“upgrading” from sid to testing?

Forum Forums News Sid Upgraders “upgrading” from sid to testing?

  • This topic has 12 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Jan 23-3:59 pm by masinick.
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  • #31856
    Member
    Avatarstevesr0

    I just realized that I installed the sid version of 19.1 instead of the stable version.

    As this is not a “production” computer, I could just continue to use it, but I am leery of the warnings that Debian posts about using “unstable”.

    Particularly, I don’t want to have to make patches or to update my system every six hours.

    So, I want to “move” from unstable to either testing or stable.

    Is it possible to upgrade from sid to testing or stable repos or is this a one way road?

    thanks for advice.

    stevesr0

    #31859
    Member
    Avatarskidoo

    FYI a current (Jan 2020) discussion is underway here:
    Is changing the sources list from testing back to stable asking for trouble?

    #31860
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    For what it’s worth I ran a couple of Debian Sid (the “unstable” kid) for quite a while. One began with a Debian Stable installation and I migrated it to Debian Sid. The other one was a custom built system using antiX Core and a Debian Sid repository.

    Both worked fine for several years. In fact I believe that the only reason they are gone is that I got rid of the two computers, both of which had antiX Core and Debian Sid.

    I really don’t need to track cutting edge software any more, but I can say with confidence it can be done and it’s not very difficult to do.

    Brian Masinick

    #31862
    Member
    Avatarstevesr0

    Thanks, skidoo.

    I came away with a general sense that it is easy to mess your system by doing that <g>.

    stevesr0

    #31863
    Member
    Avatarstevesr0

    Thanks masinick.

    I am in no rush to mess with this install; OTOH, in general, I have not felt restricted by the stable versions I have used up to now. Except of course for the problem with abcde that led me to accidentally trashing my stable install of antix 17.

    So I will play with it for a while.

    stevesr0

    #31864
    Member
    VWVW

    Brian is just being modest. He’s only been running his blog since 2005 🙂

    "Are governments capable of evil? Of course they are, but they are far more capable of incompetence". - Sherlock Holmes

    #31865
    Member
    fungalnetfungalnet

    There is a an ongoing myth in the debian world that it can’t be done, not a single step back, let alone two. Although logically there has to be a way do be done, but it would be such a precision operation and a fine line not to break the active system in process of downgrading that you must question yourself if it is worth it. A simple reinstallation would be a fraction of the time.

    You did use the term upgrade, but we are talking about a total downgrade, nearly 80-90% of the system will have to be replaced by packages that are of earlier release, but then you have configurations that may not be backwards compatible.

    On the other hand people have run sid for years and there is even a distribution called siduction (I hope it is still around) that is entirely based on sid.

    #31869
    Member
    malemale

    @fungalnet

    +1

    Male is the capital of the Maldives and its wonderful people.

    #31877
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    Upgrades and downgrades are POSSIBLE. In my opinion, IF you have both the time and the interest, plus the ability to sacrifice a system (sometimes things fail the first time you try them).

    If you can spare time, a spare system (or one that has been thoroughly backed up) I actually recommend trying all kinds of crazy things, going forward, backwards, doing the “best practices” and some crazy bad practices, in order to understand what works and also how to recover from mistakes. A great recovery technique is to restore a system from failure, so that is a great idea too.

    My only caution is to make sure that you protect any resources that you want to save, and give yourself plenty of time to practice and learn. I picked up more this way than anything else I can remember, but it did take a long time and many tries, and multiple backed up systems.

    Brian Masinick

    #31889
    Member
    AvatarModdIt

    Quote: If you can spare time, a spare system (or one that has been thoroughly backed up) I actually recommend trying all kinds of crazy things, going forward, backwards, doing the “best practices” and some crazy bad practices, in order to understand what works and also how to recover from mistakes. A great recovery technique is to restore a system from failure, so that is a great idea too.

    Hallo Brian, thanks, my adage too
    do a backup or run live. Try what you feel like and see if it works. If it breaks try and fix it. Get some help, you will learn more that way than in years of playing safe and just lazily reinstalling.

    Running sid is occasionaly interesting but in my (much less than your) experience at least as stable and usable
    as many other much acclaimed distros — and much more so than many others. Long ago I tried downgrading, the system still ran but with issues. For that a reinstall seems the better solution because the downgrade was very time consuming.

    #31894
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    I’m pretty sure that “downgrading” a Sid installation is much more likely to create issues than an upgrade from stable to Sid.

    The only reason to consider doing it anyway is to see if it breaks beyond repair or if can be salvaged. The salvage effort itself may require manually inserting fixes for broken components or even a complete rebuild. The notion is not that this is the fastest way or the best way, merely that it’s a great way to learn.

    Reinstalling the desired software is the safest approach. I often use cloud storage to back up some stuff of interest and I also use DVD, USB, and other systems as alternate sources for the things that I keep. Notice that I have numerous different ways to get the things I want to save and retain. I can retrieve them or recreate them in more than one way.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by masinick.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by masinick.

    Brian Masinick

    #31967
    Member
    Avatarstevesr0

    Thanks all for the replies.

    I will follow up as I play more with this.

    stevesr0

    #31969
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    Thanks all for the replies.

    I will follow up as I play more with this.

    stevesr0

    Best wishes as you experiment and learn.

    I think we all agree that installing a new system and copying back the files you save is without question the safest way to do the job.

    MX and antiX are both based on Debian Stable in their “standard form”. As you can readily see, we also offer antiX in a variety of other more experimental forms. Novice users should start with one of the “standard forms” unless their goal is to dig, get frustrated and ultimately learn or try another approach. We do offer both.

    Best wishes

    Brian Masinick

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