What you installed as your first linux distros?

Forum Forums General Other Distros What you installed as your first linux distros?

  • This topic has 42 replies, 28 voices, and was last updated Jul 11-5:27 pm by masinick.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 43 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #27403
    Member
    afghanafghan

    It was Slackware 2.3 in 1995. Go it off an InfoMagic Developer’s Resource 4-CD set. I already had some encounters with UNIX in college and some jobs after that and was actually planning on buying a copy of Coherent Unix when somebody announced on my local BBS that they had a bunch of InfoMagic CD sets for sale. I struggled to get it installed and working on an old PC with limited hardisk space (400MB shared with MS-DOS). A few months later I bought a new PC with a “huge” 1.2GB hardisk. I only remember using it for connecting to my local BBS using a dial-up modem, e-mails and ripping my music CDs into MP3 files. It took hours to rip and encode a single CD, but it was fun.

    It wasn’t until Ubuntu 6.06 that I used Linux almost exclusively for home and work. My job up till that point dealt exclusively with MS-Windows. When Ubuntu got clunky I move to Debian and when Debian went with systemd I switched to antiX.

    Attachments:

    Beware of people who knows nothing; they are the ones that won't know that they know nothing.

    #27520
    Member
    Avatardski

    Shortly after I got a new job in 1994, a programmer told me the company was setting up a BBS that I could access at work and at home. “But,” he said, “you’ll have to learn Unix.”

    “That’s cool,” I thought. “Anything but Windows.” I had made it clear when I was hired that I didn’t do Windows (or anything from Apple).

    The BBS turned out to be a Red Hat system. At home, I first got something called DemoLinux running, then CLE (Chinese Linux Extensions) 1.0 (Red Hat-based), later SuSE, and so on and so forth. Before coming to antiX, I used Ubuntu because a friend got a Dell with Ubuntu pre-installed, asked me to check it out, and then got an i-something and became an Apple devotee. Poor guy.

    Now, on this machine, I have antiX and Slackware installed.

    Dan Strychalski
    Hsinchu, Taiwan R.O.C.

    Correction: The BBS was probably a Slackware or Debian system. Red Hat (if it was called that) was still in beta. Doesn’t make much difference, as I could only log on using Telnet or text-mode dial-in. Did that for a few years, and came to love Gopher and Lynx.

    • This reply was modified 12 months ago by dski.

    On the Mac, Ctrl didn't exist; in Windows, Ctrl-A through Ctrl-Z did virtually nothing. From 1985 on, the choice was clear: you could get the full benefit of the most basic standard of computing, or you could use a GUI and a crippled keyboard and become this or that vendor's slave. I chose WordStar. LIVE FREE OR DIE.

    #27573
    Member
    Avatarseaken64

    The first Linux distro I “installed” was Slackware. Then Red Hat, then SuSE. But the first linux I actually “used” on a daily basis was Vector Linux, based on Slackware.

    Seaken64

    #27578
    Member
    Avatargreyowl

    I just moved to Linux about a year and half ago after XP was no longer supported.
    I tried Mint for a month and found it too heavy for my old laptop.
    I was interested in the minimalism of antiX, but was intimidated by it because I had not had any linux experience.
    I took the plunge and with the help of the forum, it has been a great experience.

    Dell Latitude D610 laptop (1.86 GHz, 2G RAM, 32 bit) - antiX 17

    #27579
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    @greyowl:

    Congratulations to you for sticking with it and learning how to take advantage of the great free software in the antiX distribution and continued success as you work with the system.

    Good job 👍

    Brian Masinick

    #29296
    Member
    AvatarEJett

    I became really interested in Linux in the early 2005 – 2007 time frame and I downloaded and burned copies of several different distros when I got a good cable internet connection (better than what I have now out here in the boonies of north Louisiana). I test drove several distros on live media, but never really installed any on a hard drive. I remember I never could get anywhere with Red Hat, but did successfully run Lubuntu and Kubuntu and Mint. Things were too busy for me to tinker with getting my hardware and drivers working well. So, the Linux urge went to sleep in me until MS decided we all wanted our computers to look like phones and tablets. So I started thinking about alternatives. I’m still able to completely kick MS to the curb due to some of the software I have to use that I haven’t found a suitable alternative for (EasyWorship being one). But for personal use I can manage with Linux. Recently (about 2 months ago) I did a bare metal install of MX linux on a project PC built out of leftovers and hand-me-down hardware. I think Anti-X is a slightly better fit, but that will go on another low spec machine I have. So, not new to Linux but very much an inexperienced newbie, albeit, not a young one.

    EJ

    #29297
    Member
    Sliver XSliver X

    I found a Redhat 5.1 CD at Walmart of all places in 1999. Took it back after realizing I couldn’t get my WinModem to work.

    I installed Mandrake in 2005. Used it for a month alongside Windows 2000 until I gave up trying to get my ATI video card to have any kind of 3D acceleration functionality.

    General hatred of Windows Vista led me to install Ubuntu 7.10 in 2007: I ran various Ubuntu variants exclusively for a couple of years until Windows 7 came out. I typically kept a version of Ubuntu in a dual boot config on all my desktops afterwards but hardly ever booted into them for the next decade, though I did make an HTPC based on Linux in 2016.

    General hatred of Windows 10 led me to install antiX this year: I haven’t booted into my Win10 partition in about three months now? I’ve been really impressed with how light yet functional it is: it leaves me with more resources for things like emulators and Windows games via Wine.

    #29311
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    I became really interested in Linux in the early 2005 – 2007 time frame and I downloaded and burned copies of several different distros when I got a good cable internet connection (better than what I have now out here in the boonies of north Louisiana). I test drove several distros on live media, but never really installed any on a hard drive. I remember I never could get anywhere with Red Hat, but did successfully run Lubuntu and Kubuntu and Mint. Things were too busy for me to tinker with getting my hardware and drivers working well. So, the Linux urge went to sleep in me until MS decided we all wanted our computers to look like phones and tablets. So I started thinking about alternatives. I’m still able to completely kick MS to the curb due to some of the software I have to use that I haven’t found a suitable alternative for (EasyWorship being one). But for personal use I can manage with Linux. Recently (about 2 months ago) I did a bare metal install of MX linux on a project PC built out of leftovers and hand-me-down hardware. I think Anti-X is a slightly better fit, but that will go on another low spec machine I have. So, not new to Linux but very much an inexperienced newbie, albeit, not a young one.

    EJ

    Too bad you didn’t get a chance to try out MEPIS when it arrived on the scene. It’s always been a bit more “nimble” than the majority of other full-featured distributions, even though MEPIS used the medium to heavy KDE instead of the Xfce used by today’s implementation used by MX. Xfce tends to make fairly conservative changes and it’s just a bit lighter than a cut-down version of KDE, so while it’s been a positive move, Warren Woodford used to do wonders with KDE and MEPIS; it was the most stable and efficient KDE implementation I ever encountered.

    I’ve had computers with as many as ten distributions installed on multiple partitions within a computer, and I’d always keep a copy of MEPIS. Actually, since each was released, I’ve retained at least two of [MEPIS, MX, antiX] plus Debian on my computers. I used to use Debian Sid with surprisingly good results, despite it’s “unstable” reputation. These days, I just use a stable copy of Debian and bring in new copies of Web browsers, the only thing I really care to keep fairly current. I’m no longer “tough” on my distributions; I pretty much use them as glorified access points to the Internet for the most part. So while I still have a preference for the distributions in this family and Debian-based distributions, the fact is that just about anything would meet my current needs these days. Sometimes I’ll just boot from a removable USB (and of course MX and antiX work well in those situations)!

    Brian Masinick

    #29990
    Member
    AvatarModdIt

    Interesting reading, thanks for the insights.
    This is the old man Moderator of Moddit Kids, my first linux was SuSe 4.2 in year 1996, before the majority of the group were born. My friend gave me a box of 3.5 diskettes then refused to help me install. He was right I could do it, eventually. Since then I have used Debian and many derivatives, Mandrake for a while. Mint was up until 17.3 my main distro for a long time, after 17.3 it went bloated and stale. It brought quite a few users in to Linux over the years though. For a couple of years I ran and did moderation and a group admin for Manjaro which is a fantastic distro as long as it doesnt break while updating, for a single person not so bad but I was getting hot ears from the phone, spending a lot of time fixing systems and even losing users back to windoze. For a while I moved all to MX, tried AntiX out of curiosity and found it very refreshing to have a system running as Debian once did. Easy to maintain, fast and lean. I do try a lot of other distros, have Manjaro, Artix, Mint 17.3, Devuan,
    Puppy, on sticks and Installed.
    Moddit also comes in because I modify most things to work the way I want them to so AntiX is no exception, it aint the released 19 any more, nearer to a rolling system now.

    #30001
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    Slackware, 1995. I’ve seen a few people mentioned Slackware and we ran into it the same time, 1995.

    I didn’t get broadband Internet for a couple years after trying Slackware and because of that I would buy books that included a CD and information on installing and using the software. I got broadband in 1999 but then did graduate work, so it was not until 2001 that I started installing software that I downloaded from the Internet.

    Once I got into Debian based software it’s been my favorite ever since. I use Debian, MX and antiX today (all based on Linux distributions built using Debian Linux packages).

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 4 weeks ago by masinick.

    Brian Masinick

    #30032
    Member
    Avatarolsztyn

    If the actual meaning of this topic is ‘Your first Linux distro’ as tried then in my case it would be Yggdrasil Linux, around 1993. It came as bootable CD. It is hard to believe but it actually made sound! On Soundblaster.
    Since those times (and trying many) the first I encountered last year that is well architected and actually useful is antiX! You can encounter some other distros that are well architected (such as TinyCore) or useful (though I am not sure which would qualify as such because if it is bloated it is not useful to me) but never satisfying both such demanding requirements…
    So thank you anticapitalista and antiX developers for your vision!

    #30087
    Member
    linuxdaddylinuxdaddy

    Hi olsztyn,

    you wrote :

    If the actual meaning of this topic is ‘Your first Linux distro’ as tried

    Yeah the first distros installed and actually used or the ones that got you seriously
    looking into linux as a viable alternative to windows/mac.

    Normal == 🙂
    depends on the surrounding crowd ?!

    #30091
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    Hi olsztyn,

    you wrote :

    If the actual meaning of this topic is ‘Your first Linux distro’ as tried

    Yeah the first distros installed and actually used or the ones that got you seriously
    looking into linux as a viable alternative to windows/mac.

    I’m almost certainly NOT a typical example. The very first couple of Linux distributions I ever used, while hardly the kind of software that a “typical consumer” would even see, much less use or enjoy, were to me:

    1) Usable
    2) Fun
    3) Practical for every day use

    Why?

    I had been using UNIX software on an engineering workstation for several years by the time Linux distributions started to appear. I was sending and reading Email over the Internet as far back as 1982, but way back then there were no “easy to use” packages and the email address (headers and text) were jumbled up with the actual message content.

    We “geeks” of the day would write our own tools to process and filter out the junk, even putting unwanted mail into separate folders, where they could be further examined and then filtered or deleted. None of the stuff we did was contained in an application, though some of us shared our code and concepts with marketing and development teams and eventually a few good ideas made it to commercial software. (Some of the early work formed into “Usability Engineering”.

    Brian Masinick

    #30092
    Member
    linuxdaddylinuxdaddy

    hi masinick,

    you wrote:

    I was sending and reading Email over the Internet as far back as 1982

    you definetly got a few years on me there I got our first pc used about 89-90
    as a used commodore 64 and also a tandy 286 (dos 4-5 )with a modem. In 92-93 got
    a 386 with win 3.1 and had netscape with a 14.4k modem (blazing 4 that time).
    my first cdrom drive 🙂 dual booted with deskview/x.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by linuxdaddy.

    Normal == 🙂
    depends on the surrounding crowd ?!

    #30095
    Member
    Avatarhumpty

    Suse was my first ‘serious’ attempt to replace windows, It looked
    cool (at the time), but turned out to be too slow & bloated.
    Then began a long winding road to minimalise ending with Damn Small and
    it’s fork Tiny Core. At this end, It felt like a chore to get simple things done,
    like installing popular packages. So I doubled back and hunted for something easier.
    Ended up with lubuntu 12.04 – minimal, super stable, quick, supported,..etc.
    Then I tried the later versions which just made my netbook sick with lags & freezing.
    The 64bit versions were even worse (my netbook came out at the dawn of 64bit).
    So I’ve been using lubuntu 12.04 32bit for 7 years until I find that newer
    software are not bothering with 32bit anymore. Another hunt, and I was
    almost committed to MX linux (64bit) after reading reviews, but the first install
    was as laggy as hell (>10 secs wait for each mouse click response.)
    In short, I stumbled upon antiX by accident due to it’s connection with MX.
    There’s a lot of stuff here that I already use like spaceFM, leafpad..etc.
    the rest I can get from the Debian repo, it makes the migration easy.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 43 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.