[SOLVED] Why the fairly regular need to restart Icewm on an Intel Atom netbook ?

Forum Forums General Software [SOLVED] Why the fairly regular need to restart Icewm on an Intel Atom netbook ?

  • This topic has 10 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated Dec 20-3:53 pm by mikey777.
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  • #30624
    Member
    Avatarmikey777

    On a 10″ single-core Intel Atom netbook I have the regular 32bit edition of antiX19-base installed alongside an attempted install of the antiX19-core edition.

    I notice that every now and then the icons in menu become unresponsive (e.g. terminal, libreoffice, etc won’t launch), so I have to restart icewm. At such times, CPU and RAM activity seem normal so it’s not like the system is being overstretched.

    Why does this happen ?
    Are JWM and Flubox more stable than icewm, in the above context ?

    • This topic was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by mikey777.
    • This topic was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by mikey777.
    • This topic was modified 9 months ago by mikey777.
    #30661
    Member
    Avatarskidoo

    seem normal

    yeahbut is “normal” on that Atom machine a “already taxed to 95% capacity” from the get-go scenario?

    Possibly (but unlikely) one or more of your installed programs has a memory leak, eventually depleting available RAM and causing swapfile usage. Another possibility ~~ after using your web browser for an extended period, its cache consumes enough of the available RAM to trigger swapfile usage.

    so I have to restart icewm

    Troubleshooting begs a more clearly stated, more precise, description like “seems to be fixed by taking these steps…”

    A change of window manager instance (via desktop menu }} OtherDesktops) would be quite different from “logout and login again”

    Are JWM and Flubox more stable than icewm

    we should expect that all 3 are equally trouble-free

    #30667
    Forum Admin
    BitJamBitJam

    I like skidoo’s suggestion to try other Window Managers. I would also look in the output of dmesg. Maybe “dmesg | tail -n40” or “dmesg | less” to see if there are any clues. Maybe see if there are any clues in the desktop-session log file. I think it lives somewhere under ~/.desktop-session/.

    My guess is icewm is crashing or freezing. This is not normal so the problem may be related to your hardware. It’s possible the other WMs would be more stable on your system. Weird problems sometimes have weird solutions.

    If you do find error messages in one of the log files or in the dmesg output then they might offer a big clue. If the error messages occur at the same place in the code each time icewm crashes then this points to a software problem. If the error messages are more random then this points to a hardware problem.

    Dust kills computers like clogged arteries kill humans. A dust build up could be preventing a key component from getting the cooling it needs even though this does not show up in any sensor data. The “stress” package can be used to stress test your system but this could result in permanent damage. It might be better to try to clear out any dust clogging the cooling passages and see if that makes the problem go away.

    Context is worth 80 IQ points -- Alan Kay

    #30671
    Member
    Avatarskidoo

    My wording was awkward.
    If just restarting a new instance of the IceWM window manager (via desktopMenu }} OtherDesktops) clears the problem, that does point to IceWM as the source of the problem. However, if OP was reporting “I had to” logout then login… that would suggest that some process (not necessarily a windowed application) running within the desktop session was the cause of the problem.

    #30872
    Member
    Avatarmikey777

    @skidoo

    If just restarting a new instance of the IceWM window manager (via desktopMenu }} OtherDesktops) clears the problem, that does point to IceWM as the source of the problem.

    Yes, you’re right skidoo – this was the case with IceWM. It was even worse with JWM window manager – after I’d chosen it and rebooted, clicking on the JWM menu (or any icons within the menu) created a further copy of the menu on the display, each time I clicked on it.

    It’s clear that my single core Intel Atom netbook (10″ Samsung N145 Plus) doesn’t like these WMs. However, other desktops or window managers that I tried, which came prepackaged with other distros, seem to run on it without any problem i.e. openbox, i3, xfce & lxde.

    As I really want to continue using antiX19 on the netbook (but obviously not with it’s prepackaged WMs), I set up antiX19-core with an LXDE desktop. It runs wonderfully – really stable and responsive, with low RAM consumption: 80MB following install, then 115MB with all my needed applications). When Christmas is out of the way, I’ll post a tutorial here on the antiX forum on how to do this, as it may be useful for others.

    I’m now going to mark this post as solved, as the solution is to change the desktop to one that’s not JMW or IceWM.
    Have a good Christmas skidoo, and everyone in the antiX forum.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by mikey777.
    #30877
    Member
    VWVW

    When Christmas is out of the way, I’ll post a tutorial here on the antiX forum on how to do this, as it may be useful for others.

    That wouldn’t be something like run sudo apt-get install lxde would it by any chance?

    Have a good Christmas!

    “These are the times that try men's souls" - Thomas Paine

    #30889
    Member
    Avatarmikey777

    @VW
    Sadly no, not as straightforward as that – lxde is only one of around 35+ packages to install, when logged on to antiX19-core …
    As I say I will post a full tutorial here, some time just after Christmas, but hopefully before the New Year – it’ll just take a bit of quiet-time to write, which is difficult to find in this house with two children bouncing of the walls !

    Merry Christmas to you as well – see you again soon !

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    #30901
    Member
    VWVW

    I was being slightly tongue in cheek but the LXDE wiki says it is 🙂

    Of course,if you fire up synaptic you find there are 35+ recommended packages also, as you say. Also, if you fire up Control Centre/Package Installer and just click on LXDE.

    (My son has the children bouncing off the walls too.)

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by VW.

    “These are the times that try men's souls" - Thomas Paine

    #30906
    Moderator
    masinickmasinick

    On a 10″ single-core Intel Atom netbook I have the regular 32bit edition of antiX19-base installed alongside an attempted install of the antiX19-core edition.

    I notice that every now and then the icons in menu become unresponsive (e.g. terminal, libreoffice, etc won’t launch), so I have to restart icewm. At such times, CPU and RAM activity seem normal so it’s not like the system is being overstretched.

    Why does this happen ?
    Are JWM and Flubox more stable than icewm, in the above context ?

    I have not experienced anything unusual with IceWM or any other window manager, but on odd occasions I have seen twitchy behavior where the mouse or tracking device causes movement of the window, “clicks” that were not from a mouse click that I pressed.

    This doesn’t happen often and it’s difficult to put on any distribution, window manager or software, though I have wondered if it was caused by interaction between certain kernels and window manager components. I’ve not been able to reproduce it sufficiently well to determine the cause of the behavior.

    Brian Masinick

    #30908
    Member
    Avatarmikey777

    I was being slightly tongue in cheek but the LXDE wiki says it is

    VW, many thanks for that link and will have a closer look at this – it’s possible I’ve chosen files which may be unnecessary, and that a slimmer & even lighter OS is possible – I’m on the case … 🙂

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    #30968
    Member
    Avatarmikey777

    That wouldn’t be something like run sudo apt-get install lxde would it by any chance?

    @VW, your tongue-in-cheek remark was very useful.
    Installing just the lxde package, together with the usual xserver and other ‘x’ files (& some others) works fine! In a previous antix-lxde install, I was installing a lot of ‘lx’ packages unecessarily, as a closer look revealed that lxde is already drawing in a lot of those packages. No wonder there were so many packages to remove when I ran ‘apt autoremove‘!

    Thanks again VW 🙂

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by mikey777.
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