Void Linux vs. antiX

Forum Forums General Other Distros Void Linux vs. antiX

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  • This topic has 16 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated Jul 5-5:47 pm by seaken64.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #62379
    Member
    mikey777

      Out of curiosity I installed Void+LXDE onto my 14-year-old 64bit laptop (Asus X71Q), the same one which has Antixcore+LXDE installed on it. I did this as I’d heard Void was very low on system resources, and wanted to compare with antix. Also, I’d read somewhere that antix might adopt the Void model, at some time in the future, so I thought it might be worth having a look.

      The comparison for me, as a Linux user of ‘intermediate skills level’ was interesting.
      Void installed okay, but it took me quite a bit of time to figure out how to get the wifi up and running, adjust the size of the panel (the horizontal panel didn’t quite stretch the full display width even after inserting ‘spacer’), and replace the pre-packaged kernel 5.10 with the older 4.4. There was another issues: a few of the icons in the menu failed to open an application when clicked on, which was frustrating, and I didn’t know how to fix this. Also, I really missed not having the convenience of the synaptic package manager, though I adapted to the xbps package manager pretty quickly and it seemed to do its job fine.

      In conclusion, antixcore+LXDE was so much easier to install, convenient and enjoyable to use, in comparison to Void+LXDE, and idle RAM consumption differences were only marginal, i.e. 175MB (antix) vs. 162MB (void).

      • This topic was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.
      • This topic was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.

      ▪ 32-bit antix19.4-core (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on :
      - (2011) Samsung NP-N145 Plus (JP04UK) – single-core CPU Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz, 2GB RAM, integrated graphics.
      ▪ 64-bit antix21-base (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on:
      - (2008) Asus X71Q (7SC002) – dual CPU Intel T3200@2.0GHz, 4GB RAM. Intel Mobile 4 Series, integrated graphics
      - (2007) Packard Bell Easynote MX37 (ALP-Ajax C3) – dual CPU Intel T2310@1.46GHz, 2GB RAM. SiS Graphics

      #62387
      Moderator
      Brian Masinick

        @mikey777: I agree with you. There are a handful of relatively light, efficient Linux distributions.

        While several of them are also good, I have not found one as easy to install and configure as antiX. Some of that may be familiarity, but I still think that antiX does exceptionally well with the combination of good software that is efficient and reasonable to use.

        --
        Brian Masinick

        #62399
        Member
        seaken64

          And you can easily “tweak” what services are run to get an even lower memory foot print. You can easily edit the startup files for the desktop session using the antiX Control Centre. Also use sysv-rc-conf to turn on/off services that load at startup.

          Seaken64

          #62439
          Member
          Jing-Jo

            I have Void Linux LXQT installed on this computer.
            That’s why you haven’t seen me the last 2 weeks :-) Sorry :-)
            I think Void is excellent if you want to create mini-setups, like mine:
            –Download , install and update.
            –Install QMplay2 – deadbeef -qpdfview -playitslowly – END-Of-Install.
            Actually, it’s supposed to go on a USB
            (( for teaching Music — no distractions))
            I tried both glibc and musl on 16 year old acer. No problems
            But I am actually waiting for Bullseye21-runit-core and/or -net to do similar ?
            But I have also made a FULL setup of Void LXQT. I don’t see anything to fret about. ( apart from backup to iso )
            Anyway…I am back !
            See you around

            • This reply was modified 3 years ago by Jing-Jo.
            • This reply was modified 3 years ago by Jing-Jo.
            #62489
            Member
            calciumsodium

              Void installed okay, but it took me quite a bit of time to figure out how to get the wifi up and running …

              I tested the latest VOID-LXDE. It has the 5.10.17 kernel.
              I can confirm that it is more difficult to set up wifi.
              At baseline level, it was only running about 130 MB of ram.
              I have to say that it is really bare bones compared to antiX full.
              I think if you want a minimal setup and build up from that, then maybe this maybe your setup.
              I think I may have been spoiled by all the features in antiX full.

              One nice thing about VOID is the booting up in runit. There are no bootup error messages like SELinux, no portmapper working, elongind, etc that is found in a2-runit or b1-runit.
              It boots up very smoothly in live USB in about 30-35 seconds.

              #62510
              Moderator
              Brian Masinick

                I’ve deleted all off topic comments in this thread by request. Please confine the conversation here to the “Void Linux vs. antiX” topic only. Thanks!

                --
                Brian Masinick

                #62551
                Member
                mikey777

                  And you can easily “tweak” what services are run to get an even lower memory foot print. You can easily edit the startup files for the desktop session using the antiX Control Centre. Also use sysv-rc-conf to turn on/off services that load at startup.
                  Seaken64

                  Thanks Seaken64 – I assume your above comment is for antix and not void.
                  The antixcore I use doesn’t come pre-packaged with the antix-CC. I did install it once, but it didn’t work fully for everything – I think links for some of the apps listed within it are missing e.g. click synaptic and nothing happens. I might take another antix-CC, now that you mention it, though it doesn’t really add anything to the functionality of my install. I was interested in the sysv-rc-conf for turning on/off services for loading at start up: is that the file located at /usr/sbin/ ?

                  ▪ 32-bit antix19.4-core (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on :
                  - (2011) Samsung NP-N145 Plus (JP04UK) – single-core CPU Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz, 2GB RAM, integrated graphics.
                  ▪ 64-bit antix21-base (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on:
                  - (2008) Asus X71Q (7SC002) – dual CPU Intel T3200@2.0GHz, 4GB RAM. Intel Mobile 4 Series, integrated graphics
                  - (2007) Packard Bell Easynote MX37 (ALP-Ajax C3) – dual CPU Intel T2310@1.46GHz, 2GB RAM. SiS Graphics

                  #62552
                  Member
                  mikey777

                    I tested the latest VOID-LXDE. It has the 5.10.17 kernel.
                    I have to say that it is really bare bones compared to antiX full

                    I don’t use antix-full as I find it has far too many apps for my needs, but instead use antixcore. Antixcore+LXDE is pretty similar in terms of its “bare bones” to Void+LXDE, with just the bare essentials, which is what I really like.

                    • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.
                    • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.
                    • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.

                    ▪ 32-bit antix19.4-core (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on :
                    - (2011) Samsung NP-N145 Plus (JP04UK) – single-core CPU Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz, 2GB RAM, integrated graphics.
                    ▪ 64-bit antix21-base (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on:
                    - (2008) Asus X71Q (7SC002) – dual CPU Intel T3200@2.0GHz, 4GB RAM. Intel Mobile 4 Series, integrated graphics
                    - (2007) Packard Bell Easynote MX37 (ALP-Ajax C3) – dual CPU Intel T2310@1.46GHz, 2GB RAM. SiS Graphics

                    #62579
                    Member
                    ModdIt

                      Bit of a chicken egg comparison, stable distro compared with experimental alpha and beta releases which are expected to show some deficits.

                      The antiX beta has been my daily driver since its release, boots very quickly and has been stable the entire time.

                      I use the full antiX versions of antiX, remove or add some applications to keep users happy.

                      Not had a real let down with antiX since starting to use it, about two years or more with a lot of installations in intensive daily use.

                      Many many sincere thanks to anticapitalista for the work he does, same goes for all others in the team and who are on the forum.

                      I hope that runit version will further evolve to a stable release, the last odd error messages dissapear. In my case none are critical.

                      I do not use LXDE desktop, icewm is very much my favorite.

                      And will stick with antiX as distro of choice.

                      my memory usage is a different subject, it is somewhat higher than normal as i have more services running that as delivered and a dressed up icewm.

                      • This reply was modified 3 years ago by ModdIt.
                      #62662
                      Member
                      mikey777

                        Bit of a chicken egg comparison, stable distro compared with experimental alpha and beta releases which are expected to show some deficits.

                        Yes, the comparison I did of Void vs. Antixcore wasn’t a fair one. In addition to the point you make, the init software was different between the distros: runit being the default for Void, being compared with the SysV version of Antixcore. I didn’t use runit for antixcore, as I’ve always preferred the SysV version, after initially trying both.

                        Like you, antix is the distro of choice on both my machines. It’s not a hobby distro, like it is for some on the forum, but an OS I use for all my daily computing needs. With antix, I don’t need any other OS. My hardware is ancient by most people’s standards (i.e. a 14-year-old 17″ gaming laptop, Asus X71Q; and a 10-year-old 10″ netbook, Samsung NP145), and to date I haven’t found any distro that beats antixcore(+LXDE) for its robustness, performance simplicity and ease of use. I have been using it for the last 2-3 years as my main distro, and will continue to do so until both my ageing machines eventually die.

                        I would like to sincerely thank the antix team for all their hard work in producing such an excellent OS.

                        • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.
                        • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.

                        ▪ 32-bit antix19.4-core (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on :
                        - (2011) Samsung NP-N145 Plus (JP04UK) – single-core CPU Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz, 2GB RAM, integrated graphics.
                        ▪ 64-bit antix21-base (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on:
                        - (2008) Asus X71Q (7SC002) – dual CPU Intel T3200@2.0GHz, 4GB RAM. Intel Mobile 4 Series, integrated graphics
                        - (2007) Packard Bell Easynote MX37 (ALP-Ajax C3) – dual CPU Intel T2310@1.46GHz, 2GB RAM. SiS Graphics

                        #62688
                        Member
                        LikkMii

                          antiX is incredible when you work it a bit….edit menus, theme it good. 19.3-4 and A1, A2 are rock solid.
                          I had to do the PA bit and go to a Liquirix to get my sound right.
                          My latest project is setting up keybinders on B1.
                          I setup apps via mainly super keys like I have it on my XFCE distros.
                          Ice is a lil harder to handle. XFCE made it stupid simple.
                          More people aren’t on antiX because of laziness.
                          “Reviewers” miss the whole distro speeding through it.
                          antiX rox !

                          #62692
                          Member
                          ModdIt

                            Ice is a lil harder to handle. XFCE made it stupid simple

                            Sure I have to agree but after using icewm for near two years, setup is second nature and xfce feels so veeery slooow in comparison.
                            I have two exactly same desktop machines hardware wise so can fairly compare running desktops or distros, just switch monitor input ports.

                            More people aren’t on antiX because of laziness,
                            I tend to think scared of linux because they keep getting told it is difficult to use. I find it much easier than windoze and dislike the prison
                            like constraints of IOS intensly.

                            #62719
                            Member
                            mikey777

                              More people aren’t on antiX because of laziness.

                              I think there are a few reasons why more people don’t use antixcore, or antix in general. I think it’s unfair to say it’s due to laziness.

                              Remember, only 2-3% of computer-users are on Linux, due mainly to Microsoft’s aggressive marketing strategy which has made them the dominant market player. As you well know, Microsoft is driven by profit – Linux isn’t as it’s free. So from the start, your pool of Linux users is already comparatively very small.

                              Sales of Linux spin-offs: e.g. on Amazon, there are several relatively long-established products on the market (e.g. information guides, mugs, teeshirts, etc) for say Linux Mint, Ubuntu, etc., but not for antix (though I was pleasantly surprised to actually find one product for antix (a book by Achal, published in 2021 for migrating Windows-users). Obviously, a presence on platforms like Amazon, which gets you exposed to a potentially large audience, is expected to help popularise a distro.

                              I think the most important factor is that many people lead very busy lives, struggling with a work/life balance. They haven’t got the time or inclination to learn the ins-and-outs of Linux. They don’t want to be Linux-hobbyists, which is a matter of choice, not one of laziness. They simply want a daily OS that works out-of-the-box, is easy to use, robust & reliable, & most importantly just gets the job done – I think this is why distros like Mint or Ubuntu seem to appeal to the majority of Linux users.

                              • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.
                              • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.
                              • This reply was modified 3 years ago by mikey777.

                              ▪ 32-bit antix19.4-core (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on :
                              - (2011) Samsung NP-N145 Plus (JP04UK) – single-core CPU Intel Atom N455@1.66GHz, 2GB RAM, integrated graphics.
                              ▪ 64-bit antix21-base (SysV init)+LXDE legacy install on:
                              - (2008) Asus X71Q (7SC002) – dual CPU Intel T3200@2.0GHz, 4GB RAM. Intel Mobile 4 Series, integrated graphics
                              - (2007) Packard Bell Easynote MX37 (ALP-Ajax C3) – dual CPU Intel T2310@1.46GHz, 2GB RAM. SiS Graphics

                              #62735
                              Member
                              calciumsodium

                                I think the most important factor is that many people lead very busy lives, struggling with a work/life balance. They haven’t got the time or inclination to learn the ins-and-outs of Linux. They don’t want to be Linux-hobbyists, which is a matter of choice, not one of laziness. They simply want a daily OS that works out-of-the-box, is easy to use, robust & reliable, & most importantly just gets the job done – I think this is why distros like Mint or Ubuntu seem to appeal to the majority of Linux users.

                                I agree with @mikey777, people want something to work out of the box. And when something already works out of the box, example Windows, it is very hard to break out of that mode. I chose to check out this antixforum because I want to keep on learning more about linux.

                                • This reply was modified 3 years ago by calciumsodium. Reason: typo
                                #62742
                                Member
                                ModdIt

                                  when something already works out of the box, example Windows, had to laugh at that,
                                  most of the hardware I have was given because it ceased to work or turned in to snail speed os after windoze updates.

                                  Installing windoze 10 is a never ending nightmare, updates cripple systems for hours in the middle of exams.
                                  Printers stop working after updates. it can not be that people want working systems :-).

                                  Regarding Buntu, Mint they are pushed a lot by magazines and in TV here, buntu buys advertising, mint was
                                  probably still is very popular here in Germany. I had computers a couple of years ago where mint was the only
                                  immediate running install. Buntu has often turned in to a bloated buggy mess doing a lot to put users off linux.
                                  Mint was pulled in to the mire as based on Buntu. I moved on to Manjaro before one update too many failed.

                                  Another factor I meet up with often is that shops tell users there hardware is broken, out of date, useless.

                                  Recently I got a computer “fail repaired” by an expert emergency man, my awful neighbour. The owner had already
                                  bought a replacement with windoze.
                                  Unfortunate situation as all that was wrong was one slot fitted with wrong ram.
                                  3 Beeps and no boot, quick manual search, problem very quickly found.
                                  Fitted a HDD, now I have a really solid industrial quality Fujitsu Siemens dual core pentium box too many.

                                  Have another desktop system he opened wrecking the cover in doing so. Also had mixed ram, maybe he is doing that on purpose to
                                  get commision on new sales from local store.

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