute. So I started reading the forum more, and when I can contribute, I will.

    For me, the biggest advantage of antiX is the memory footprint. My antiX 19.1 32-bit system, when freshly booted uses 115 M of ram. My antiX 19.1 64-bit system, when freshly booted uses 165 M of ram. I tried Lubuntu. A freshly booted system in lubuntu uses 400-500M of ram. I tried Linux Mint. I really like linux mint. But mint with cinnamon desktop uses about 600-700M of ram at baseline and mint with xfce desktop uses about 500M of ram at fresh boot. And Windows 10 now is so gigantic. On my family computer which has windows 10 64 bit, on fresh boot, it uses about 2 GB of ram! Compare that with 165M of ram. For me, this is the biggest selling point.

    #58323
    Moderator
    Brian MasinickBrian Masinick

    All of this stuff is “baloney”; in other words, it might make sense to a few people, but in any case, 95%+ of the reviews contain personal opinions; only a select few reviews provide factual information. Those may be worth reading.

    It’s not that opinions do not have any value, it’s that only the best articles are very clear about what their review criteria is, and you have to read carefully to figure out which of the comments are factual statements and which are simply their personal opinion without even explaining the purpose.

    On the other hand, in my opinion – YES, it is ONLY my PERSONAL opinion, nothing more, a good review should clearly state what measures and metrics are being used to form either an opinion or a factual evaluation of features and performance.

    I love using antiX. Most people can probably figure it out, but to be fair, that should be qualified. There may be other choices that may be easier to use for first time users – UNLESS the hardware is so old that it won’t work at all because newer, more powerful resources are required. In that case, antiX is in a class with a small number of distributions specifically intended to run effectively.

    A distribution like our “friend”, MX Linux, is another useful distribution. The resources required are moderate, and the ease of use is also moderate. Without specific numbers at my immediate disposal, my opinion, based on years of use, is that MX Linux will also work on aging equipment, but as the resources become increasingly limited, MX Linux will exceed available resources on systems that will still function with antiX.

    Compare these to the KDE variation of MX Linux or a distribution like Mageia or openSUSE. Unless you use bare minimal configurations with only window managers and no desktop environments, these distributions, while quite capable given appropriate resources, will tend to consume older machines.

    Notice that I’m also stating opinion, but the opinions are clear and they are also based on two decades of personally using these, and many other distributions. Instead of flatly declaring one to be superior to another, the size, capabilities, and features are are noted. Specific metrics are not included, so these are clearly OPINIONS.

    Here’s ONE fact: during this particular run of Mageia, which I happen to be using at the moment, it is consuming between 825 – 850 MB RAM while running on a moderate workload of a Web browser and an Xfce Terminal in the XFCE desktop environment.

    Overall resource usage of distributions usually ranges from just over 100 MB with just a terminal running in a lightweight environment to about 1.2 GB or 1200 MB memory with a desktop environment, Browser with a few tabs open. I’ve rarely exceeded 2 GB of memory usage on my Dell Inspiron 5558 unless I run a loaded desktop environment and several memory hungry programs at the same time; I have 8 GB of RAM so this particular resource is never exhausted; CPU usage on this 5-6 year old system will, however, occasionally spike near capacity, but only for brief periods of time; usually sustained CPU consumption is under 10% of capacity.

    Brian Masinick

    #58324
    Member
    Avatarcalciumsodium

    Another advantage of antiX full is that it comes preloaded with LibreOffice. How cool is that? For many Windows users, they have to buy Office or get Office365 through work. At my work, they are transitioning to Google Docs/Workspace instead of Microsoft Outlook/Office.

    Another advantage is that I have been able to run windows programs using Wine. To me, if I didn’t have the wine program, I would just stick with Windows.

    One thing though. I have not been able to run windows programs that require the .net framework. In my experience, Wine would not run those windows program. Is there a way to do this?
    Thanks

    #58325
    Member
    marcelocripemarcelocripe

    I really can’t understand when I read the translation of the texts here on the forum “… the menu is getting crowded with unnecessary entries”, what would be the unnecessary entries?
    All operating systems I knew before knowing antiX, always had several menu entries, that is, one for each GUI program. The operating systems I knew before knowing antiX that do not have several menu entries are: Tiny Core (version CorePlus.ISO), Void Linux LXDE, Bodhi Linux and SliTaz. But as new programs are installed, new menu entries are created. This I think is completely normal, or is it not?
    I searched and did not find repeated menu entries in antiX, if the “bloat” of menus are due to a large number of programs, it may be better to choose a version of antiX that has the least amount of pre-installed application programs possible.
    And the advantages cited by antiX’s @calciumsodium over other GNU / Linux distributions and Windows already says everything about this excellent operating system, which can get better every day with the collaboration of every interested person.
    @PPC has already mentioned several times here on the forum that “App Select” or “Rofi” allows you to search for applications without having to look at the menus, just having one of these programs on the toolbar to access all other applications.

    Shortcut icons “.dektop” and @PPC scripts can be found:
    http://archive.org/details/@marcelocripe

    Rofi prepared by @PPC with the functions of application browser and file browser, shortcut icons “.dektop” and a script can be found:
    https://archive.org/details/rofi-pesquisador-de-aplicativos-e-arquivos-para-o-antix

    marcelocripe
    (Original text in Brazilian Portuguese)

    ———-

    Eu realmente não consigo compreender quando eu leio a tradução dos textos daqui no fórum “… o menu está ficando lotado com entradas desnecessárias”, quais seriam as entradas desnecessárias?
    Todos os sistemas operacionais que conheci antes de conhecer o antiX, sempre tiveram várias entradas menu, ou seja, uma para cada programa GUI. Os sistemas operacionais que conheci antes de conhecer o antiX que não possuem várias entradas no menu são: Tiny Core (versão CorePlus.ISO), Void Linux LXDE, Bodhi Linux e o SliTaz. Mas a medida que se instala novos programas, novas entradas de menu são criadas. Isso eu acho que é completamente normal, ou não é?
    Eu procurei e não encontrei entradas de menu repetidas no antiX, se o “inchaço” de menus são devido a grande quantidade de programas, talvez seja melhor escolher um versão do antiX que possua a menor quantidade possível de programas aplicativos pré-instalados.
    E as vantagens citadas pelo @calciumsodium do antiX em relação a outras distribuição GNU/Linux e ao Windows já diz tudo sobre este excelente sistema operacional, que pode ficar cada dia melhor com a colaboração de cada pessoa interessada.
    O @PPC já citou várias vezes aqui no fórum que o “App Select” ou o “Rofi” permitem buscar aplicativos sem ter que olhar para os menus, basta ter um destes programas na barra de ferramentas para acessar todos os outros aplicativos.

    Ícones de atalho “.dektop” e scripts do @PPC podem ser encontrados:
    http://archive.org/details/@marcelocripe

    Rofi preparado pelo @PPC com as funções de pesquisador de aplicativos e pesquisador de arquivos, ícones de atalho “.dektop” e um script pode ser encontrado:
    https://archive.org/details/rofi-pesquisador-de-aplicativos-e-arquivos-para-o-antix

    marcelocripe
    (Texto original em idioma Português do Brasil)

    #58332
    Member
    fatmacfatmac

    … the menu is getting crowded with unnecessary entries”, what would be the unnecessary entries?

    A menu should give you categories of programs – Internet – Office – System – Graphics – Multimedia – etc.
    Under those headings, is where extra info or sub menus should reside.

    Personal – App Select – Refresh Menu – App Killer – all selections that should reside under their respective menu/sub menu.

    That’s the kind of things I’m talking about – just makes the distro look tatty on first impression, to my way of thinking.

    As stated, I’ve been using the distro for some time, it used to have really clean lines to it. 🙂

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #58348
    Moderator
    christophechristophe

    One of the most annoying things is THE BLOAT! ***, even the minimal version is so bloated, that when you open menu you are going to get stroke.

    Yes. Too many programs. I have read that too much free software will sometimes cause a stroke in some individuals.
    Particularly those who work for Microsoft. But has been reported to happen to others.

    After few weeks of usage I am still having problems finding what I need in the menu.

    Better to lay off taking the initiative to customize your own computer.
    Remember: your life just might be at stake. Don’t push yourself too hard. We wouldn’t want you to stroke out.

    Forgive me for the sarcasm, guys. I gotta laugh.

    Also, I’ve never heard of software bloat being used in that context.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by christophe.
    #58359
    Member
    marcelocripemarcelocripe

    @fatmac,

    What items (programs) listed in the antiX main menu do you consider to be “tattered”?

    The menus: “App Killer”, “File Manager”, “Web Browser”, “App Select” and etc., are menus that are similar to what we find in other GNU/Linux distributions and Windows. But the “App Killer”, the closer the user is, the better it will be to close a program that has crashed/froze.

    On the site below you can see examples of the main menu of Windows 7, unfortunately I could not find these examples in English:
    https://www.techtudo.com.br/dicas-e-tutoriais/noticia/2012/08/como-fixar-pastas-e-arquivos-no-menu-iniciar-do-windows-7.html

    Now see the real “mess”, on the site below you can see examples of the main menu of Windows 10:
    https://edu.gcfglobal.org/pt/tudo-sobre-o-windows-10/o-menu-iniciar/1/

    And this example below is from the menu used in GNU/Linux distributions
    http://forum.ubuntued.info/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=2640

    I compare the main antiX menu to the Windows XP menu in simplified mode, shown below:
    https://wiki.ctic.ufpa.br/index.php/Configurando_o_Eduroam_no_Microsoft_Windows_XP

    You can edit the items in the antiX main menu and remove everything you don’t want.

    marcelocripe
    (Original text in Brazilian Portuguese)

    ———-

    @fatmac,

    O itens (programas) listados do menu principal do antiX você considera que esteja “esfarrapada”?

    Os menus: “App Killer”, “File Manager”, “Web Browser”, “App Select” e etc, são os menus que são semelhantes ao que encontramos em outras distribuições GNU/Linux e no Windows. Mas o “App Killer”, quanto mais próximo do usuário estiver, melhor será para fechar um programa que travou/congelou.

    No sítio abaixo você poderá ver exemplos do menu principal do Windows 7, infelizmente eu não consegui encontrar estes exemplos em inglês:
    (A URL está disponível no texto traduzido pelo tradutor da internet)

    Agora veja a verdadeira “bagunça”, no sítio abaixo você poderá ver exemplos do menu principal do Windows 10:
    (A URL está disponível no texto traduzido pelo tradutor da internet)

    E este exemplo abaixo é do menu utilizado em distribuições GNU/Linux
    (A URL está disponível no texto traduzido pelo tradutor da internet)

    Eu comparo o menu principal do antiX ao menu do Windows XP no modo simplificado, exibido abaixo:
    (A URL está disponível no texto traduzido pelo tradutor da internet)

    Você pode editar os itens do menu principal do antiX e remover tudo que não quiser.

    marcelocripe
    (Texto original em idioma Português do Brasil)

    #58361
    Member
    AvatarWallon

    Hello everyone from Belgium.

    You know that Belgium is the cradle of compromise. It’s not easy to run a country with four communities that don’t always get along, and we remain without a government for a long time. I think we even have the world record for the length of time without a government.

    So I’m going to give an opinion that won’t please everyone but will give food for thought….

    When I buy a car, I want it to run. I don’t want to change the crankcase, the spark plugs, the timing belt, the shocks, etc. Not everyone is a mechanic. Even if my wife was happy, I wouldn’t study to be a mechanic.

    What about you? Did you all study to be mechanics?

    When I installed Firefox in Antix, I noticed that I had no sound. So I don’t use Firefox with Antix. It was also difficult to install icons on the desktop. As a result, I have no icons on my desktop. Wifi does not work on my laptop with Antix. So I always use a cable to get internet. I’m not ashamed to say it.

    If Anticapitalista tells me to delete a file or edit a “Startup” tab in an editor or type a command in a Terminal, I want to do it. But I don’t want to tinker with my engine all the time for all programs.

    Remember, it was also Anticapitalista who asked me to register on Transifex to translate Antix into French. I managed to understand how Transifex works and I help the Antix community by translating the programs. At the moment I am translating the new “antiX Linux community contributions”. Even if I think I’m the only one using Antix in French….

    Best regards,
    Walloon.

    #58366
    Member
    fatmacfatmac

    You can edit the items in the antiX main menu and remove everything you don’t want.

    I know, & often do, but it is first impressions that count, & I still think the menu looks tatty, (it was much cleaner/simpler back in version 13).

    When I install OpenBSD, I only have a few installed programs on my menu, & that’s the way I like things. 😉

    AntiX isn’t what it used to be, for me, it still works OK, but is getting messy; time to consider if all these changes are really for the better; it used to be a simple no fuss distro, the closest I could find to the original #! Linux (Crunchbang).

    P.S. AntiX wasn’t/isn’t about looking like other distros, it’s about being a lean distro for older hardware, that runs well on modern computers too.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by fatmac.

    Linux (& BSD) since 1999

    #58368
    Member
    Avatarskidoo

    It was also difficult to install icons on the desktop.

    Blind to this because I seldom choose a sessiontype which provides a desktopManager, I just checked and… wow, I’m surprised to discover that, yes, this statement is valid.

    rox+icewm (antiX default sessiontype, plus autologin)
    Right clicking a blank spot on the root window does not provide a “clicky” labeled “add new desktop icon”. The toplevel of the menu of the icewm desktop menu similarly lacks an item suited to this task. 3 submenus deep, I found “add menu item”… but not “add new desktop icon”. ROX contextmenu when an icon is right-clicked: via the “New” submenu, one finds actions to Edit and to Remove an existing icon, but no option to add an item. Almost certainly, the ROX developers’ expected (and explained via documentation) users would create additional icons on desktop by dragging items from roxfiler.

    FYI, for a spacefm -managed desktop, if right-click is not (pre)configured to passthru to WM, the clicky is easily discoverable: right-click}New}DesktopApplication

    #58369
    Member
    Avatarskidoo

    AntiX isn’t what it used to be, for me, it still works OK, but is getting messy;
    time to consider if all these changes are really for the better

    Better for whom?
    I agree with the sentiment expresed in that quoted bit..

    it’s about being a lean distro for older hardware, that runs well on modern computers too.

    …and, as I have repeatedly opined, I sense that antiX has “lost the plot”.

    Nowadays, instead, the “about” seems to be:
    a noble endeavor, embracing a “rising tide lifts all ships” ideology, focused on catering casual users

    Said differently:
    we longtimers find ourselves “struggling to follow/understand the plot”

    #58370
    Member
    Avatarskidoo

    But the “App Killer”, the closer the user is, the better it will be

    I agree, and (but):
    it’s a shame the user is not taught the ‘name’ (xkill) of the program associated with the menu clicky. Knowing that detail would enable the user to realize s/he could, more quickly, Alt+F2 xkill [Enter] …or s/he might decided to bring its accessibility even “closer” by assigning it to a window manager keybind.

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