When you installed first time linux?

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When you installed your first linux?

We all have installed linux (I think). When and why you installed linux?

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  • Under week ago
  • Under month ago
  • Under year ago
  • 1 to 5 years ago
  • 5 to 10 years ago
  • 10 to 15 years ago
  • 20 or more years ago
  • This topic has 36 replies, 16 voices, and was last updated Apr 1-4:01 pm by Brian Masinick.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)
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  • #111767
    Moderator
    Brian Masinick

      @Vincent17
      I am very happy that you stuck with it and used various Linux distributions. Though you were once afraid of Red Hat on a server, the server systems are probably the “safest” place to make a mistake and here’s why –

      1) It’s highly unlikely that you were granted special privilege so it’s not likely to delete information that is crucial to the entire system.

      2) Unless very poorly managed, servers have excellent backup and restore capabilities.

      I haven’t seen very many server failures but 20-25 years ago I remember one server at a contract job not long after I got into contract work. They had an outage that did significant damage to the data; the only information lost was work performed since the most recent backup.

      Recovery took longer in those days but we were back in action on the same day.

      I remember issues that took place in a financial services job. I don’t remember ANY outage; they had backups of backups and redundant sites in diverse locations. I can’t imagine a better environment than that. I can barely imagine how cool their stuff must be today with the resources available to protect their business!

      --
      Brian Masinick

      #111804
      Member
      RJP

        If someone is intrested in old linuxes, I have many old Red Hat based isos in my archives,ve I have also OS2 Warp iso and many more.

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        #111850
        Member
        techore

          I am interested! URL, please. 😀

          #111854
          Member
          mcpderez

            I also ran antiX on various Dell D600 series and IBM Thinkpad T series – T42, T60…

            I ran antiX on all of those and an X201 yesterday! ????

            #111861
            Moderator
            BobC

              I’m pretty sure my first “Linux” was Linux Mandrake 5.? in about 1999 or 2000, when I wrote my own telephone answering system that answered the phone using mgetty connected via a US Robotics voice modem, played a prompt, recorded the call, converted it to a .wav file, and ran an email server program to emailed it to me at yahoo so I could hear the recording wherever I was working that day.

              I started programming in 1972 in Basic via 110 baud modem and teletype hooked to CMU, worked in the RJE on an IBM 370 mainframe in college, learned other languages and IBM systems over the years. In about 1980 the first computer I built was an S100 bus computer with 64k and 2 8″ floppy drives. I programmed it in assembly language and a little bit of C. I learned the PC’s when they came out in 1983, learned SCO Xenix in the mid-1980s on a 386, Microport Unix, and ATT Unix in the later 80’s. Linux wasn’t available then.

              #111862
              Moderator
              Brian Masinick

                I also ran antiX on various Dell D600 series and IBM Thinkpad T series – T42, T60…

                I ran antiX on all of those and an X201 yesterday! ????

                How many systems do you have now, and what are their makes and models?

                I currently have, from newest to oldest (I think):
                HP-14
                Acer Chromebook 715
                Dell Inspiron 5558
                Lenovo Thinkpad X201
                Lenovo Thinkpad T510
                HP Pavilion desktop S5737

                I’m currently using the HP-14 with antiX 23 Beta 2

                • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Brian Masinick.

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                Brian Masinick

                #111865
                Moderator
                Brian Masinick

                  I’m pretty sure my first “Linux” was Linux Mandrake 5.? in about 1999 or 2000, when I wrote my own telephone answering system that answered the phone using mgetty connected via a US Robotics voice modem, played a prompt, recorded the call, converted it to a .wav file, and ran an email server program to emailed it to me at yahoo so I could hear the recording wherever I was working that day.

                  I started programming in 1972 in Basic via 110 baud modem and teletype hooked to CMU, worked in the RJE on an IBM 370 mainframe in college, learned other languages and IBM systems over the years. In about 1980 the first computer I built was an S100 bus computer with 64k and 2 8″ floppy drives. I programmed it in assembly language and a little bit of C. I learned the PC’s when they came out in 1983, learned SCO Xenix in the mid-1980s on a 386, Microport Unix, and ATT Unix in the later 80’s. Linux wasn’t available then.

                  Your experiences are not quite the same as mine, but we did a few things at nearly the same time.

                  I was in 11th grade high school when my Algebra/Trigonometry teacher took our class on an afternoon field trip to the General Motors Research Laboratory computer room at the GM Tech Center in nearby Warren, Michigan. This was to raise a curiosity and interest in computers because the Mathematics department was teaching a couple of sections entitled Survey of Computers. I registered for the class as an elective, but it turned out that by the time the class was offered, I could have been a teaching assistant; I had programmed several things and I wrote a project for my Advanced Biology class in Basic, using an acoustic coupler (pre-modem) that you’d call a number with tones, put the phone in the acoustic coupler and connect to the computer. We used AT&T ASR 33 teletype devices and to store programs we used punched yellow tape and carefully curled it and put a rubber band around it so that it wouldn’t be all over the place and it wouldn’t break or malfunction.

                  After that point I made the decision to major in Computer Science and attend Michigan Technological University. Like my high school, Michigan Tech had a LOT of computer classes, but originally most of them were offered by the Mathematics Department, except for courses that involved hardware and software; some of these were in the Electrical Engineering department. A year after I started, the department became the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences. By the time I graduated, I was in the first class that graduated with the name Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. Today there are multiple “colleges” and several departments within the overall College of Computer Science and Engineering.

                  As for me, after BASIC, I had a few courses in FORTRAN, and I also learned some simple assembly languages for various small microprocessors. In addition to the Computer Science stuff I got some real-time programming, board assembly with a Heath-kit H8 and H11, classes after graduating at the Wayne State College of Lifelong Learning – more with the H11 and Intel board computers. Educationally I used PL/1 until Pascal became available, and along with PL/1 I used a really old language called ALGOL that’s actually similar to Pascal, but was around long before that. I also took a couple of classes using COBOL, in anticipation of potential business programming assignments and I did one such assignment for about eight months a few years into my career.

                  I briefly touched a PDP 11/45 computer system that had UNIX on it but we didn’t have it connected to much, if anything, so I didn’t get much practical work with UNIX until 1982, but then that became the focal point of my efforts because I was able to get into some prototype work in groundbreaking stuff that would later become known as “client-server” computing – MS/DOS PC systems on the desk, several lean tower systems as departmental servers running a hybrid UNIX System V scattered with additional BSD tools and utilities, which had network access to IBM mainframe systems running MVS or VM/CMS software. This was a couple of years before the widespread availability of TCP/IP networks, so we were prototyping our own networks and combining diverse connectivity techniques to get them to work together.

                  When GM started to get into acquisitions, they gave their existing employees the option to take a generous exit package or join one of the modified companies. I took the money and went to East Coast high tech; interviewed with several of them and joined Digital Equipment Corporation, who happened to be one of the partners in the original Ethernet, so that fit well into my networking background. I joined the engineering branch of an organization that did value-added engineering for major telephony companies, beginning with AT&T, their recently divested companies, and the other telecommunications companies that were attempting to compete with AT&T. Most of them insisted on using AT&T UNIX, so our organization wrote device drivers so our new models would be usable with the genuine UNIX, and another group also sold ULTRIX, a mostly California Berkeley Standard Distribution (BSD) remake of Unix. Our telco interests eventually led to the creation of 64-bit Tru64 UNIX until the acquisition by Hewlett-Packard; that telco group, what remained of it, eventually brought UNIX and later Linux into the telco and business communities about the time I went to work in the UNIX group; one of my friends who still worked in the telco group kept in touch; I told him about Linux and he was interested; years later, just before I left Digital and the UNIX group, that same organization DID get interested in Linux! (I guess I’ve been ahead of the curve for decades). By the way, a guy named Jon ‘maddog’ Hall was a friend of mine; we’d talk telecommunications, UNIX and Linux by the popcorn maker many afternoons; years later he met Linus Torvalds and he was an honorary ‘godfather’ to at least one Torvalds child. When I left Digital, Hall was one of a select few that I invited to my own off campus parties where we ate east coast seafood and had a few brews.

                  --
                  Brian Masinick

                  #111870
                  Moderator
                  BobC

                    Yes, the teletype I started on had an acoustic coupler, too. I remember spending $1000 on my first modem, a 1200 baud Anderson-Jacobsen, and hooking it to my S100 bus machine to dial into clients and fix things when they were in trouble. I used the S100 bus machine for that till about 1984 when I bought a Corona portable running MS DOS 2.0 and used it to connect to the Data General and Royal Iris systems I had learned to work on. I eventually replaced the Iris systems with SCO Xenix running FoxPro 2, I think. I bought a code generator and wrote my own templates for it. That setup kept me busy for many years because writing code with it was quick, and the code was reliable. Its something I wish I had here. Glade is the closest thing to it. After I retire, maybe I’ll play with Glade at rewriting script programs into generated, compiled C or C++ code. Compiled code runs dramatically faster.

                    Things were a lot simpler back then, but the tools available were very basic, too.

                    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by BobC.
                    #111872
                    Moderator
                    Brian Masinick

                      Yeah, I didn’t say much about my first couple of years after graduating.
                      “When GM started to get into acquisitions” — that was the first place.

                      That one cool job near the end of my time in the first company, GM, was really cool and laid the foundation for the remainder of my career.

                      I had some good times and I made friends with people my age but my first assignment was tough until I changed groups.

                      Ironically enough I was in a bowling league with guys from around the company and I was the contact person for a charity organization called the GM men’s club.

                      We’d typically earn five figures a year running concession stands at sporting events and donating the proceeds to local charities.

                      Digital Equipment Corporation was where I spent the remainder of my days until I went into contract work; I actually had an assignment under contract in another group later on, so I was able to visit some long-time friends one more time before I worked on my remaining contracts. Two of my long contracts were with Fidelity Investments. I never expected them to be that enjoyable, but my second contract with them was one of my best, second only to my first group I worked with at Digital.

                      • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Brian Masinick.

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                      Brian Masinick

                      #111875
                      Member
                      Trashthrasher

                        For me it was Ubuntu around 2008 or so. I’m not sure what version, but It was a dual boot with Windows using the Wubi installer.

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                        #111876
                        Member
                        RJP

                          I am interested! URL, please.

                          IT Linux from year 2001

                          • This reply was modified 9 months ago by RJP.
                          #113683
                          Member
                          techore

                            @RJP, you wouldn’t happen to have the last release of OS/2 Warp, v4.52? The one at archive.org appears corrupt. 🙁

                            If not, no worries and thank you for the Red Hat link.

                            #127591
                            Member
                            akaEpitaph

                              In 2011 I had an Acer Aspire and told my wife I was sick of Windoze and was going to put Linux on it, cold turkey. I had been using computers since 2002, an IBM Thinkpad 32 Mb ram, but all I ever used it for was having fun in AOL chatrooms after my first wife left. Been off the grid for 33 years and was on dialup so couldn’t download any Linux distros so ordered Crunchbang from Amazon. I struggled with that for awhile, had to reinstall because I forgot the password, then gave up on Crunchbang. I ordered several more distros…Fedora, Ubuntu, PcLOS. I spent a lot of time on my wife’s Dell trying to figure it all out, especially getting an internet connection. I’m a construction contractor (retired now), not a computer tech. I finally got PcLOS to work but couldn’t keep up with the monthly upgrades (dialup) and switched to Linux Mint. I used that for awhile, and tried several others…Puppy, TinyCore, Bunsen Labs (Crunchbang haha), Knoppix, Ubuntu, Tails, Slackware and others I forget. I switched to Debian in 2012 and using it ever since. Was it Debian 6 back then? I can’t remember. I always do a clean install instead of upgrading a version, it only takes a couple of hours to reconfig. Basically self taught through internet searches, still a novice. I have antiX on 2 “hobby” computers and like it very much, especially the Live USB creator. Thanks.

                              • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by akaEpitaph.

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                              #127646
                              Forum Admin
                              rokytnji

                                Had to buy motorcycle parts quickly on eth0 on ebay and other suppliers. My Beginnings.

                                https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/blog/rokytnji-396422/dual-boot-install-on-compaq-1540-dm-1388/

                                Just like every former windows user. Dual booter. It became a solo boot Damn Small Linux laptop later without windows 95.
                                Money from the shop helped upgrade my computer gear. 100 bucks is my limit.

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                                #127702
                                Moderator
                                Brian Masinick

                                  https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/blog/saikee-202106/ has an early saikee article called “Using Windows MBR to boot Linux ( or BSD or Solaris)”; it explains “One line summary – Put Grub in a data-only Fat primary partition and switch on its booting flag. Windows MBR will faithfully load Grub into memory. Grub can then boot all systems installed in the PC.”

                                  Good old days!

                                  --
                                  Brian Masinick

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